Window condensation / sweats

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Concrete slab, no basement and I don't own humidifier.
jolt wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

I can never remember if the indoor/outdoor air films are already counted in the R-value of the glass.
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wrote:

Your right I should use my reading glasses when I use a Psychometric Chart. At 37 degrees the glass temperature reaching dew point is more likely. Dry bulb wet bulb temps with my background were use to calculate superheat or subcool.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

For the 1st year, there will be excess humidity in the building materials in the new house ... it'll likely calm down about in the 2nd year ... that was my experience. In the meantime, if you don't have power ventilation, you'll have to make do somehow ... crack a window open maybe. In my case, the new house attached to the old house, so I put an opening at the top of the adjoining wall letting that excess humidity go into the dry, leaky old house next door ... an excellent solution :-)
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bowgus wrote:

Lol good advice, i sound like a parrot
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bowgus wrote:

I find that true to some extent. Maybe not a year, but in this case the owner has measured humidity at 30%. Of course it may not have been an accurate measure.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

The colder an environment, the more noticable the mositure of new construction. Ventilatiojn schems like an HRV will work overtime the first winter after new construction in a cold climate. The next winter they can over ventilate to the point people want to add humidifiers
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Have you spoken to your neighbors as of yet?
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avid_hiker wrote:

Not yet, but the good news is that the problem is gone. Here is what I did.
I had my wife circulate the air by opening the back door for fresh air and put the fan "on" instead of "auto". By the time I got back from work, I had to clean up the water but I haven't seen the problem again for last few days. I also got two hygrometers, one analog and one digital, and they had ranged between 35% to 42% at given moment. Even with the wide range I think I was still at near "dry" condition.
I believe the main problem was the rapid drop in temperature in addition to new construction in first winter. I took the reading in bathroom when I took a shower and it was at 53% (highest). I ran the bathroom fan for about 30 minutes and it went down to 33%. I think I'm gonna use the fan during shower during winter.
Thanks guys.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

There is a lot of moisture of construction in a new home, and a lot of the energy efficiency windows may have what can appear to be high R-values, but this tends to be for the centre of the glass. The frames can short circuit a lot of heat and sometimes they may have metal spacers separating the panes of glass. Metal frames would be just asking for it.
U-shaped condensation patterns are common as the windows are a lot colder around the edges than in the middle of the glass.
New homes can be fairly air tight, and in the winter the people can become their own humdifiers, but this is more common in the North.
You may have to ventilate a lot during this first winter. Hopefully you have bathroom fans vented to the outside. As an experiment try cracking open one window and running a bathroom fan steady to see if the dry air can drop your RH enough to stop the condensation.
Getting the glass warmer will help too. Try keeping the drapes open at night, this keeps the windows a little warmer. Bay windows are always the most prone to the condensation.
If running a fan during the cold weather does not lower the RH, maybe check that you are not creating the moisture yourself. Lots of plants being watered, simmering foods for a long time, hang drying clothes inside the house etc.
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Either the windows/frames are having problems, or your hygrometer (clock) is wrong.
I'd pick up another hygrometer to just to be sure.
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