Windows

What type of windows do you recommend? I was told that the double hung windows were the best. How about the triple pane windows?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Define "best."
Double hung is a very good design and is a good choice in many situations, but not all.
I hope you know that triple pane is a totally different design part than double hung. A window can be either both or neither.
Maybe if you told us more about your needs we might be able to offer more information. Like are you building new, what type of environment (Alaska or Florida) what kind of building, what design style?
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I guess I should also add that how well they are made and installed is likely far more important than the design.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I email you a couple of articles about windows. They're from 2000, but a lot of the info still applies.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
could you post those articles, or at least send them to me too at snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com I am looking to replace 4 windows and am trying to decide if to attempt to do it on my own. I was thinking of the gliding window, since other windows in our home are tall and narrow crankcase windows. I live in CT and the windows are on the hight second floor so have to be installed from inside only.
thanks for any advice, it is so frustrating that i cannot get any quote on line without having a sales person come for an 90 min appointment.
thanks
pawel

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
make sure the style of opeable window does not reduce your hang and drop egress from the second floor for fire. in buffalo ny in late 1980's and maybe still now the windows had to be 10 percent of the square feet of the room or more for light and had to open i think 45 percent or more. check your code with your building permit office before you reduce openable size by changing from 100 percent of vertical crank out within specified inches from the floor to an overlapping double hung or slider.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In the interest of fairness, I'm posting the articles (you wouldn't want to have a nicer window than your neighbor would you?). As I said "they're from 2000, but a lot of the info still applies". The prices will certainly be different, and some manufacturers may have changed. Please note, they are looooooong.
CONSUMER REPORTS REPLACEMENT WINDOWS ARTICLE 10/00: New windows can cut your utility bills, but will you save enough to justify the upgrade?
With last summer's stratospheric gasoline prices a fresh reminder and the prospect of higher home heating cost looming as well, many homeowners may wonder whether it's time to replace aging, drafty windows with efficient, tight fitting ones. Old windows - a single sheet of plain glass in a wood or metal frame allow heat to pass through the glass and air to migrate through gaps and cracks in the frame. Modern windows incorporate a frame made of all-vinyl or wood, often covered in vinyl or aluminum, with two or three sheets of glass that are sometimes specially coated and separated with air or another gas to help cut energy use.
You'll usually save money by replacing old single-glazed windows with virtually any energy-efficient new window. But you aren't likely to recoup the initial outlay through lower heating and cooling bills for 20 years or more. That's why it makes the most sense to install new windows when the old ones have deteriorated, when you're remodeling, or when you want windows that are easier to wash and maintain. (If enough homeowners installed new windows, however, the individual small savings could add up to significant nationwide savings of energy, with attendant benefits to the environment.
Determining which windows to buy, however, can be daunting. New standardized labels, so far required in only a handful of states, are supposed to make it easier to comparison shop for new windows. (See "How to Decode Labels) But not all windows carry the labels, which cover only energy efficiency, not wind and rain resistance, durability, or convenience.
To give you information that the labels don't, we hired an outside lab to test 16 double-hung and 2 casement windows from Andersen, Marvin, Pella, and other major manufacturers. We chose double-glazed windows with argon between the panes and a low-E coating. That's a sensible package in most parts of the country. Our window sized for an opening of about 3x5 feet, ranged from $150 to $415.
GLASS PANES: The type of glazing can affect a window's price and energy performance even more than the frame. Here are factors to weigh:
Single, double, or triple glazing. A single sheet of clear glass allows the highest transfer of energy, offering little insulation against frigid winters or searing summers.
Double-glazed windows have a sealed space between two panes of glass to provide an added layer of insulation. Compared with a single pane. double glazing can cut heat loss of the window nearly in half.
Triple-glazed windows have a higher insulating value still, but few manufacturers offer them. The extra layer adds to the weight and cost.
Gas filling. The gas in the gap between the panes improves the window's insulating value. Ordinary air works fine and is sometimes a manufacturer's "standard" option. A gas like argon will provide better thermal performance. Some manufacturers make argon filling standard. Top-of-the-line sometimes incorporate more exotic gases like krypton for still better insulation. Like triple glazing however, this option isn't seen very often.
