Window air conditioner

Does it hurt to store a window air conditioner sideways, on it's back, backwards or upside down?
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LSMFT

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Window AC's have the same issue as refrigerators: If stored other than in an upright position, you need to let the compressor oil settle back before you operate it.
I've heard time frames that range from 1 hour to 24 for a window AC.
re: "backwards"
I doubt it matters which direction the front faces.
re: "upside down, on it's side, etc"
Probably not a good idea, no matter how long you plan to let it "settle". I'm thinking that the unit was designed and components were placed/attached based on it being in an upright position. The weight of some components hanging at an "unatural" angle might be an issue.
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On 10/1/2010 12:06 PM, LSMFT wrote:

Window air conditioners have no nervous system and can feel no pain. The AC unit does have a compressor with a crankcase containing oil that should be kept upright to prevent oil from migrating out of the crankcase into the evaporator(cold)coil and tubing which would cause the unit to malfunction when put back into service. It's best to store it in an upright position.
TDD
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On Fri, 01 Oct 2010 13:06:00 -0400, LSMFT wrote:

As long as you let it sit in its normal position for a day or so before you use it, no.
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Save a buck and try to store it in the upright position.
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I have 4 window units and have been storing them on their backs for the last 6 years with no problem. After storage, I put them in the window and allow to sit for several hours. They work flawlessly.
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On 10/2/2010 9:15 AM, SBH wrote:

If stored on their backs, the oil isn't likely to run into any of the tubing unless the suction line connection to the compressor is toward the rear. I have turned them on their sides when cleaning them so the water drains when I'm hosing them out.
TDD
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On Sat, 02 Oct 2010 10:20:49 -0500, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Oil in the lines isn't much of a problem anyways. And if left in their normal position for a few hours it's even less of a problem. However I see no reason to store one on it's face or upside down. I can't recall seeing a suction line in the rear (no pun intended) but i have seen some coiled to make sure any liquid R22 remaining as a mist was flashed off before it hit the valve plate.
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On 10/2/2010 12:32 PM, Meat Plow wrote:

I've repaired enough of those damn things over the past four decades to have seen just about screwy thing happen to them. Way back in the day, window units, like color TV's were very expensive and worth repairing. Now small window units are like small microwave ovens, the labor charge can be more than a new unit costs. I remember a guy who owned a TV shop who would take a transistor radio from a customer who wanted it repaired, he looked at it, dropped it on the floor, stomped it to pieces, turned to a shelf, picked up a new one then handed it to the stunned customer and said, that will be $7.95 please. 8-)
TDD
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On Sun, 03 Oct 2010 01:18:33 -0500, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Some of the bigger units 12k+ BTU still are worth repairing. But people tend to leave those in place. Or they are mounted in a thru-the-wall casement. But like you say they aren't worth repair these days. Not when you can buy a 5k BTU unit that will cool 600 or so sq feet for $69.99 at WallyMart.
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On 10/3/2010 7:59 AM, Meat Plow wrote:

My service call on stuff like an AC unit is $65.00 not including parts. When someone calls or asks me about repairs to commodity items, I ask them if they priced a new one. I tell them the truth, calling a repair tech to come out may cost more than a new unit. If I happen to be there for another service, I'll be glad to take a look at it but unless it's a simple problem I won't spend the time. They can donate it to Goodwill or some such place.
TDD
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On 10/3/2010 5:36 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Uh, NO! Last thing Goodwill and other charities need/want is busted appliances. The landfill costs they pay for people using them as a disposal point take a BIG chunk out of their proceeds.
Try the free section on CL, or FreeCycle, but make sure you say it needs work. If no takers, pay the fee (or a small bribe) to your regular trash hauler, or stick it in a corner until the next local hazmat/oddball large stuff pickup day.
--
aem sends...

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wrote:

HVAC companies here, at least some, drop off large compressors to a local guy and he dismantles the units for the metal. It cost him nothing, the company doesn't have to deal with them and he makes some money on metal recycle.
Many are off commercial building roof tops using a crane. The local guy wins all around.
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There are some folks who make good money from hauling scrap.
That's good all around, the HVAC guy gets a free drop off, and the scrap guy gets the money from the metals.
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In article

And don't forget the extra added advantage of having fewer people helped since GW has to pay the costs associated with getting rid of the NWAs.
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