Window film to block heat?

Anyone have any experience with any of the film products that you can apply to windows to block heat? Looking for something that doesn't darken the window much, but blocks 50%+ of the heat. Interested in any experience with one product vs another, the ones that use adhesive vs those that just cling, how long they last, etc....
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

If applied on double pane window it can damage the glass due to heat build up voiding warranty. Single pane, you can apply and properly done it lasts long time.
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On 4/24/2011 5:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I did it with Gila platinum brand for single panes around my front door for heat and cool. Appears to work but I found it impossible to get completely smooth and all bubbles out. It's applied wet and non-adhesive but stays put. Small windows with permanent curtain inside and does not look that bad but I would not apply it to a big window if worried about defects.
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On 4/24/2011 5:53 PM, Frank wrote:

I had a similar experience. Probably not very effective insulation. We ended up replacing all our windows with argon gas double pane windows.
Jim
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On 4/24/2011 7:23 PM, JimT wrote:

I thought about this but wooden panels above and below windows are not insulated and I asked installer that was doing the rest of the house if they could construct a big over-all frame of glass and he said there would be moisture problems and recommended the film.
It did appear a little warmer around the door this winter but I made no temperature measurements.
You confirm what I thought is that flaw free installation of the film is difficult if not impossible.
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<snip>

Not if you know what you are doing, especially on flat glass.
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Everything is easy if you know what you're doing, and that requires previous experience. Most of the window film stuff is a one shot deal - either get it right the first time or peel it off and throw it away. It's not impossible by any means, it just has a learning curve and that either leads to a flawed installation or repeated attempts. I've never used the cling film so I don't know the particulars on that stuff.
R
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On 4/25/2011 12:16 PM, RicodJour wrote:

I noticed that the film laid flat easily. The only problem I had was getting it even on the edges. I followed the instructions as closely as possible but the edges still came out a little ragged.
I think the best way is to pre-cut the film and apply it and then don't make any adjusting cuts.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
2QdNHtb_8
In the video it says cut to "approximate" size then make adjustments. After actually doing it I'd say cut as close as possible, apply and live with the results. The film sticks well and even if it overlaps the window frame a bit I think it would hold up as long as everything is clean. YMMV. Not all frames are created equal.
Jim
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

We put film on the patio door of a duplex. The doors had a western exposure.
Comparing the difference between the filmed door and the un-filmed one (they were ten feet apart), the result was dramatic.
Using a remote sensing thermometer, the temperature difference between the two was as much as 20F!
If your only hesitation is getting the film applied flawlessly, then have a commercial outfit perform the task.
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wrote:

I've used a number over the years and they do work well. The stuff looks simple to apply, but if you don't want to be looking at your mistakes (through your mistakes?) hire a pro to do it. There are a lot of films out there, with different colors and shading/blocking properties, so the best thing to do is to get samples from the installers or manufacturers so you can see exactly what you'll be getting. At times I've been tempted to get something based on the specs, but when push came to shove I, or the owner, chose something that wouldn't block as much light. I've never used the cling ones for anything other than decoration - the film should be permanent, right? The water-activated adhesive is your best bet.
R
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In typed:

Seem to last a long time. The ones on my porches are no approaching 8 years & going fine. It's the cling type; wet & roll down.
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Alternatively, you could consider external sunshades. . . .
When my new windows were installed to "energy-efficient" specs, including coatings (choice of two variants, to retain winter warmth or repel summer heat) I was surprised to discover they also barred radio waves. My wireless modem used to look through a window but now "sees" better through a solid timber wall.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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your window "coatings" are a thin metal film,that's why the windows block RF. the film is put down by vapor deposition.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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wrote:

Are windows dual pane glass, you can break the glass with film from temperature differences from the sunlight, some manufacturers state their warranty is voided from films, warranty exclusions details you usualy have to request. If it was on the outside it would be safe but the film probably wont last long.
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