Will hydrogen balloons come back?

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This is going to have the opposite result, of course. Helium for MRI scanners will, uh, balloon in price because the price for helium for recreation will be high. Same thing happened with corn. Corn for eating is expensive today because so much corn is being diverted into the more profitable biodiesel market.
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On Sat, 22 Sep 2012 01:05:23 -0700, "David Kaye"

Not around here. Baltiomre. I only see them for sale at a dollar store, and since there is one chain of "dollar" stores where most things cost more than a dollar, I figured they were charging more too, but no, only a dollar, and I've never noticed them not selling. Oh, yeah, they have them at the supermarket too, probably for a lot more. They are always up at the ceiling with strings hanging down. And I almost never see anyone at checkout with one. I wonder if the helium leaks out after they've been filled, and how long that takes.
Maybe there is a little bit of sour grapes here, but I'm probably actually fortnate at my age, 65, to have had even one helium ballooon as a child, and that's what I had, one. When we were out of town. I had to let it go before the 4 hour drive back (although now I think I really could have kept it.) Still one is enough to learn all there is to know that helium balloons teach. Children don't get more pleasure out of 10 than out of one.

Seems to me thtey have been able in the past to apply an excise tax to some uses and not to others. If MRI's need helium, it's no secret who has an operating MRI, or even how many images they take each month.
Maybe if the balloon use dropped by 90 or 98% that would drive the price down for MRIs,etc.
Maybe we could have ration cards for helium balloons and every person could get one at a the untaxed price, maybe a dollar, and then have to pay 10 dollars tax for every balloon after that.
Someday we will run out of the stuff.

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wrote:

except that sweet corn isn't used in ethanol production
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On Sat, 22 Sep 2012 11:49:43 -0700, "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds"

Nope but corn is in just about everything we eat and most is not sweet corn. Meat is corn, sweeteners are corn, there is a lot of corn meal in foods and we use tons of corn starch. The list goes on.
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wrote:

Taking the statement "corn for eating is expensive today because so much corn is being diverted..." to actually mean CORN and not a corn product, no table/sweet corn is used in the production of anything but a complete meal, soup or snack.
Also soybeans are used a lot for most of the same purposes and don't forget that the DDGS get used as cattle feed
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On Sat, 22 Sep 2012 21:59:48 -0700, "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds"

You still eat the other corn products. For that matter sweet corn is higher too but the big price hike is in meat. That feed corn is competing directly with ethanol.
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wrote:

Never denied it

do we really have to go over the process in which field corn is turned into alcohol and the leavings, DDGS, are sold as cattle feed that has a higher nutritional level than unprocessed corn and sells for about the same price as field corn?
all of your statements may be true, except in relevance to the price of table corn. Table corn generates more income than field corn so even an attempt to make the table corn price higher because farmers are taking table corn out to replace it with field corn is just plain wrong.
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The Dollar Tree stores near me were without helium for a while. OTOH, hydrogen is fairly easy to make.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I was talking to a balloon shop lady the other day and she said they were having trouble getting any. The places that sell the party balloons like grocery stores and flower shops are tacking on another 50 cents to a buck on the price.
I was just wondering if big balloon users like advertisers and weather balloons might switch to hydrogen. So what if the giant floating gumby went up in a big fireball. The fire would all go up.
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So, you think the tax system should be used to change peoples behaviour? Sounds like you are a liberal. Get out of America, we don't need you.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
And people take advantage of the low price. Instead of one balloon, they buy 6.
It makes me sick. There should be a 2000% excise tax on non-indurstial uses of helium.
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On 9/22/2012 9:29 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Yes because only the wealthy should be allowed to waste helium on a birthday balloon.
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(attribution corrected)
wrote in message

Yes because only the wealthy should be allowed to waste helium on a birthday balloon.
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On Sat, 22 Sep 2012 10:57:50 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Actually, Mormons should get all the helium. Then they should be forced to breathe it for a half hour or more. What better way to rid the world of Mormon cultists, particularly Romney.....
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On Sat, 22 Sep 2012 10:57:50 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
If you don't like people misquoting, perhaps it would be a good idea to use a standard format? Top posting sucks and you make it worse than most.
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kr williams (krw @ att.bizz) wrote:

and so does full-quoting.
The standard format for a usenet reply is to NOT drag the entire thread into each and every reply you post.
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On Sat, 22 Sep 2012 10:32:50 -0400, Fred Jones

A scientist cited in one of the urls here http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-19676639 thinks the price shouldn't just be 10 or 20 dollars like I said but 120 dollars. If the price were that high, they wouldn't be selling HE balloons anywhere and rich people wouldn't be buying them either. Which would be filne with me.
But if the price is lower and only the wealthy could buy them, that's better than everyone doing so. HE balloons are not a necessity of life. They barely add even a smidgen to the quality of life, and watching a video of a HE balloon going to the right side of the car when a speeding car turns right is good enough. No one has to see it in person, anymore than he has to go to the moon in person. .
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wrote:

