Windows Between Studs?

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I'm looking to add light to a room.
It will cost a bit to open up the wall to reframe it for windows.
Does anyone sell windows that I can just put inbetween the studs with a short section of 2x4 above and below to frame it in?
The studs are 14" on center.
I know they'd be small, but if I put a lot of them in, it seems like the end result would be fine.
Thanks,
-E
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I think any manufacturer can custom make any size you want. Try:
http://www.peachtreedoor.com /#
or
http://www.pella.com
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"Erin" wrote

Double check your on center b/4 you order or buy a window. 14" O.C. is a bit unusual, usually studs are 16" or 24" O.C. Which would leave a opening of 14-1/2" & 22-1/2" respectively. Do allow room to shim & square up window in the opening, usually you deduct 1/2" from opening to allow for this.
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It can be done fairly easily. Most building supply houses stock the most common sizes but most will order what you need. Check with a couple of dealers about special order window. They can be made most any size. There are many styles and types to consider. Do you want it to open? Some of the crank out styles will give almost 100% opening.
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Probably best to just mount non-moveable panes. By the time you get a window frame with openable panes, there will be almost no glass in them. As some one else said, your spacing is probably 16" OC. Harry K
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If they don't need to open, there's always glass blocks.

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I have a few of the small windows installed between 16 in center studs. Put two of them side by side and it looks like one large window. Got 'em from a mobilhome supply store online. They are like two storm windows each having latches facing inward, aluminum for outside and white enamel for inside. The outside window includes a screen. They have caulking tape and screws to match but must be ordered as separate items. This is where I bought them: http://store.yahoo.com/amhs/windows.html If you have a local mobilhome supply store, check with them to get an idea of what they are. Bob

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LOL now that is a good joke! Now how can 2 small windows look like a big window? now if you live in a cave it might look big!

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wrote:

Many large windows have dividers between the panes. In this case, the stud space running vertically between the two window units resembles a divider between panes and gives the illusion of a much larger window. I wouldn't know about living in a cave. What is it like?
Bob
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A Large window has NO dividers!

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Raid wrote:

Hi, Think Mullion bars(sp?) Tony
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muntins, I believe
bill
wrote:

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replying to Raid, Robert wrote: http://www.huttig.com/documents/Geometrics%20Window%20Catalog_24.pdf Wow, one big window from smaller ones.
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On Wednesday, September 21, 2016 at 12:44:05 PM UTC-4, Robert wrote:

Wow, spam.
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rck wrote:

Hi, RV windows are single pane. Aren't they?Not good for colder climate. Tony
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The windows I suggested are a set of two, one mounted on the outside of the house and the other mounted on the inside wall. This gives a roughly 4 inch space between which provides some insulation. Where I live it gets down to zero or slightly below and I haven't had any problem. I'll agree it may not be the ideal solution, but the OP put forth a problem that was somewhat out of the ordinary. As the saying goes, necessity is a mother.
Bob
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You could do this, but consider how narrow those windows will be after installing casing & frame. It's not really that big a job to open a wall and install headers & cripples for a larger window installation.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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I can't think of any particular reason you couldn't mount solatubes sideways, except that they'd be ugly. And yes, you can have made windows that will fit between the studs.
But it's not obvious to me that, once you've punched a hole in the drywall and siding anyway, it's particularly more of a PITA to stick in a header and double up studs. Especially if you have to put in more than one little window to make up the difference.
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The point of the narrow window is that the studs would not have to be doubled. Header for attaching, but since there is no bearing as a wide window no additional structure would have to be added.
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Erin,
As for the expense and hassle of opening up and framing a conventional window (e.g. removing a stud or two and building a weight bearing header, etc.). I believe you'll find there's not a huge difference between what you think is the easier project to put a window between existing studs vs. the very common technique used to remove studs and place a weight bearing header in an existing wall. A competent remodel carpenter won't see a lot of difference in the two projects and you might really be surprised at how cheap the labor portion of the project is. They do it all the time and do it pretty darn quickly, efficiently and with little or no "collateral damage". An incompetent DIY carpenter (such as myself!) would take longer and more hassle than a pro, but again, not an awful lot longer than your idea with some pre-planning and preparation In my opinion, well worth the effort to get exactly the kind of window you like.
You need to add up all of the cost and hassle factors for your idea vs larger opening w/ conventional header.
*Single, larger hole vs. multiple smaller holes
*Able to use a conventional, readily available window of exactly any width and height you want (or better yet, a sale-priced closeout or surplus stock window), vs. multiple smaller, possibly harder to get windows, likely to have less options for dimensions and/or quality, possibly more expensive than the conventional larger window when added up.
I don't know the answer but I encourage you to think about if you might be seeking a false economy?
By the way, I believe a custom window shop could make you anything you want - I'd try to find one and ask them about the narrow windows.
As for the stud spacing... I'm not saying it's impossible, but VERY unlikely the studs are 14 inches on center. Standard stud spacing in the US is either 16 or 24 inches OC. Maybe you're measuring the clear space between the studs? 16 OC would yield approximately 14 1/2 inches clear space. Another potential cause for confusion is if you're measuring stud spacing in an area of the wall where it might in fact be irregular. Studs can be irregularly spaced near corners, windows and doors. If you're using a stud finder to determine stud spacing, some internal structures could mess also that up. such as added blocking to accomodate fixtures or outlets, etc. etc. Point being, unless there is something very odd about your house, the studs are NOT 14 OC. and you should check that out very carefully.
If your studs are indeed irregular (14 OC), to me that's another point towards building a conventional window opening.
Good luck
Cam
Cam
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