Window A/C unit - drill holes in water pan ?

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I know that newer units don't have drain holes and the outside fan actually dips in to the water pan to assist in heat dispersement.
My problem is that every damn fall, I end up getting some water on the rugs inside and it's cruddy rusty water. I try to tip the unit before bringing it in and get as much outside as possible, but I always end up getting some inside.
If I drill a hole to allow the water to drain, will the unit end up overheating ? I can't imagine it would since there is the possibility of these things running on hot days that aren't very humid - hence no or minimal water being kicked back up.
Any input is appreciated on this.
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Mark wrote:

Dripping was a real problem with the older units. It usually ended up putting a long rust mark on your home under the A/C unit. My guess is that the water you are seeing is rain water, not that that is going to help you any. I don't know if it would cause any problems (other than possible stain problems on your home, and like you I would guess not.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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I beleive newer units dont drain to increase efficiency by allowing the fan fo splash water back on the coil. There are holes in the case but the pan isnt supposed to drain so it is a water holding tray . Why not put down a drop cloth or plastic and towels when removing it. Many years ago I drilled a hole in my air conditioner case becase the other holes were clogged and rusted, well I drilled into the coil, luckily I got it resoldered for very cheap . But be carefull if you decide to drill a hole. With the way they are now designed now I would not drill a hole. Just make sure all are clean and you have it properly angled to have proper design drainage
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On Wed, 5 May 2004 08:15:43 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

This is correct, however I'm wondering if lack of water will cause the unit to overheat. I suspect not, just that the cooling may not be as efficient. I also suspect that the "lesser efficient" colling will be unnoticeable to me.

Because it's such a mess and I'd rather just yank them out and stuff them in the closet. Also, by drilling a hole or two, this would get most/all of the water out so I don't have anything stagnant sitting in the closet for months growing mold.

I'm surprised that it wasn't a throw-away since you'd also have to have the system recharged again also. Fortunately for me, there is lots of space and I don't think I could hit anything with my short bits even if I tried.
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Go for it. And put a plastic 55 gallon drum on the ground under the hole with a rainwater supply hose to a downspout and wire some 1/2" vinyl tubing with holes along the top of the condensor coil and put a 10 W fountain pump in the drum to drip rainwater/condensate over the coils when it is running.
I've done this for 2 years now. The pump drops the total power from 050 to 950 W and the output air temp from 55 to 45 F. Prof Y. Goswami at U Fl says this increases the COP by about 20%.
Nick
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Not a serious concern.
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On Wed, 05 May 2004 12:50:31 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

This is definitely not rain water - it condensate. I have an older window unit that is 220V 30K BTU and it has no problem with it's drain hole. If the unit is installed properly so that it is tilted slightly downward at the back of the unit, the water will not drip back on the house.
I think the drill will be coming out on these suckers. I was just wondering if there was some solid info that would prevent me from doing this.
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This is Turtle.
Most all window shakers now days [ made in the last 15 years or so ] depend on the water in the back to help it cool in hot weather. If the temperature in your area never goes over 90F you maybe get by without the water in the back but it will cost you a little more on electricity cost to run it.
Now everytime I see or tell someone they could drill a hole in the back to let the water out. They drill a hole in the freon lines and blow the freon out. With this thought in mine, Drill a hole in the back and then put you a rubber plug to take out when you want to take it out of the window and replace it when you put it back in the window. The only problem would be getting a plug the right size to fit the hole you have in it. The only one i seen that worked was a PVC fitting JB welded to the bottom back side and then put a PVC plug to unscrew to let the water out. Now on most the have the metal base frame to go theough and the water is held in a plastic pan. This will be the problem getting though the metal base and tie on to the plastic pan.
If all possible, try to live with the water in it every year and deal with.
TURTLE
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That's not a bad idea of using a plug. My only concern is that these unit are not accessible from the outside ground and I'd have to dance with it in the window opening to pull the drain plug.
I can run with this I think.......thanks!
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Mark wrote:

