Window shades & cat

I want a insulating window shade for a west facing window, but my cat claws any fabric shades. Are there any good wood or metal shades that also insulates from heat well?
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Get your cat declawed. Rick

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wrote:
-> Get your cat declawed. -> Rick -> Absolutely DO NOT get your cat declawed. It's a horrible and painful process. Some cats never recover, emotionally. Some suffer horrible infections after the surgery.
--
8^\~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail)
~~~~~~
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Suzie-Q wrote:

Our Orange tabby is neutered, declawed when he was VERY young. He is 100% indoor cat. Never had any health issues. Now 11 years old. Wooden blind(it's quite think)? He may scratch that too.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net says...

cats will hardly notice. I've had three cats done recently (past two years) and a few more *years* ago. No problems with any. The most recent didn't even stop climbing and jumping after the surgery. They were groggy (neutered at the same time) the first day and slept but by the second they were bouncing all over the house, as usual. They've never been outside, but front claws aren't cat's main defense anyway. They're more or less a warning of things to come.
I suppose you don't support neutering cats either? After all, some cats will get infections from any surgery and may never "recover" emotionally from neutering either (the plan, actually ;-).
--
Keith

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OK. Shoot the cat. They are cheaper than window coverings.

Perhaps, but it's not so bad for the cat.

All the de-clawed cats I have asked simply replied, "What claws?"

In that unlikely event, see my first suggestion above.
--
:)
JR

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In article <jim.redelfs-D39B2A.11140031032006

I guess it was traumatizing for SQ. She's still emotionally unstable.

One of ours rolls over on his back exposing his belly. Most think it's cute and that he wants his belly scratched. Hah! It's bait and if you bite he'll show you what claws.

;-)
--
Keith

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Our cat has still never complained.
If you're living in a log cabin, with hand built furniture, by all means, leave the claws.
If you let the cat outside, leave the claws.
Our prior cat tunnelled her way under the carpet and took the arms off the couches. Judging by the look on her face she found the scratching post amusing.
I don't think it's horrible for the cat, but I find having our furniture destroyed pretty horrible.
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Dan Espen wrote:

I had my cat denutted and declawed in the front only on the same day. Outside of he didn't know whether to sit or stand for a few days, he got over it just fine. As for going outside, I let him out as before. All the major asskicking Mr. Kitty dishes out is done with the back claws.
With the loss of the front claws, no more torn up furniture; no more climbing up drapes; no more climbing up my leg. Actually, he still thought he had claws in the front, as he would still visit the scratching post to pat it every now and then.
Emotionally? I'm sure he blamed the vet; not me. Hell... I saved him from whatever other devious plans the vet had for him.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

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"Soft Paws" are glue on rubber caps for cat claws. They stay on for months at a time. Cat can try all it wants but won't be able to shred anything.
http://www.softpaws.com /
-rev
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At least trim your cat's claws. Ours gets a weekly nail trim. Makes her more house compatable. Being done each week, she gets quite used to it, doesn't mind at all, becomes part of grooming. Just to make it even easier for the cat, it is done when she is just wakened from a sound sleep that way she is still groggy and has little resistance in her.

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I don't think claw trimming really works, but when I used it, I found covering the cats head with a towel very helpful.
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On 30 Mar 2006 18:40:58 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@bresnan.net wrote:

I think there is something called a cat converter that will make your problems just blow away in the breeze.
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