Plain glass or "low-E" coating - Clear glass allows large amounts of radiant energy (heat from the sun in the summer, heat out from your house in the winter) to pass through low-E (for low-emission) coatings add more insulation value to the window by reflecting heat back into the house and blocking some heat from the sun. The coatings can be fine-tuned for different climates, producing Southern and Northern windows, for example. Sometimes multiple coatings are applied to block even more radiant energy. Some coatings may darken the glass, like tinted glass in a car, an effect some people may find undesirable. Check a sample at the store.
MATERIAL MATTERS: Windows like these can be made for new construction (nailed into an opening, then finished with trim), or as a replacement for existing window. Some come in custom sizes, others only in stock sizes. The materials that make a window frame can affect energy efficiency, maintenance, and price.
Wood:
For sheer elegance, natural wood is hard to beat, though it usually costs more than vinyl and requires painting or staining. To minimize maintenance where it's needed most (the exterior side exposed the weather) many manufacturers cover the wood in vinyl or aluminum.
Vinyl:
Many vinyl windows feature sturdy welded corners that are less likely to pull apart from repeated swelling and shrinking as temperatures rise and fall. Vinyl isn't usually available in many colors.
Aluminum:
Aluminum windows have dwindled in popularity as vinyl's star has risen. Aluminum's biggest drawback is that it conducts heat readily. That can make the area around the window feel chilly. In places like New England, a simple aluminum frame can become cold enough to condense moisture or frost on the inside. (In the south, where heat loss is less of an issue, aluminum can be a good choice.) Better aluminum windows are "thermally broken" with insulating material between interior and exterior components.
Vinyl/Wood Composite:
Andersen and other manufacturers are beginning to offer Composite frames, claiming they offer the strength and durability of wood with the low upkeep of vinyl. For example, the Andersen Renewal and Millennium windows use frames made from a mixture of wood fibers and vinyl. According to the company, the compound is less susceptible to temperature changes than are other materials. In our tests, the Millennium performed quite well and proved very durable, although other, less-expensive Andersen windows also did well.
WHAT THE NUMBERS MEAN: Window makers use the term U-factor as a measure of thermal performance. It describes a window's ability to conduct heat. The Ratings also give the better-known R-value (the inverse of the U-factor) which describes insulating ability. The higher the R-value (or the lower the U-factor) the better a window will keep your home cool in summer and warm in winter.
WEATHERING THE ELEMENTS: The acid test of any window is how well it holds up to the elements. So our tests focused on other aspects of performance, not just thermal efficiency.
First, we gauged each window's ability to block drafts, repel water, open smoothly and easily, and close snugly. Next came two weeks of accelerated punishment, including alternating periods of high heat, frigid temperatures, radiant heat, and simulated rainstorms. Then we checked for structural changes and re-evaluated performance.
Wind and rain leakage:
When new, most windows did a very good or excellent job at sealing out fairly strong winds when the outside thermometer registered about 70 F. But when we dropped the temperature to zero (which can cause weather stripping and other components to shrink or stiffen) only the Marvin Clad Ultimate, the Andersen Tilt-Wash, Narroline, and casement; the Pella ProLine, and the CertainTeed Bryn Mawr II performed extremely well.
Five windows performed poorly in the cold; they leaked at least four times as much air as the highest-rated windows.
Most windows did a decent job of repelling rain; seven (see the Ratings) prevented all water leakage in the face of 50-mph winds. The windows that fared worst in the rain were the Alside UltraMaxx, Crestline VinylCrest, WeatherShield Visions 2000, and Wenco Series 8.
Durability:
Most windows held up remarkably well. The Crestline VinylCrest suffered the most structural changes bowed stiles, rails, and jambs but the Wenco Series 8 had the worst fall-off in performance.
Ease of use:
Most new double-hung windows have tilting sashes, a very handy feature that lets you pivot them inward for easier cleaning. Among the tested windows, only the Andersen Narroline has non-tilting sashes. With most windows, you simply flip a lever or two to tilt the sash inward. But with some, you must pull the sash out of its vinyl track.
