Why not put an electrical copper wire into the weed whacker?

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Besides the 48 in. per hr. of cutting string, u you also have to calculate your time that it takes to change that string. RIDICULES!!!I went and asked at my sears store if there was a replacement "tap & go" head for this aggravating thing. From the Sears salesperson (and a consensuses of store employees) "I don't know". I was told to check with local lawn mower shop to see if they had some different heads that I might try. So much for Sear's knowledgeable personnel. Just happened to have an old head in my shop from a previous weedeater which I owned, tried it and it fit perfectly (lucky)I don't remember what it came off of and didn't have any name brand on it, so I hope that I don't have to replace it. The head was a large capacity head that will hold up to 0.105 line size, which is plenty big enough and besides none of it is wasted. I now have nothing against the Weedwacker. Plenty of power (33cc), starts every time and with the head fully loaded, I can cut until it runs out of gas. (The way it should be!!!)
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GHenry wrote:

I suppose you could use thin, stranded (flexible) wire. Something like 1/16 - 1/8 7x19 stainless. End would tend to unwind though...maybe a nico press on it?
--

dadiOH
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I used aircraft cable and it worked fine and lasted much longer than monofilament. It's one of those times, though, when you wear long pants and wear safety goggles.
Nonny
--
On most days,
it's just not worth
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re: "My (steel) jigsaw blades last longer than 5 minutes."
Start your jigsaw and ram it full speed into the material you want to cut; include a rock or chain link fence in the mix.
Let us know how long it lasts.
re: "My (steel) drill bits last longer than 5 minutes."
Start your drill and ram it full speed into the material you want to cut; include a rock or chain link fence in the mix.
Let us know how long it lasts.
re: "My (steel) cultivator & edger blades last longer than 5 minutes."
I'll assume you aren't cultivating or edging rocks or chain link fences. If you are, let us know how long they last.
re: "Something (dunno what yet) is DIFFERENT about string trimmers. "
I'm guessing it's the force they undergo when be rammed full speed into the material you want to cut, including rocks or chain link fences.
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I got a great idea. Because you don't want to take the advise of other, wiser individuals why don't you just do what your bright mind tells you to do. Go ahead and use a wire and let us know how it works. One caution though, make sure nobody is anywhere in sight when you fire that trimmer up the shit his the fan.
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On Tue, 06 Jul 2010 09:52:55 -0500, Gordon Shumway wrote:

Hi Gordon,
Who said I'm not taking the advice? I'm only asking the question.
About the only advice I won't take is yours (which would be idiocy to just fire it up and see what happens).
I have no intention of doing anything any more dangerous than what we all do every day with the rest of our power tools.
I'm trying to find out if stronger material exist, and, apparently, as people have posited, they DO exist.
We're just exploring the possibilities (it seems like it's YOU who is jumping to conclusions without thinking ahead, not us).
But I do thank you for your advise (sic).
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Go ahead and try the wire. Ask again when the wire breaks off and harpoons you in the ankle.
Trimmer string won't hurt you when it comes flying off the trimmer head. Either it comes off in small harmless chunks, or it curls up into a wad.
Circular saws, lawn mowers, etc. all have SHIELDS to protect you from the blade if it should break or come apart. Jigsaws and drill bits break when they're embedded in the material they're trying to cut, and the material keeps the broken pieces from turning into shrapnel.
String trimmers don't have that kind of shielding. You couldn't get close to whatever you were trimming around if they were properly shielded.
Wires, saw blades, and chains will also cause damage to the things you're trying to mow around. They will take chunks out of cinder blocks. They will peel the bark off trees. They will gouge posts.
Fat lot of good trimming around the tree does you if you girth the tree with the trimmer and cause it to die.
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There are solid blade wheels available for many trimmers. I've never used one myself so I can't say how way they work.
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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When I was doing my own yard trimming, the string trimmer I had came with a replacement lower end that held a flat bar of about1/8" or 3/16" steel an inch or so wide and about 12" long. It was used to edge alongside a walk or driveway, cutting a groove in the soil like a traditional edger. It would have been terrible as a line trimmer, but sure did a good job along the driveway and sidewalk. You could also remove the knife-like blade and replace it with a heavy duty circular saw-type blade to cut brush. The trimmer came with a harness you wore in the situation that prevented the long tube and blade from coming close to operator body parts.
For trimming around stone walls, foundations and decorative rocks, however, my replacement "line" of aircraft cable did the trick.
Nonny
--
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its just not worth
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GHenry wrote:

Vibration and flexing make copper brittle. I imagine a flying piece of wire could endanger the eyesight of passersby some distance away.
Twenty years ago I used to see ads for weed whacker heads using flailing chain-saw chain. None for me, thanks.
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J Burns wrote:

I use the "titanium" string made by Husqvarna. It holds up better than anything else I've used. Also when cutting it's the the far end of the string that does the cutting not the middle. The more you make the "end" cut the longer the string will last.
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On Tue, 06 Jul 2010 06:16:06 -0500, FatterDumber& Happier Moe wrote:

I don't understand what you mean here but I will google to see if there is a good explanation on the web of what you intimate.
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GHenry wrote:

There are a lot of heads like this: > http://tinyurl.com/2bcpcux Some look a lot like a skillsaw blade. I've never tried them so can't say how well they work.
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Dean Hoffman wrote:

I've used that style. It works well but eventually the "blades" get worn down and have to be replaced. No big deal and not expensive (a set of 12 is about $5).
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GHenry wrote:

Copper wire wouldn't last but you can replace the string head with one that uses flails, either chain or metal (or plastic) blades. http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/NTESearch?storeIdi70&N=0&Ntk=All&Ntt=flail+head&Nty=1&D=flail+head&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&Dx=mode+matchallpartial
The chain flails don't cut neatly but are effective. I used one for some time to whack down 6-8' tall dog fennel, worked OK. Ultimately, I added a couple of wide 6" saber saw blades to the ends of the chains, worked even better.
--

dadiOH
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I have one of those chain ones and it got a "recall". They supplied plastic replacement blades free to anyone that asked. Seems the chains were wearing out the pin that held them in. You can get triangular solid metal blades for rough work.
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GHenry wrote:

Just make a metal blade for it. Cut out a piece of lawnmower blade and sharpen it on a grinder. Bolt it on.
--
LSMFT

I haven't spoken to my wife in 18 months.
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On 7/6/2010 2:16 AM, GHenry wrote:

If you want to chew up the countryside why toy with a piece of copper wire man. Get yourself one of these . That's a solid steel blade in there. If you really want to make a mess of things you could replace the normal blade with a 10" carbide tipped saw blade. Danger? Men like you laugh at danger.
http://www.stihl.ca/ViewProduct.aspx?ProductID &x=FYHv+XF4mF7doeX4mc2vDQ
LdB
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***** DARWIN AWARD *****
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