Why there will be no XL pipeline: Warren Buffett

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Thanks for the clarification. How about other issues, like track radiuses needed to support high speed? Or just the number of tracks. Like if you tried to run a train at 200mph, would it work without it's own, seperate tracks? I'm thinking you still have local trains going 50mph, using those same tracks. It's not just Boston, NYC, DC. I'm suspecting that may be a big part of the problem with Acela, no? That you can't keep a wide open track in front of it? And then if you need to widen the radius, install new track that's not within the current right-of-way, etc, it would get very costly, very quickly.
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On Mar 10, 3:59 pm, "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" <atlas-

What the hell does nuclear power have to do with trains? You could take all the sunsidies to nuclear power and it would be a drop in the bucket in creating a high speed rail service in the northeast or connecting the midwest cities. It's not just "fixing" tracks. There are HUGE problems. For example, does a high speed 250mph train go across grade crossings ANYWHERE in the world, let alone in a section of the country, like the northeast where they occur multiple times in a mile? Any go around turns with radiuses designed for 100mph? What's the value of the homes, business, roads, highways, streets, that are in the way of expanding those turn radiuses?

Yes, that's an advantage IF your final destination happens to be the city itself. Between London and Paris, it's an advantage IF your final destination is within the city itself. But it has little relevance to linking up the midwest USA as harry is advocating. And if you apply it to say Boston to DC, the cost of getting that 250mph train that could compete with an airplane, would make the ticket so expensive it would be the next Concorde. At 100mph, the ticket is already the price of an airline ticket.
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wrote:

Tunnels. And they don't travel at high speeds all the time.

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On Sun, 10 Mar 2013 10:38:09 -0700 (PDT), harry

Maybe the same reason France and Israel wanted their first nuke plants, bombs.
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On Mar 11, 12:34 am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Tch. They are buying the plant in, not suitable for nuke material.
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My understanding, though, is that the dilution things can be pulled out at the other and used. So, in that case, you get a two-fer.

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Not to mention it seems rather odd that the Keystone folks, who's business it is to build the pipeline, who's money is on the line, would be building it if it's not competitive with the railroad for moving oil.
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On 3/11/2013 2:31 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The Keystone folks get the sweet, sweet corporate welfare aka taxpayer subsidies. That's how it's competitive. That, and their ability to use eminent domain against property owners trying to hold out for more money.
That's another railroad win - no need to force property owners off their land, since the railroad is already in place.
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Having already used imminent domain to force people off their land 100 or so years ago.
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ALL your land is stolen from the indians.
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On Tue, 12 Mar 2013 00:59:43 -0700 (PDT), harry

... by Englishmen.
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On 03/12/2013 12:59 AM, harry wrote:

...who stole it from other Indians who stole it from somebody else.
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Oh, what sort of excuse is that? Give some details or did you just make that up?
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What's he going to do with one of them? Colo(u)r in it?
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Why would they do that? Look what happened to harry after he was exposed to Brit women!

They had no intention of living there.
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wrote:

I understand this is going to be a buried pipeline and there is no reason why the farmers can't grow corn over that pipe once it is in the ground.
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On 3/11/13 4:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: ir land, since the railroad is already in place.

in days past due to conservation tillage practices farmers use now.
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On Tue, 12 Mar 2013 05:50:12 -0500, Dean Hoffman

Why would soil erosion be any worse after they bury the pipe than before? Most of that area is pool table flat anyway, There is no place for the soil to go unless the wind takes it.
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On 3/12/13 9:55 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Water runs downhill even here. :-) I don't think erosion would be any worse after the installation than before. We have several pipelines nearby. I think one farmer told me the pipeline company reburied some on his farm. Erosion might be worse immediately after the pipe is buried if the pipeline crews don't tamp the soil. It would stabilize over time, I think. There is a lot of pipe buried for irrigation. It's normally about 8" diameter and buried 5' deep. That isn't normally tamped. I can't say I've noticed or heard of extra erosion in those spots. I go for years at a time without going to a particular field though and looking at the field layout isn't on my mind. We have had some underground wire hit by farm equipment after several year's erosion. That was signal wire that was buried about 30" deep. It doesn't happen often but the possibility is still there. Farmers don't generally work the soil more than about six inches deep in this area.
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Reference for that claim, please......

Yawn.... That has been used as much by the railroad folks more than for any pipeline ever built, so it's a moot point.

There is no need, for the most part, to force anyone off their land because of the Keystone pipeline. They need an easement to put the pipe underground. For that, owners get a tidy sum. I saw a rancher on TV last month very happy with the amount he got. They put the pipeline through his pasture, pay him a lot of money and after it's done he doesn't even know it's there. Now the railroad, they do force folks off their property, at least more so then a pipeline. Cows can still graze on land above a pipeline. With railroad tracks, not so much........
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