Wide door

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On Thursday, February 12, 2015 at 9:55:02 PM UTC-5, rbowman wrote:

No, why would I be kidding? And I'm not the only one who has suggested that.
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On Friday, February 13, 2015 at 8:05:07 AM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

As the slice gets narrower, it gets harder to use a hand held circular saw accurately. When the kerf thickness approaches the slice thickness it take s a lot of skill, or a table saw with fence. 3/16 would make me nervous, b ut a more skilled person would probably have no trouble. Less than that st arts to get into the undoable area where you need to plane it, rout it, sha pe it, etc.
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wrote:

You hold the saw guide firmly against the stop. I've taken off far less than 3/16" cleanly. Make sure the blade is sharp and go slowly, but not so slow you burn the wood. I use a carbide-tipped combo blade to rip and crosscut. You want a blade that doesn't flex easily, so don't buy a cheap blade. Most people don't have planes, and couldn't use them right if they did. Unless you're a pro planer, the saw is faster and cleaner.
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On Friday, February 13, 2015 at 5:44:31 AM UTC-8, Vic Smith wrote:

aw accurately. When the kerf thickness approaches the slice thickness it t akes a lot of skill, or a table saw with fence. 3/16 would make me nervous , but a more skilled person would probably have no trouble. Less than that starts to get into the undoable area where you need to plane it, rout it, shape it, etc.

Yep. Set the guide strep so the wide portion of the saw shoe rides on the door, Can cut even a 1/8" strip or less using a good sharp blade. Doesn't take an "expert" to do it.
Harry K
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On Friday, February 13, 2015 at 8:19:42 AM UTC-5, TimR wrote:

Which is why I and several others here, said to clamp a guide onto the door. At that point, it isn't hard at all.
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trader_4 wrote:

I meant the "3/16" is a lot of planing" part. A circular saw with a guide to take off 3/16 sounds like a splintery mess to me.
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On 2/13/2015 10:03 PM, rbowman wrote:

Good blade, guide, perfect cut. I know a guy that could easily freehand it too.
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| I meant the "3/16" is a lot of planing" part. A circular saw with a guide to | take off 3/16 sounds like a splintery mess to me. |
3/16" is a lot of planing, and there's nothing "splintery" about a circular saw cut. It's basically a hand held table saw. There could be some subtle blade marks left behind, but they're easy to take down. (This is assuming a decent blade. If you only use a circular saw for things like cutting up rubbish then you might not be using a good blade and would see "pulling" of the grain on a crosscut.)
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A. trim the door
B. make a new frame piece
"A" is a lot easier.
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On Thursday, February 12, 2015 at 1:41:48 PM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:


Not necessarily.
If the frame was built correctly, and has shifted, say maybe the top jamb h as moved 3/8th to the right, it will be impossible to trim the door correct ly. The best you can do is a symmetric 3/16 gap all around. Everything yo u trim off one corner of the door must be added to the other.
In that case, pull the casing, tap out the shims, insert new shims, level e xisting frame, reattach casing, with no cutting necessary.
If you don't do that, and you do trim the door, sooner or later the frame m ay shift further and the door will jam.
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On 2/12/2015 9:36 AM, Meanie wrote:

Thanks for the suggestions.
I already had an idea of the approach but wanted feedback.
My thought was to simply cut with circular saw and straight edge as some suggested. I also thought of the plane, but I don't have one, though, I can borrow an electric one, just not certain of the blade and not certain how straight I can get it. I ruled out sanding for obvious reasons of evenness. I also contemplated replacing the latch side of the frame to a thinner board, but that's involved work.
After routing hinges and cutting the bottom for height fitment, it was a perfect fit until I closed it. When closed (against the outside frame) the frame appears plumb along with the rest of the framing. Therefore, it's not out of square. A straight trim from the door should fit perfectly. The door is a panel door, but as was stated, removing 3/16" will not be noticeable, especially since the hinge side is against a wall at the top of stairs.
I think the best option is a straight edge w/circular saw. I would have taken it to my work where there's a big table saw, but the door is longer than my car and it would have extended out. With the wet weather and melting snow, I didn't want to ruin it from the splashing.
Thanks for the feedback.
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On 02/12/2015 1:31 PM, Meanie wrote: ...

...
Use a fine-toothed blade and place masking tape particularly on upper side to minimize tearout (altho lengthwise will be much less of an issue than if you were shortening).
I like to go ahead and also put some tape on the saw faceplate to ensure any rough spots don't leave noticeable scratches on the face.
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On Thursday, February 12, 2015 at 2:31:30 PM UTC-5, SBH wrote:


Wait, you have a router? Do it with that. Tack a straight board to your d oor as a guide. Set your bit to take a light cut. Make several passes low ering the bit each time. I bet you get better results- cleaner surface and more controllable amount - than any other method short of a planer/shaper.
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