Window Condensation

I live in 5 month old house. I have condensation on the windows that covers half the window. The window seal also has condensation on it. It's thick that I need to wipe it off with a cloth. Does anyone know what could be causing it?????
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buffalo ny: high humidity subject to your climate, byproduct of combustion, ineffective bathroom ventilation, uninsulated glass windows, and furnace humidifier gone wild. -b
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wrote:

Humidity in the home moves toward colder areas in the home. You can increase ventilation--draw back draperies/blinds, use a fan, turn furnace blower always ON, etc. I have condensation too, but only on days that fall below 20 degrees (not too many days like that here)--then I just wipe the sills a couple times a day.
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If it's extremely cold out and you're heating your house up, then the laws of physics say your air will be naturally dry and you will have no condensation. If condensation is occurring, it's because you're adding moisture to the air and the inner pane of your windows is much colder than the inside of the house. (This really shouldn't be the case either.)
To the OP: feel the inner glass of your windows; if it's *very* cold, your windows aren't very good and will condense easily. Only real solutions are to cut down the humidity or replace the windows. (If your house is older, you could try to fix them up, but the OP's house isn't.) If your windows *aren't* that cold and are still condensing, then there's a problem with overly high humidity levels in the house.
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On Jan 9, 4:39 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

The suggestion that your house may not adequete ventilation may be right on. However, also consider that if your house is only five months old, then there could be residual moisture from the construction--in concrete, framing lumber, drywall, tilework, etc. Maybe run a dehumidifier for a few weeks to try to dry it out a bit.
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Do you have an air exchanger? you might have it at the wrong setting.
(Maybe) If its a new house, it may not be 100% cured. Was drywall done lately or other work? no more spaghetti for a week! :)
cln
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If you have a humidifier turn it off, get a digital humidistat, analog ones need calibration. condensation can lead to mold and rot. Maybe your glass or windows are not very good or the house it to tight for for all the activity and you need venting or fresh air, start by turning off the humidifier.
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