I didnt read the whole article. If this is true, and more importantly if it's true in the US too, and he doesn't say so, (he's referring only to the UK) that would make a big difference:
"But John Lee, the association's chairman insisted that the helium its members put into balloons, was not depriving the medical profession of the gas.
"The helium we use is not pure," he said. "It's recycled from the gas which is used in the medical industry, and mixed with air. We call it balloon gas rather than helium for that reason.
"There is no way the balloon and party industry would even consider taking badly-needed helium from the medical profession. That is important - people have to come first.
"If I thought this industry was taking helium away from the medical profession, I would be looking at doing things differently." "
I think they seel a lot more balloons in the US than could possibly come from recycled medical industry gas. I'm figuring the gas in an MRI is changed once a week, when really it seems like it could last for months, or maybe it's once a day, but I doubt it.
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You're ignorant, don't check facts, and want to tell people how to behave, based on your lack of knowledge? I think that's dangerous.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I didnt read the whole article. If this is true, and more importantly if it's true in the US too, and he doesn't say so, (he's referring only to the UK) that would make a big difference:
"But John Lee, the association's chairman insisted that the helium its members put into balloons, was not depriving the medical profession of the gas.
"The helium we use is not pure," he said. "It's recycled from the gas which is used in the medical industry, and mixed with air. We call it balloon gas rather than helium for that reason.
"There is no way the balloon and party industry would even consider taking badly-needed helium from the medical profession. That is important - people have to come first.
"If I thought this industry was taking helium away from the medical profession, I would be looking at doing things differently." "
I think they seel a lot more balloons in the US than could possibly come from recycled medical industry gas. I'm figuring the gas in an MRI is changed once a week, when really it seems like it could last for months, or maybe it's once a day, but I doubt it.
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Who gave you authority to tell others what to do?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
But if the price is lower and only the wealthy could buy them, that's better than everyone doing so. HE balloons are not a necessity of life. They barely add even a smidgen to the quality of life, and watching a video of a HE balloon going to the right side of the car when a speeding car turns right is good enough. No one has to see it in person, anymore than he has to go to the moon in person. .
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oh come on, Palin was proud of how she was able to redistribute money from the oil companies to the citizens of Alaska

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wrote:

And ACES has beaten you
October 27, 2008
THE WEALTH SPREADERS.... Without a hint of irony, Sarah Palin has begun calling Barack Obama "Barack the Wealth Spreader." I'm not sure if typical voters, who've seen their real wages decline, and who haven't benefitted at all from a series of Republican tax cuts, will necessarily be outraged by the idea of a president offering more economic opportunities to those who've been left behind, but whatever. I'm not the McCain/Palin campaign's message consultant.
But more importantly, as Ryan Powers noted, there's the irony of Palin making these ridiculous attacks.
Just last month, in an interview with Philip Gourevitch of the New Yorker, Palin explained the windfall profits tax that she imposed on the oil industry in Alaska as a mechanism for ensuring that Alaskans "share in the wealth" generated by oil companies. [...]
In fact, Alaska's Clear and Equitable Share (ACES) program, which manages the redistribution of oil wealth in Alaska, brings in so much money that the state needs no income or sales tax. In addition, this year ACES will provide every Alaskan with a check for an estimated $3,200.
As Hendrick Hertzberg notes, "Perhaps there is some meaningful distinction between spreading the wealth and sharing it ... but finding it would require the analytic skills of Karl the Marxist."
I realize that even McCain, Palin, and Fox News don't take this "socialism" nonsense seriously, and that this is just rhetoric borne of desperation. McCain has always struggled with new ideas and a changing world, so it stands to reason he'd rely on a red scare as his closing argument.
But the truth is, Sarah Palin's Alaska is about as close to socialism as America gets. As Yglesias recently noted, "You have collective ownership of valuable natural resources that generates lots of revenue for the state, and then the government makes 'spreading the wealth around' through the Permanent Fund, etc. its main priority."
The point isn't that there's anything especially wrong with Palin-style socialism; there isn't. The point is, if McCain and Palin want to whine incessantly about socialism, redistribution of wealth, and "welfare," they ought to a) learn what they're talking about; and b) take a good look in the mirror.
http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/archives/individual/2008_10/015395.php
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jonathan-weiler/sarah-palin-must-also-fav_b_573469 . html
But Palin's criticisms of Obama's "spread the wealth" remarks are ironic, as she recently characterized Alaska's tax code in a very similar way. Just last month, in an interview with Philip Gourevitch of the New Yorker, Palin explained the windfall profits tax that she imposed on the oil industry in Alaska as a mechanism for ensuring that Alaskans "share in the wealth" generated by oil companies:
And Alaska--we're set up, unlike other states in the union, where it's collectively Alaskans own the resources. So we share in the wealth when the development of these resources occurs. ... It's to maximize benefits for Alaskans, not an individual company, not some multinational somewhere, but for Alaskans.
http://thinkprogress.org/politics/2008/10/27/31372/palin-shares-wealth/?mobile=nc
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