To help keep out water, some double-hung windows (see Ratings) have a thin lip (a strip of wood or vinyl about an inch high) that rises from the sill. You may need to work around the lip when installing an air conditioner.
RECOMMENDATIONS: If you decide to replace old windows with new, high-efficiency ones, be sure they're designed for the weather in your area:
In the South:
Cooling costs predominate here, so look for double glazing and a low-E coating. Give first consideration to windows with a low solar heat-gain coefficient; the U.S. Department of Energy recommends a number of 0.4 or less.
In the Central states:
Here, heating and cooling share the spotlight. Again, look for double-glazing with a low-E coating. You'll also want high insulating value and a solar heat-gain coefficient of 0.55 or less.
In the North:
Heating bills constitute the biggest concern. Give priority to well-insulated, double-glazed windows that are draft-free. A low-E coating isn't essential.
The best double-hung window was the Marvin Clad Climate, $310. The wood-frame Pella ProLine was nearly as good and sells for a lot less. At $180, it's rated a Consumer Reports Best Buy. The standout vinyl window was the CertainTeed Bryn Mawr II, $180. The Survivor 5500, $155, is also a very good choice.
HOW THE SAVINGS COMPARE: If you're considering new windows, not just storm windows and better weather stripping, what kind of saving can you expect from the different types of glazing available?
To find out, we tested three versions of the WeatherShield WeatherShield: The basic Insulated, which features plain air between the panes and lacks a low-E coating; the mid-line (the one we rated), with argon gas between the panes and a Low-E coating; and the top-of-the-line Value R5, with argon/krypton gas and two Low-E coatings (The "R5" is the insulating value in the center of the glass; the window's overall R-value is much lower.)
Using the RESFEN 3.1 computer program developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with our test results, we calculated the potential energy savings for a hypothetical house in three localities: Madison, Wis. (a Northern city where heating costs predominate); Phoenix, Ariz. (a southern city where bills run highest for air conditioning); and Kansas City, Mo. (a Central states area where both heating and cooling costs are significant.)
We estimated the annual savings, based on replacing 20 3x5-foot single-pane windows in a 2,000-square-foot house with the various versions of the WeatherShield window. We reckoned on electricity for cooling and natural gas for heating, at the national average utility rates of 8 cents per kilowatt-hour for electricity and natural gas at 70 cents per therm. (Of course, changing any of those variables would change specific dollar amounts.)
Replacing existing single-glazed windows can yield the biggest annual savings in the South, but only with the most expensive glazing option. But even then, it would take more than 30 years of lower energy bills to pay for the new windows-without installation.
In the North, insulated windows yielded the greatest savings, while savings in the Central region doubled with an upgrade to Low-E with argon. Moving to the Value R5 windows in these regions would have little benefit.
Window Average
Price R-Value Heat
Gain North
Energy
Cost North
Saving Central
Energy
Cost Central
Saving South
Energy
Cost South
Saving
Single
glazed - 1.1 0.79 $1321 - $1056 - $1025 -
Insulated $225 1.8 0.82 $1188 10% $965 9% $1013 1%
Insulated
low-E
with argon $220 2.6 0.42 $1165 12% $880 17% $769 33%
Value R5 $485 3.2 0.33 $1151 13% $854 19% $712 44%
ANATOMY OF AN ENERGY-EFFICIENT WINDOW: The frame of a new energy-efficient window will be made of vinyl or of wood clad in vinyl or aluminum for durability. Glazing will be two panes of glass sealed around the edges and often treated with a low-E coating to cut heat loss. In our tests, most windows proved to be well made, able to withstand temperature extremes, wind, and rain.
The Effect of Low-E Coating:
A low-E coating on a window makes the glass act something like a two-way mirror, reflecting heat rather than letting it escape. The image here, captured by our infrared camera, shows the kind of difference a low-E coating can make, blocking the heat emitted by a person standing behind a window (we had removed the lower sash of each window). As you can see, the low-E coating in the window on the left effectively blocks almost all the heat, while the uncoated window on the right lets heat pass through.
ON THE CORNERS: The last time we tested windows in 1993 we advised readers to avoid vinyl windows whose corners are screwed together because they may start to pull apart after being exposed to heat and cold.
