Why would someone put in a salt water swimming pool?

Page 3 of 3  

On Apr 23, 6:19 pm, "Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC"

buffalo ny: swimming pools require sanitary water. salt is not a sanitizer. you can use chlorine correctly to sanitize the water overnight with a shock [high level] dose. you could if desired destroy the leftover chlorine the next day with an oxygen shock [see your pool supply store for sodium persulfate or one of its cousins]. this would eliminate the chlorine (and its benefits) from the water. this is usually new information to many: properly maintained swimming pool chlorine levels do not have a (chloramine) smell. a (chloramine) smell reveals improperly maintained INSUFFICIENT levels of chlorine. insufficient chlorine makes chloramines that irritate the eyes. the oxygen shock is the second best shock to chlorine shock. see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swimming_pool_sanitation but also see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swimming_pool_sanitation#Salt_Chlorinators which is quoted here for your convenience but see wikipedia for constantly updated info: "Salt Chlorinators: Chlorine may be generated on site, such as in saltwater pools. A New Zealand device the Aquatech IG450 home pool saline chlorinator was introduced to the residential swimming pool industry in 1973 when the first commercially manufactured units for home use were shown at the 1973 Chicago Trade Fair. In the following years, many US, Australian and South African companies duplicated the device, as the process of creating chlorine from saline water - a natural process that occurs in nature when lightning strikes the ocean - was not Patentable. This process generates chlorine by low-voltage electrolysis of dissolved salt (NaCl) using an electrical electrode incorporated in the pool plumbing, eliminating the requirement of manually dosing the pool daily with powder chlorine. Chlorine generators avoid the need for constant handling of dangerous sanitizing chemicals, and can generate sanitizing power at a lower cost than equivalent chemicals, but they have a significant up-front cost for the apparatus and initial salting of the pool. Annual rainfall contributes to dilution of the pool water, which will require regular "topping up" with several 50Lb (20Kg) bags of salt for the average size pool. Another issue is the production of equal amounts of Sodium Chloride and Sodium Hydroxide (ph = 14, or Base) which causes the pool water pH to rise to levels that render the production of useful chlorine HOCl to levels as low as 15% while the balance of the chlorine produced converts to OCL. OCl still maintains some bacteriacidal properties, but is only effective in concentration of 25,000ppm, so in effect is useless. This dramatic swap occurs in water where the pH is exceeds 8.0. This renders the saline system less effective unless a close watch is kept on pH levels. Some saline units in production (2007) have incorporated an acid demand test, and the pH is maintainted at the correct level by periodic shots of acid into the system. The downside of these units is the need to store large quantities of Hydrochloric Acid on the pool site which must be secured for safety if young children are present. Early salt chlorinators required 2.0ppm dilution, and this content gave the pool water a slightly salty, brackish taste, but not as salty as seawater which is around 20.0ppm. Modern units use far less salinity - around 0.2ppm to 0.4ppm and the salt cannot be detected by taste. Pool water that splashes and evaporates, such as on a pool deck, leaves a salt residue. Being closer to isotonic salinity (0.9%) than fresh water, saltwater pools have an easier feel on the eyes, and a touch typically characterized as "silky", not unlike bath salts. Ionization systems using copper and silver, destroying bacteria and algae, are optional replacements for chlorine systems. In this method low amounts of chlorine are necessary to combat algae. The pool water runs through the ionization cells and is disinfected using a low electrical current. A control unit can decide how much copper and silver to release into the pool, reducing manual maintenance. The cost for such a system is higher than that of a saltwater generator, which already is much more expensive than the standard chlorine disinfection systems. This method of pool water sterilization has been banned in Australia, pending an appeal from the local manufacturers of Ion units. (2005-2006)" also:
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The salt water pool systems use a chlorine generator in the water path that extracts the chlorine from the sodium chloride electrically and it then recombines but while it is free chlorine it sanitizes the water. You still need to shock the pool but you don't add chlorine in an ongoing process. This works at about 5 PPT salt (like contact solution or blood) , the ocean is 37-38 PPT.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 23, 3:19 pm, "Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC"

You don't suppose they meant a salt-fed chlorine generating system, do you? Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Advantages -- if you have a dependable source of salt water -- One of my favorite pools was salt-water, at the Shek-O Country Club in Hong Kong. They drew and exchanged salt water from the South China Sea and IIRC didn't have to use complicated pool chemistry. Another peculiarity of that pool -- it didn't have a heater, it had a chiller to keep the pool water from getting too hot in the tropic climate -- Regards --
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.