Why is there a Title for a Trailer House?

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A local Trailer Park is being shut down. The city wants to develop that land, although I heard it's more because there are too many problems with the tenants. Whatever the reason, they are going to demolish the trailers, but will give them away for free to save the cost of demolition. I got to thinking that my garage has so much stuff in it, that I cant use it as a garage anymore. A trailer would be a solution, and for only the cost to have it moved about 10 miles, that seems like a cheap storage solution.
I contacted the person in charge and was told to just go look at them, as most are unlocked and open. I went and looked at them, and found that many of them are in very bad shape. In fact in one of them my foot nearly went thru the floor, and others have leaking roofs and mold inside. Sfter seeing those, I was about ready to just forget the whole idea. But there were a few of them locked, and I was told that the guy would be there at 3pm. I waited and the first one he unlocked was really nice inside, and the outside is good also. It even has a semi-attached garage which is also quite nice, and is included, as long as I dismantle it, or find a way to move it.
I told the guy that I'd take that one. I found a guy who will move it for a fair price and was ready to begin removing the skirting and figuring out what to do with that garage. That's when the guy in charge told me that he had bad news. He said there is no title for that trailer.
First off, I never knew that house trailers even have titles, and now I'm wondering why???? It's not like they are driven down the road on a regular basis.
I live on a farm, and I dont plan to move it once it's here. It will remain here permanently. If I sell the farm, it will stay. So why do I need a title? If I build a house, small cabin, or shed, that dont have a title. In fact some years ago, I did build a cabin for guests when they visit, and when the weather is very hot, I often sleep in there because it's small, and thus it cools better for much less power use than in my house.
I asked a local guy who used to work for a real estate company, and he said that since it will be used for storage that I probably dont need the title, but if I was to live in it, it would need a title. I asked him why, and told him what I said above (if I build a house, small cabin, or shed, that dont have a title.). He said that he really does not know why, and explained that he only assisted realtors, by mostly doing repairs for them, and went on to say he did not take any training, and dont know the legal aspects.
So, that leaves me puzzled..... Why is a title needed?
Note: From the looks of things, the person in charge has said that he will give me the key, and "look the other way" if I want it, as long as it's not kept inside the city limits. So I guess I can have it without a title, since it's going on a farm quite a distance from the city. He also told me that I CAN NOT live in it without a title, but for storage it should not matter. (which makes no sense at all). But that still dont explain the need for a title???????
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Go to your state's DMV website and look up the requirements for what types of trailers require a title.
A title is used to prove ownership. If there is a lien (e.g. a mortgage) against the trailer, the title will show that. If you take possession without a clear title, there's a (slim) chance that a bank or other lien holder could repossess the trailer if there is an outstanding loan on it.
Instead of talking to a guy that does repairs for a real estate company, why don't you call an actual real estate agent for an explanation?
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On Thu, 03 Oct 2013 05:39:23 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@farm.com wrote in

It's my understanding that state laws *define* a mobile home as a vehicle. They then do the title stuff so they can 1) tax it, 2) provide a central location to keep records (liens) about it, and most importantly 3) control it.
Check with the DMV as to what records they have for it. Just because the city doesn't have the title paper, doesn't mean that a record doesn't exist. Also, you can probably get a replacement title paper from the DMV if you can prove that you own it.
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wrote:

It's all of those and more. It *is* a trailer, so is mobile. It then falls under the motor vehicle codes. In some states, it's a motor vehicle unless you remove the hitch and axle(s), in which case it becomes real property, and taxed as such.

It may be too old to have a title. Titling trailers my be a relatively recent thing in the state (boats and motorcycles are similar).
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wrote:

I wonder what would happen if I was to build a cabin with wheels under it? I'm not planning to do this, but that would be a "portable cabin", meaning it could be moved. I wonder how that would qualify, regarding a title?
I have seen this done. Some guy bought some land to hunt on, and did not want to build a permanent structure. He build a rather nice cabin on the frame which I believe came from a semi-truck trailer. He had a hitch on the front, and stored it on his land, but he would also haul it and use when he went camping. It's my opinion that this would qualify as a RV camper, even though it was home built. I spoke with the guy when he was at a campsite and got to see the interior of it. He built a really nice cabin, and I was impressed. But I never bothered to ask about title or licensing at that time.
I have also seen people get a trailer home, and build it into a house. In fact I visited some people once who had what looked like a regular house from the outside, but when you got inside there was a trailer inside of it. They said that they originally lived in just the trailer and kept building around it until it became a house. It still had many of the trailer rooms inside such as the original bathroom, but the trailer was completely enclosed inside the house, including a roof over the entire building, with the original trailer roof now inside the attic.
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On Friday, October 4, 2013 4:31:25 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@farm.com wrote:

If the "trailer" never left your property, then you wouldn't have to do any thing.
If you were planning on LEGALLY moving it down public highways, even just o nce, you would need to have it licensed and titled as a "home built" traile r in many states.