We have to temper that advice. One window we tested, the Simonton Reflections 5050, $155 has mechanically fastened corners, not welded ones like the other windows in the group. The Reflections performed very well overall, earning high marks for wind and rain resistance and for durability. If we had included it in the Ratings, the Reflections would have been the third-ranked vinyl window, similar in performance to the Lowe's Survivor 5500.
HOW TO DECODE LABELS: The NFRC label - Alaska, California, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, and Wisconsin require windows to be certified by the National Fenestration Rating Council and labeled with the results. In other states, many certified products bear the NFRC label even though it's not required.
At present, only a window's U-factor needs to be labeled. As of January 2001, certification will require labels to display figures for solar heat gain and visible light transmittance. Now, that information isn't always listed on the NFRC label.
Solar heat-gain coefficient refers to the amount of heat that radiates through the windows from outdoors. The numbers range from 0 to 1. A high number means the window allows the sun's heat to get indoors, a desirable trait in a northern Minnesota winter but thoroughly unwelcome in a Houston summer.
Visible light transmittance refers to the amount of visible light entering a room. Figures range from 0 to 1; a window with a high number will allow in more light.
Various glazings, coatings, and frame designs can have an effect on both of those factors.
The Energy Star label:
So far, only a few manufacturers participate in the federally sponsored Energy Star labeling program. These labels digest the data from the NFRC label and identify a window as suitable for a specific region. You need only look at the map on the Energy Star label to see whether the window is appropriate for your area. But only a few of the tested windows had the Energy Star label. Some unlabeled windows may actually be more energy-efficient.
THE TESTS BEHIND THE RATINGS: We hired an outside lab to test windows (without screens) fitted with double-pane glass that has a low-E coating and argon between the panes. Material for the frame and sashes is typically aluminum- or vinyl-clad wood or all-vinyl. The Andersen Millennium is made of extruded wood fibers and vinyl. The Crest/me Crest-Wood has a vinyl frame, vinyl-clad wood sashes, and interior wood trim. Overall score is based mainly on R-value, wind- and rain-resistance, and durability. R-value indicates the window's overall insulating value. It's more familiar than the U-factor. The higher the R-value and the lower the U-factor; the better a window can keep your home cool in summer and warm in winter. Performance judgments show how well the windows kept out 25-mph wind at different outdoor temperatures and windswept rain in laboratory tests. Durability indicates how well the windows performed after two weeks of severe temperature fluctuations and intermittent spraying with water Condensation shows how well the window resists getting wet on the inside in cold weather. Ease of use covers design of handles and such. Comments identify special features and point out additional information. Price is the estimated average. Installation is extra.
Except as noted, most have handles. Double-hung models have tilt-in sashes. Screens are optional. Most windows are available in stock and custom sizes.
WINDOWS - OVERALL RATINGS: (Within types, in order of performance)
DOUBLE-HUNG WINDOWS: Marvin Clad Ultimate
$310
Aluminum clad
Very good overall. Sash handles optional. Lip on sill may interfere with air conditioner.
Andersen Tilt-Wash
$235
Vinyl clad
Very good overall. Some parts warped or loosened in durability tests. Comes in stock sizes only. Lip on sill may interfere with air conditioner.
Pella ProLine (A Consumer Reports Best Buy)
$180
Aluminum clad
Very good overall. Some parts warped or loosened in durability tests. Sash handles optional. Comes in stock sizes only.
CertainTeed Bryn Mawr II
$180
Vinyl
Very good overall. Has locks to limit sash opening and sliding halt screen. Comes in custom sizes only. Lip on sill may interfere with air conditioner.
Andersen Narroline
$205
Vinyl clad
Very good overall. Some parts warped or loosened in durability tests. No sash-tilting feature. Comes in stock sizes only.
Pozzi Clad
$370
Aluminum clad
Very good overall. Some parts warped or loosened in durability tests. Comes with full screen. Sash handles optional. Lip on sill may interfere with air conditioner.
Andersen Millennium
$415
Composite
Very good overall. Lip on sill may interfere with air conditioner. Company says unit is identical to Renewal, which is more widely available.