My window AC had a similar problem due to rainwater coming off the apartment block's roof. I could never get the landlord to really deal with it (same idiots had the roof redone during thunderstorm season, but that's another story), and eventually I just made a "handle" for the damn thing using a special hinge where one plate recesses into the other. When attached to a piece of equipment, it makes an uncomfortable but usable (heck, twice a year) carrying handle. I found this sufficient to allow me to tilt the whole box down and out enough to drain the pan before bringing it inside, and the handle also made installation a much easier one-person job.
I was inspired by my first AC, a so-called "portable" unit with a plastic molded handle. It was puny, though.
I could never understand why they make the *smaller* ACs with handles, but the *bigger* ACs with no handles at all. Unless it's all about the profit from replacements when the AC falls out during installation ...
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Hi,
A copy....
Q - My air conditioner never drips any water out the back, isn't it suppose to?
A - *Most room air conditioners are designed NOT to drip water out the back. The condenser fan blade has a ring built into it to pick up the water and "sling" the water against the hot condenser tubing to help keep the coils cooler when the unit is running.
This slinger can sometimes be heard "swooshing" the water around when the fan is running. This is one way modern a/c are use less hydro be reusing the cooler water to help cool the hot coils.
* Usually only larger unit's may have a drain spout on the back of the a/c.
We see 5-6 units a year with a hole drilled through the refrigerant tubing = BIG$$$ repair!!!!
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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This is Turtle.
Everything you say is correct but one on the water not coming out. Here is Louisiana when we have 100% RH / Humitity the window units will just about run the water out in a pure stream. They will put out 1 to 3 gal. per hour of water a hour and the slinger ring and coil will not use all the water. Now get off the Gulf Coast and all you say is true.
Now if you hit the right place in the back of the unit. Repairing it can be too high to even try to fix it.
TURTLE
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Hi Turtle,
I don't know what brand, type or size of window a/c you have but this is a sample from the Fedders web site:
Fedders X Chassis 5-8,000 BTU models - 1.4 *pints* per hour.
http://www.fedders.com/catalog/appliances/img/specs_fed_x.gif
Fedders D Chassis 17,300 to 28,500 BTUs - 5.6 -10.2 *pints* per hour
http://www.fedders.com/catalog/appliances/img/specs_fed_d.gif
I agree that an air conditioner may not e able to evaporate all that water but what is able to be used helps with the cooling and removing it would make the unit less efficient at doing its job.
JFYI
Dan O. - Appliance411.com http://ng.Appliance411.com/?ref411=air+conditioner
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There was a map that someone posted a couple days ago on another group. Showed where swamp coolers work (western US) where they are iffy (central) and useless (Eastern states and coastal CA/WA). If you have humid summers, the outdoor wet cooling action is going to be minimal.
I've got two window shakers here in NY, and keep thinking that someday I'm going to drill drain holes.
Like Turtle says, don't drill from the outside. Too easy to hit a freon line.
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Put a towel or tarp on the carpet. How hard can that be?
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It's a PITA. There is a significant amount of water that comes out of these. I've never had to deal with this water problem on older units.
Simply put, there's no need for it.
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replying to Chuckles, Misplacedhippie wrote:

Putting a tarp or towel down won't do much good if the water is running down the wall. 😞
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On 6/7/2015 10:44 AM, Misplacedhippie wrote:

Obviously a post out of the distant past since I can't seem to find anything else on this subject.
How about proper installation of the A/C unit. It's supposed to be slightly tilted so that the water runs out of the unit onto the ground or folks walking beneath it<g>
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On Sun, 07 Jun 2015 11:10:26 -0500, Unquestionably Confused

That's right. There probably is a hole in the water pan already at the outside end of the AC. And there is probably a provision for attaching a small hose, to route the drip where the owner wants it. If no hole, one could drill one there, but only if it's tipped like you say.
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On Sunday, June 7, 2015 at 1:23:05 PM UTC-4, micky wrote:

I think you're tipped...
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