Either he got it titled and licensed, or he's towing it illegally. That's t he long and short of it.
Paranoid whack-jobs will claim that the cops have nothing better to do than hassle innocent people for no reason, but the truth is they do. You've got to be misbehaving something awful on the road to get pulled over.
Just cruising down the road straight and level with what appears to be a le gally-licensed trailer from 500' away, they will not bother you. All they c are is the trailer is not whipping around behind you, nothing is falling of f, and the license plate has the correct color sticker on it.
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First, check your state from the list on this site. http://drivinglaws.aaa.com/laws/titles-for-mobile-homes/
snipped-for-privacy@farm.com wrote:

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Duh. So the govt can track and tax the owner and real estate industry can make money off all parties involved with xferring the title.
nb
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So it has nothing to do with proving ownership so that when I buy a house/car/trailer a lien holder can't take it away from me even though I was never associated with or responsible for the lien?
Who knew!
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were). It's personal property and treated just like a car or boat. Tax? Sure in some jurisdictions there is a personal property tax but not most and certainly not everywhere trailers are titled.
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On Thu, 03 Oct 2013 05:39:23 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@farm.com wrote:

If you are putting it somewhere that the county.state does not know about, you don't need the title in any practical sense.
It basically comes down to the different classes of "house trailers". There are RVs (which might actually look like a mobile homes but lack HUD approvals). There are Mobile homes that can be towed, you can take the wheels off and permanently install them (have HUD approval) There are manufactured homes that may be one or more manufactured modules that are always permanently installed. Each state deals with them differently. Some like Florida, consider the first two a motor vehicle and you may even need to buy a tag every year for it. The last is seen as a building.
It is really all about the taxes and how they collect them.
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I talked with some friends that were in the housing business. They were putting together a modular home. They went to a factory and down one side were double wide mobile homes and the other side were modular homes. The only differance you could really see was the mobile homes have a title and modular ones don't . Behind my dads house was a single wide trailer . It was old and could not be replaced by another trailer by the county trailer zoning rules. The move in somethng that looked just like a single wide trailer, but it did not have a title and was called a modular home.
Seems that calling a trailer al modular home by the ones that make it gets around the zoning rules.
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On Thu, 3 Oct 2013 11:10:10 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

That all gets back to that HUD approval.
If it is HUD approved, it can be called a home, not a trailer/RV.
In Florida it is virtually impossible to install a mobile home these days. None I have ever heard of meet the new wind code (although they may be making one) If you are grandfathered in, you can keep it but it can't be moved or replaced.
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On Thu, 03 Oct 2013 11:55:41 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Nope. HUD approval is only for HUD approved loans (or mortgages that may be packaged and sold to HUD). Many homes aren't HUD approved but are real estate. In many places a mobile home (trailer) that has its hitch cut off ant axles removed becomes real estate.

Everywhere in Florida? That's dumb.
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On Thu, 03 Oct 2013 20:13:22 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

It also refers to what is sold in interstate commerce.

It would vary by wind code zone
I suppose if you can find a 115 MPH rated trailer you could put it up on the central Georgia line somewhere but most Florida residents live in a 130 MPH or greater area.,
http://gfretwell.com/electrical/2012%20wind%20code%20map.jpg
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At the risk of repeating myself, a title is not just "all about the taxes".
From my state's DMV website:
"...a title certificate proves ownership of a car, truck, motorcycle, motorboat or manufactured home. The title is used to transfer it to another owner."
Since it is often the case that it's the owner that is responsible for the taxes, in that regard the title could be said to be "about the taxes". However, it's also very much (even more so) about who actually owns the property and who has the right to transfer it to another party.
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On Thu, 3 Oct 2013 15:36:28 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

All "tags" are about the taxes. There are plenty of things that move around in commerce that are worth more than a 1974 Gremlin but you still need tags and a title for that Gremlin.
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Read what you wrote.
Earlier you said titles were all about axes, now you say "all tags" about taxes.
At first I assumed you were grouping tags and titles together, but then you finished with "you need tags and a title for that Gremlin." That means you consider them 2 different things - which they are.
Titles establish ownership. Taxes may or not be the responsibility of the owner but the title isn't directly about taxes, it's about ownership.
At the www.dmv.org, if you look at the title transfer page for various states, you'll read things such as...
"A title is a legal document that signifies ownership in a piece of property" (ND) "A title, or pink slip, proves that you own your vehicle" (NY) "A title is proof of legal ownership of a vehicle" (AK) "The document referred to as a title is what designates one individual (or more) as the legal owner of a vehicle" (TX)
Once again, a title establishes ownership. How taxes are associated with the title holder is established by the tax code for that taxing jurisdiction, but that is not the same as saying that the title "is all about the taxes".
The title is all about ownership.
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Yep.
And the OP should realize since there is no title, there is a good probability that he's taking possession of stolen property with the risks that entails.
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wrote:

is extremely slim - and if the "seller" gives a "bill of sale" saying he has given posession to the OP, the OP can apply for clear title from the courts or DMV
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