Survivor 5500 (Lowe's)
$155
Vinyl
Very good overall. Some parts warped or loosened in durability tests. Has locks to limit sash opening and sliding halt screen. Lip on sill may interfere with air conditioner
Crestline CrestWood
$235
Hybrid
Very good overall. Some parts warped or loosened in durability tests.
Alside UltraMaxx
$170
Vinyl
Good overall. Has locks to limit sash opening, and sliding half screen. Comes in custom sizes only.
Caradco Guardian
$265
Aluminum clad
Good overall. Some parts warped or loosened in durability tests. Lip on sill may interfere with air conditioner. Comes in stock sizes only.
WeatherShield Visions 2000
$240
Vinyl
Good overall. Has locks to limit sash opening.
WeatherShield WeatherShield
$220
Vinyl clad
Good overall. Some parts warped or loosened in durability tests. Lip on sill may interfere with air conditioner.
Crestline VinylCrest
$195
Vinyl
Good overall. Some parts warped or loosened in durability tests. Lip on sill may interfere with air conditioner.
American Craftsman 8500 (Home Depot)
$175
Vinyl
Good overall. Some parts warped or loosened in durability tests. Has locks to limit sash opening and sliding halt screen. Lip on sill may interfere with air conditioner
Wenco Series 8
$150
Vinyl
Good overall. Some parts warped or loosened in durability tests. Lip on sill may interfere with air conditioner.
CASEMENT WINDOWS: Andersen
$280
Vinyl clad
Very good overall. Some parts warped or loosened in durability tests. Comes in stock sizes only.
CertainTeed Bryn Mawr II
$290
Vinyl clad
Very good overall. Some parts warped or loosened in durability tests. Comes with full screen. Comes in custom sizes only.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
NEWSPAPER REPLACEMENT WINDOWS ARTICLE 12/00: According to the Remodelors Council of the National Association of Home Builders, replacing windows is one of the most common home-improvement projects in the country. The most popular time to install replacement windows is from early fall through December, but installers work through the winter, especially if we have a warm spell. Buying new windows can be a daunting task. Choosing the right one for your home and budget can be a job in itself. Many of today's high-performance windows are three to four times more energy-efficient than windows commonly installed 10 years ago. With the improved efficiency comes lots of choices.
CUSTOM-MADE VS. STOCK WINDOWS: Most dealers recommend custom-made replacement windows because they are made to fit exactly in existing openings. There will be no spaces to fill in and your viewing areas will not be reduced. Stock windows are generally used for new home construction or additions.
LOW-EMITTANCE (LOW-E) COATINGS: A low-E coating is a microscopically thin metal or metallic oxide coating that is applied to the glass by the manufacturer. It helps keep heat and ultraviolet rays from passing through the window. Virtually invisible, low-E coatings will keep the house warmer in winter by reducing heat loss and cooler in summer by blocking heat from the sun. Most manufacturers apply the coating to the glass after it is made. Some manufacturers have begun applying the coating to the glass while it is being made. The newer application is called LoE2. Standard low-E glass has a tendency to hold heat longer. When you're cooling your home, it takes longer to cool down if it has low-E glass. This can be a problem in Southern states where they're more concerned about cooling. Applying the coating while the glass is being manufactured eliminates this problem. The newer low-E coatings are clearer than the older low-E coatings. While most dealers recommend low-E, Consumer Reports magazine (October 2000) says that low-E coating isn't essential in northern climates.
GAS FILLING: The gas in the gap between the panes determines the window's insulating value. Plain air works and is standard in some windows. Many dealers recommend a heavier gas such as argon. Argon makes windows more energy efficient because it's better than air at reducing heat transfer between the inside and the outside of the home. Some manufacturers offer more exotic gases such as krypton for better insulation. However, this option isn't seen very often and most dealers say it's not worth the extra cost. In a few years, krypton may come down in price. Often the manufacturers will offer a package that includes low-E and argon gas. The package usually costs about $50 more a window.
DOUBLE-GLAZED WINDOWS: Double-glazed windows have a sealed space between two panes of glass to provide an added layer of insulation. Compared with a single pane, double-glazing can cut heat loss nearly in half.
