Why is raw honey from Costco twice as expensive as Filtered ?

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On Fri, 01 Jan 2016 14:57:38 -0800, Uncle Monster wrote:

These bees are "American bees". Says so right on the label!
https://i.imgur.com/dZ6B5vm.gif
They are in the California Union, apparently, since the honey is "source from California" according to the label.
However, they fly the honey to Texas for packing, so, maybe the bees get tired going from California to Texas!
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On 01/01/2016 04:58 PM, Paul M. Cook wrote:

No, they just ship the whole hives by flatbed truck. And when you wreck one of those, doesn't everybody have fun:
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-utah-bees-idUSTRE79N6WN20111024
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rbowman wrote:

The whole story of how that particular Costco-only honey is made is here http://naturenates.com/raw-unfiltered-honey/
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rbowman wrote:

Those bees were being shipped to somewhere for pollination , not to harvest the honey . Many smaller operations will sell their honey in bulk to a packager for resale . Less profit , but also less invested in packaging and filtering equipment .
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On 01/01/2016 07:44 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

I always wondered about the honey part of the equation. There was a company in Polson MT that made bee wood, and I took a load to several places in South Dakota and that when I first learned about how many miles a bee colony might travel as they were shipped around for pollination. The almond ranchers are just interested in getting their groves pollinated but I assume the bee are doing their bee thing all the time, making honey and little bees.
We used to have cattle rustlers -- now it's bee rustlers:
http://missoulanews.bigskypress.com/missoula/honeybees/Content?oid $57621
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On 1/1/2016 1:54 PM, Paul M. Cook wrote:

I suspect it has nothing to do with the processing cost which is probably miniscule.
If it is a low volume item requiring special labeling and packaging line, and additional testing for safety that may be why it is more expensive.
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Frank" <"frank wrote:

I think it's a yuppy thing ... they charge more because people will pay more believing it's a superior product - which in a way it is . Kinda like the "organic vegetables" thing , the difference in production cost is more than balanced by the exorbitant prices charged for anything labeled "organic" . There is no such "official" designation for honey - how are you going to prove your bees foraged only on "organic" plants ? Probably why raw local honey is a pretty big business in some areas , around here it sells well during the tourist season - especially if a chunk of comb is included . We have the advantage here of zero "commercial" farming with it's attendant spraying of questionable (IMO) chemicals .
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On 1/2/2016 8:32 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

Helping wife recover from knee replacement surgery I've been doing all the food shopping and learning a lot.
For example she had been buying low fat mayonnaise and it is much more expensive than the normal stuff. Same for similar products that are said to be more healthy for you but cost a lot more.
Some of the labeling is absolutely ridiculous. You see things like bottled water with 0 calories or gluten free butter.
This old, retired chemist can read and understand labels but that does not say much about the general public.
I worked a couple of years in food packaging R&D and know that some of the packages, e.g. water and soda, cost more than the contents.
While at it, might mention, that many years ago I worked a summer in a control lab whose plant made sorbitol and mannitol and learned a lot about sugar chemistry.
Sucrose, high fructose corn syrup, and honey are basically the same sugar mixture. The sucrose of course is a disaccharide but breaks down to glucose and fructose at the same concentration as in honey and high fructose corn syrup.
Add a little food coloring and floral essences to high fructose corn syrup and you could most likely make artificial honey that users could not distinguish from the real thing.
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Frank" <"frank wrote:

The chinese know that and used it to adulterate real honey at a great saving in production costs . Not to mention the other problems associated with producing honey in a very polluted environment .
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On 01/02/2016 09:14 AM, Frank wrote:

And what's up with organic sugar?
If someone is concerned about their health, they wouldn't be eating sugar.
And if the don't care about their health, they might as well eat the cheap high-fructose corn syrup crap.
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On 1/2/2016 10:18 AM, Euell Gibbons wrote:

Sea salt is also another one. Salt from sea water versus salt mine. Both are still sodium chloride.
Reminds me of a time I was working on a food packaging problem with a Campbell Soup lab. One day they brought in pallets of soup and opened the cases and punctured the cans with an ice pick. They said they were headed for the dump. Somebody forgot to add salt to the batch. I have to laugh as that was 25 years ago and now they'd probably sell it as a premium low salt product.
Friend said as a kid, he worked in one of their factories and said he had the hardest job because he was a salter and had to haul big bags around.
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On 1/2/2016 1:22 PM, Frank wrote:

As son of depression babies, that really is tragic. Throwing food away? Ought be taken out and shot, I say!
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On 1/2/2016 1:22 PM, Frank wrote:

Campbells soup flavored salt?
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On 01/02/2016 12:22 PM, Frank wrote:
...

Mostly, yes, excepting sea salt also contains a few percent of Ca++, K+ and Mg++ salts as well whereas prepared table salt is essentially all Na+. Most prepared table salt also has iodide added..
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dpb wrote:

Also sea salt has many organic matters. Mine salt is just pure salt.
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A few years ago, there was a spike in the price of pure honey. KFC switched to dispensing packets of "honey sauce" for their biscuts. Basicly corn syrup with food coloring.
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On 01/02/2016 08:39 AM, Arthur Conan Doyle wrote:

I forget the weasel word, but there's also the maple syrup that's made by dropping a maple leaf into a drum of corn syrup. When I was a kid having a bottle of Karo syrup on the table was the hallmark of a low rent, white trash existence.
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Arthur Conan Doyle wrote:

Corn syrup is so called double molecule sugar. Major contributor for obesity. Real sugar is single molecule sugar.
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On 1/2/2016 6:53 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

https://cdavies.wordpress.com/2009/01/27/simple-sugars-fructose-glucose-and-sucrose/
Sucrose, "table sugar" is a double ring.
Fructose / glucose is single ring.
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On 1/2/2016 8:14 AM, Frank wrote:

I've had a question and wasn't sure who to ask, and haven't been able to find the information doing a web search either.
Since, you're a chemist, maybe you know the answer.
I use liquid soap to bathe in, and it makes a lot of foam and bubbles that float in the tub as I'm bathing that will simply go down the drain as foam and bubbles. IF I add some baby oil during or after I've used the the foaming liquid bath soap, the oil breaks down the foam and bubbles completely, so much so, that if I add baby oil to the bath soap and try to wash with both at the same time, the soap will not foam up at all.
I always thought soap breaks down oil products, but this seems to work the other way around, the oil is breaking down the soap product.
What's actually happening chemically that makes the oil break down the soap foam?
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Maggie

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