Wind powered car

Page 5 of 5  
Marty wrote:

Be careful though in case someone offers and wants to use post holes for the shipping containers. Last I heard those darn things are a bear to get rid of if you don't need them.
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Can't you just bury them in your back yard?
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Neill Massello wrote:

I forget what the problem was, never had to deal with them myself. Something like trying to bury tires or big rocks IIRC. I'm sure someone will come up with the right answer.
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On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 00:37:57 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Neill Massello) wrote:

Only if you turn half of them inside out. Otherwise, you get a well. Or I suppose you could line them up one layer deep and make a wading pool.
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

I thought of doing something like that.
I believe my variation would work.

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They could build electric roads. Every car would have a battery and a coil under the car. Coils would be buried under all major roads. As you drive along the road would charge the vehicle.
VERY COSTLY to implement, but no exhaust.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

And at a great loss in energy time you add up all the losses involved at the generating plant, the transmission lines, driving the car, etc.
Using electricity to charge batteries, then converting it to driving power is a lossy proposition. Those proposing hybrids or even all electric overlook the economics of the process. Unless gasoline goes really outragious, IMO the internal combustion engine will remain the most economical way to power a car.
Note that the current rebates and tax write offs for hybrids are disguising one major problem. Cost originally becomes competitive with standard cars but then comes time to replace the batteries...
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

The hybrid is kind of neat around town but on the highway the straight drive will win every time.
Hydrogen is not all it is being touted to be either. It takes tanks four times as large as that used by gasoline to hold the same energy.
Tax Rebates to subsidize Japanese auto industry while the American industries go bankrupt not to mention the ridiculous trade deficit!!
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On Sun, 26 Mar 2006 03:15:09 +0000, Rich256 wrote:

I had this argument a couple of weeks ago. It seems that some (Ford) have designed the engine so it has less torque at the low end, relying on the electrics for the start-up. They can then get away with a smaller engine (less low-end torque, anyway) than the equivalent straight-drive car, saving fuel on the highway too.

It's not as dangerous as the nay-sayers believe either. The problem with hydrogen is availability.

US car manufacturers can build hybrids too. ...not that I'm in favor of these subsidies.
--
Keith

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