TRIPLE-GLAZED WINDOWS: Triple-glazed windows have an even higher insulating value, but add to the weight and cost of the windows. Some dealers believe it isn't worth the extra expense for triple-glazed windows. The greatest benefit from triple-pane is that it's a sound deadener, and unless you live close to a highway, it isn't recommended.
WELDED FRAMES: Most dealers recommend frames that are welded over those that are mechanically fastened or screwed together. A welded frame is about $25 more per window, but is a stronger frame and worth the extra money. Look for neat, well-bonded joints at the corners of the frame.
FRAME INSULATION: The Efficient Windows Collaborative, a group of insulation and window manufacturers that comply with federal energy requirements, also recommends choosing replacement window frames that are insulated. Foam insulation can be added to the hollow areas of vinyl window frames when they are manufactured. The least-efficient frames are metal without insulation, while insulated vinyl, fiberglass and wood frames are more efficient. Traditionally, aluminum has been used to create the separation between the two panes of glass, but aluminum conducts heat and cold and sometimes causes condensation to form. New materials are available that are better insulators and make the overall window more efficient and result in less condensation.
AIR INFILTRATION AND AIR LEAKAGE: Choose a window that has been tested for air infiltration. The air infiltration rate is the amount of air that passes through a square foot of window area under specific environmental conditions. The lower the air infiltration rate, the lower the amount of air passing through the window and thus the less heat loss. The Efficient Windows Collaborative recommends selecting windows that have an air leakage rating of 0.3 or below. They recommend selecting windows with even lower values for windy sites.
U-VALUE AND R-VALUE: The U-value is a measure of the amount of heat that flows through the window. The lower the U-value, the less heat will be lost through the window. The National Fenestration Rating Council rates the energy efficiency of windows. It recommends a U-value of 0.4 or lower. The window's U-value should be listed on the label attached to it. You can also look at a window's R-value or resistance factor. The R-value is similar to the rating used in insulation. It is the inverse of the U-factor. The higher the R factor, the greater the amount of insulation a window provides. The type of glass, thickness, number of panes, distance between panes, as well as the manner in which the panes are connected, all affect the R-factor performance of the window.
SOLAR HEAT-GAIN: Solar heat-gain is the amount of heat that radiates through windows from the outdoors. Windows are rated in decimals from 0 to 1. A high number means the window allows the sun's heat to get indoors, which is desirable in colder climates but not in warmer climates.
VISIBLE LIGHT TRANSMISSION: Visible light transmission is the amount of visible light entering a room. Figures range from 0 to 1 and the higher the number, the more light allowed in.
ENERGY LABELS: Alaska, California, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington and Wisconsin require windows to be certified by the NFRC and labeled with the results. Many windows bear the NFRC label even though it's not required. Currently, only the window's U-factor needs to be on the NFRC label. But as of January 2001, certification will require labels to display figures for solar heat gain and visible light transmittance.
ENERGY STAR LABELS: Some window manufacturers participate in the government-sponsored Energy Star labeling program. The Energy Star labels use data from the NFRC label to identify windows suitable for specific regions. You can look at the map on the Energy Star label and determine whether the window may be efficient for your area.
CREDIBILITY OF CONTRACTOR: The installation is as important as the windows you choose. A high percentage of a replacement window's efficiency is in how it's installed. It's important to choose an installer with a proven track record.
WARRANTIES: Be sure to understand the manufacturer's warranties. Lots of companies claim to have a "lifetime warranty," but you can't assume that lifetime warranty means everything. Read the warranty and determine whether it covers such things as screens, hardware and glass. Also, it's important to know whether the warranty is pro-rated or whether you'll get a replacement at no cost if there is a problem.
COST: Depending on the features you choose, you can pay anywhere from $150 to $500 a window. Some owners choose to do all their windows at once, and some choose to do a few at a time. Some prices include installation and some do not. Be sure to check.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bobb that is a complete review by Consumers Reports but one flaw in their Payback calculations is our much higher gas prices which have a continued long term outlook of faster rising prices. So your payback is much less then they state.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.