Why you should change your vehicle to flex fuel

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Dear Everyone, as you know the price of the Oil is more and more increasing, while the oil supply is decreasing. Moreover Oil is causing wars, terror, oil spills and a lot of greenhouse gases. By upgrading your car to flex fuel, you will continue to be able to use oil. However you will also have the opportunity to use E85, that means more freedom of choice. The conversion cost is about 200-250 USD. By choosing ethanol, you choose local fuel production, which means labour for farmers, labour for enginneers and workers in the ethanol plant, labour for transportation. Moreover you also help for indirect labour. Since the money stays in your country, this money will turn and produce indirect labour. Since the farmer will gain your additional fuel money, he will buy other things (labour is again needed for their production), which in case of oil the oil-Sheikhs or their people would do. That ethanol production increases the food prices is also not totally right, first there is a by-product called "distillers dried grains with solubles", which is used as feed for livestock, that is also nothing else than food. Moreover, by using ethanol, you put pressure on oil prices, which has also an important effect on food prices. You also give your money for more research (again labour), which will yield in higher efficiency of production and alternative production methods like cellulosic ethanol, which will change the whole equation. Again in case of oil this money would be spent for oil rigs, oil- infrastructure, but also for weapons to defend the oil. By using ethanol, you produce less CO2, since it is produced by corn, which actually consumed the CO2 in the air for its growing. The more people use ethanol, the higher the efficiencies will come for production (similar to solar cells). The prices will go further down, and much less CO2 will be produced during production in the plant. Do you know that the production efficiencies already improved 30% ?* Another reason for using ethanol is that oil prices will come up again, when the barrel price of 150 USD is back you will be very happy to have your vehicle converted. The conversion also increases the value of your vehicle.
Yours sincerely.
Sources: *http://brownfieldagnews.com/2010/09/21/ethanol-production-efficiency - improves/
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== Yah, sure...no problem except that in Alberta we can't even get E5 let alone E85. We're supposed to have E5 by Dec. 13/2010 but I would bet on it. ==
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wrote:

Consider yourself lucky. There are a lot more problems caused by E fuels that get fixed by them. It is basically a farm subsidy anyway. We are burning food in our cars.
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On 11/09/10 07:53 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

50 or so years ago in UK "Cleveland Distol" (5% alcohol) was advertised widely, and I sometimes used it in my motorcycle. I don't recall anybody ever complaining. 85% alcohol is something else, of course.
Perce
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On Tue, 09 Nov 2010 21:16:12 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

Go to any of the boating groups and you will see lots of people complaining about E10 and E15 is right around the corner.
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On 11/9/2010 7:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Sure, but it is important to keep the SUVs operating. It just wouldn't make any sense to consider fuel efficiency when you need a fluffed up truck to haul yourself and a large beverage around...
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What's a fluffed up truck? Does my 1998 Honda CRV qualify? I haul myself, but rarely a beverage, because when I'm driving, I'm driving, not drinking or talking on the phone, or checking my hair. (Quick check--yes, it's still there.)
Sure, I could get by most of the time with a smaller car, and did for quite some time, but when it snows I had the devil's own time getting out of my upward-sloping driveway, and used to get stuck at work because my employer is too cheap to have the parking lot plowed in a timely fashion. I'm getting too damned old to dig my car out.
Cindy Hamilton
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On 11/10/2010 11:05 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

Fluffed up truck is a vehicle built on a truck platform and sold as a "car" such as the "yukon denali XLBG" or whatever. I think your vehicle could fit inside the typical fluffed up truck...

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wrote:

The Honda CRV, Like the Toyota Rav4 are based on a car chassis and running gear. They are the modern equivalent of what used to be called a "station wagon"
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On Nov 10, 7:37am, "Stormin Mormon"

There was a big feature in I think Smithsonian? Or Nat'l Geographic? a couple years ago that said just that. In some cases you're right, in some cases it's a wash, and in a very few cases E-fuels actually showed a net benefit. Now that is only true for the US; in South America where you can grow sugar cane it definitely is worthwhile to use ethanol instead of gasoline.
I hope that things have changed since then as I really would like to see a viable alternative to fossil fuels...
nate
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On 11/11/10 12:47 pm, N8N wrote:

The 5% alcohol in the 50-years-ago-in-UK "Cleveland Distol" I mentioned up-thread was a product of The Distillers Company, which owned many of the well-known brands of whisky and gin, so I am *assuming* (I know, I know) that the automotive ethanol was a by-product of their booze business.
Perce
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wrote:

... as long as you don't mind the ecological destruction. Brazil is draining coastal wetlands and burning the rain forest to grow sugar cane.
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On Nov 12, 1:10pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

well, yeah, there's that. But the point that I was making is that you could theoretically run all your farm equipment on ethanol and still have some left over to sell, not making any judgements about other environmental effects that may be equally as undesirable as simply wasting fuel to grow fuel.
nate
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== And the best part is...that is a RENEWABLE resource whereas the black gooey stuff coming out of the ground is not. ==
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<...snipped...>

Sort of. At the rate that some parts of the midwest are losing topsoil, they will be unable to grow corn long before we run out of oil.
--
When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
  Click to see the full signature.
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Roy wrote:

"Renewable" should not factor into the equation.
Whale oil is a renewable resource, but Kerosene is cheaper.
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http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/12/a-verdict-on-controlled-oil-burns-and-cancer/?src=twrhp&scp=1&sq=environmental%20effects%20other&st=cse November 12, 2010, 4:29 pm
A Verdict on Controlled Oil Burns and Cancer Risk By LESLIE KAUFMAN Fumes from oil burned by spill-response teams in the Gulf of Mexico did not contain enough cancer-causing chemicals to pose a risk to human health, two new studies from the Environmental Protection Agency conclude.
A controlled burn in the vicinity of the leaking BP well in June.The reports are the latest in a series suggesting that some of the lingering effects of the BP spill and cleanup have been milder than feared.
As the slick from the Deepwater Horizon accident threatened Louisiana's delicate shoreline in the spring and summer, government regulators carried out 411 controlled burns along with other mop-up techniques, the agency said. The burns consumed 222,000 to 313,000 barrels of oil, the government estimates.
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wrote:

from surplus/substandard and damaged potatos. He had an excise permit to produce the stuff but it had to have gasoline added immediately (something like E95) That made sense, but after a few years the still was shut down and he went back to petro-power (deisel)
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wrote:

Ethanol (from corn) as a motor fuel never did, and never will, make sense - particularly in Oilberta. Ethanol from saw-grass would be a totally different situation.
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\> Thank your lucky stars.

as they figure out ways to liquefy natural gas for carrying and travel that'll probably take over a lot of things http://www.google.com/finance?cid "77660 NorthernStar Natural Gas wants to help navigate fuel to its destinations (homes and businesses) on the US West Coast. It is developing liquefied natural gas (LNG) receiving terminals which will re-gasify the fuel from suppliers for consumers using existing pipelines. By cooling and converting it to a liquid form, natural gas can be transported more easily and cheaply across long distances. Its portfolio includes one terminal project with a capacity of 1.3 billion cu. ft. per day (Bradwood Landing, in Oregon) and one offshore terminal in California. Industry veteran executives William Garrett and Paul Soanes have teamed up with investment firm MatlinPatterson Global Advisors to fund the company's development.
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