Why would someone put in a salt water swimming pool?

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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net writes:

Try again but fill your lungs with air.
If I exhale completely I sink to the bottom of the pool. With my lungs mostly full I float fine. For years I thought I had to keep swimming to stay afloat.
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says...

Likewise, I can sit on the bottom of the pool and wave to the irritated swim instructor floating up above insisting that all people float.
--
snipped-for-privacy@phred.org is Joshua Putnam
<http://www.phred.org/~josh/
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Chuckle. BTDT. I don't float worth a damn, either. Even in the wide-arm, wide leg, staring at sky position, I have to keep half-full lungs, and keep kicking slightly.
aem sends....
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wrote:

If it happened on the Dead Sea or Lake Asal, they'd probably be alive today.

A lot higher if the concetrations are high enough.
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Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC writes:

For swimming pools, you mean? Advantages are convenience (not hauling chlorine) and stable quality (automatic dosing). Cost is about a wash, when you consider the true costs of investment, depreciation and electric power. Disadvantages are a complex gadget with risk of non- performance or failure, stray electric currents in pool if unit not installed properly or pool is improperly bonded/grounded, electrolytic damage to stainless steel lights/ladders/etc, corrosion of other hardware above the water (bolts on a diving board or slide, etc), ruining concrete/grout/stone with salt damage especially in a freezing climate.

Chlorine does not irritate eyes in pool concentrations. Low pH or chloramine are way, way more irritating. Eye complaints are almost always due to pH, not chlorine, sometimes other contaminants.
Chlorine also does not turn hair green.
Do not be a sucker for superstitions about chlorine. These ideas are promoted by (1) people trying to sell you non-chlorine products and (2) neurotics who find some invisible cause for every discomfort in life.
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Another piece of nonsense from the world's foremost usenet contrarian, Richard Kinch.
Chlorine can cause hair to turn green. That's because many, many people have artificially colored hair. Chlorine can absolutely turn your hair green.
Kinch is a nut job, who doesn't know how to think things through.
CWM
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Awww, cut him some slack, willya? He's not from around here. Chemistry works a little different on his home planet, that's all. Where he comes from, gasoline is safe to drink and carbon monoxide is safe to breathe, but common household borax is a deadly poison. And all petroleum distillates are the same. Electricity works differently on his homeworld, too, where there's no difference between a parallel circuit and a dead short. He just hasn't had enough time to get adjusted to the differences between his home planet and this one. Give him a break.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Ah, now comes Miller, my Usenet stalker, pouting about my trenchant myth- busting. Persisting in a futile obfuscation of snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com like an aborigine frightened by his own photograph.
My worthless scribbles are somehow worthy of his meticulous inventory, and he takes it as his duty to hork up and spit his top-ten bile-wads into yet another redundant post now and then.
If one can't inform, then one ought to at least entertain. Or keep quiet. Republishing old quarrels is boring. Excitement over such things is an unhealthy sign.
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Reading the silly stuff you post *is* entertaining, Richard...

It's quite understandable that you don't like being reminded of what you've written in the past -- but it's hardly boring.

Who's excited? I just wanted to share the laughs.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Miller writes:

De gustibus non disputandum.
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Your Latin would be even more impressive if it were correct.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller writes:

Oooo, how much more?
http://www.google.com/search?q=%22De+gustibus+non+disputandum%22
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Doug Miller writes:

That, I would dispute.
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OK, fine, you *won't* discover your error.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Charlie Morgan writes:

Sez you.
I've seen plenty of blonde kids (no "artificially colored hair") with green hair from a SWIMMING POOL or SPA, but not from CHLORINE. I have observed this in pools or spas I know to have copper added, with various concentrations of chlorine down to ZERO. Morever, I have observed those same kids in pools I know to have *no* copper but lots of chlorine, and never found any trace of green.
I defy you to produce a chemical reaction of hair protein plus chlorine equals anything green.
When hair turns green from a swimming pool, it is because of a COPPER compound likely added as an algaecide, most commonly copper sulfate. Not chlorine. Typically concentrated in the tips of hair by gravity during drying, the concentration being too slight to otherwise produce a visible effect.
You also see this effect in fingernails. You won't typically see it in dark hair.

No, you're given to foolish statements like that.
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On Mon, 23 Apr 2007 18:57:14 -0500, Richard J Kinch wrote:

You realize that there are not many black dies? Most that are black are really really dark green or blue? Which when bleached turns light green or light blue?
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dnoyeB writes:

That's a bit of definitional retreat, from hair itself to hair dyes.
Nevertheless, of the variety of cases I've seen, it has nothing to do with dyed hair, and everything to do with fair-haired kids, or older specimens salon-bleaching their hair artificially blonde. Something in the pool water is added to their fair hair, not taken away, to produce the green, that something being copper. Tip concentration exaggerates the effect.
The few ppm of chlorine as in swimming pools does not bleach. It it were, normal bathing in city water (which used to be sanitized with a ppm or two of free chlorine, but nowadays almost all chloramine instead) would have been bleaching everybody's hair dyes, and that certainly wasn't the case.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

Google [Chlorine+green+hair] = 568,000 hits.
Something's going on.
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HeyBub writes:

Yes. Maybe if you read some of those hits you'd know what it is, such as this one in the top 10:
"Chlorine Blamed for Turning Hair Green" http://www.southshoregunitepools.com/resources/pdfs/green_hair.pdf
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someone they knew put

a pond of fish.

in pools. Is their a

irratate their kids eyes?

Salt's not going to kill harmful microrganisms unless maybe if you get up to the concentration of salt in the Dead Sea. I believe the ocean and blood contain ~5% salt and we all know stuff can live there. Chloride ion has no oxidative power to kill bugs.
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