Why Insulation in Inside Wall?

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dpb wrote:

How far does the snake go? It may be hitting the blocking that is required by some building codes about halfway up the wall.
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About 5-6 feet.
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The reason I'm trying from the bottom is because the hole at the bottom (near the floor) is concealed by the entertainment center, and if I can't get the wire through the wall I didn't want to cut a hole where it will be very visible.
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Make sure you are using a skinny 1/4" snake with no hook on it at first to try and push your way up. A fat thick snake is not going to help. If you are hitting something like blocking, then your SOL. Could you try another stud bay by moving left or right of where you are working?
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jim evans wrote:

What about the other suggestion of using smaller diameter/stiffer object to probe? What was result of that experiment. If, as Mike says, you're hitting blocking, your choice is give up or cut an access hole to drill through it.
You're not going to fight both the insulation and gravity going upwards w/ anything that isn't rigid enough to poke through.
Is it just fiberglass batts or something more dense? If the former and you're willing to sacrifice a large hole where it will eventually be hidden, a piece of ply a couple inches wide or so and long could possibly be used to make a channel against the wall by compressing the insulation. Similar idea could be tried w/ piece of (say) flex copper tubing...where's there's a will there's a way.
Still it'll be far easier from the top going down unless there's blocking in the way, of course as noted...
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I haven't come up with anything like that to try yet. A clothes hanger just bends and isn't long enough anyway. The fish tape at the nearby hardware is $45 and I'd rather not spring for that much for this one-time job.

The studfinder shows no blocking.

Faced fiberglass bats
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It should not cost that much. A 25 foot fishtape at Lowes is like $15.
A clothes hanger will not work. Even if it was long enough, its not flat and rigid to poke through the insulation. It sounds like somebody really stuffed insulation in that wall.
Just curious, is the electrical outlet already on the wall behind the TV? If its an an old work box, you can take out and possibly use that as an access point to snake the wires up the wall.
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jim evans wrote:

If it's normal kraft faced batts, you should be able to push your snake up between the insulation's kraft paper face and the back face of the drywall. I don't know how big a hole you have down there now, you may need a hole big enough to get a few fingers in in order to feel and find the space between the paper and drywall. If the kraft paper is on the other face (this was an interior wall, right?) a hole the size of a single gang electrical box should let you get your hand in to get the snake over to that side. As for other wire to fish with, go to Depot / Lowe's and get a couple of the long steel hanger wires used for suspended ceilings.
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I agree with another poster, use your plumbers snake and go from top to bottom. I see no reason why it wouldn't work.
You said you didn't want a hole in the wall if it doesn't work, well wouldn't the TV cover it? Plus, if you cut out a nice square piece of drywall it's very easy to very easy to repair the hole with the piece that you cut out.
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Hard to tell in your picture, but can you break down exactly what cables you are running and for what device? It looks like I see an f-fitting, an HDMI (?) and component cables, the other cables not sure about.
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On Wed, 08 Oct 2008 17:29:56 -0500, jim evans

up between the insulation and the drywall.
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Why remove the insulation?
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jim evans wrote:

Just use wire conduit on the outside of the wall. They have that fancy designer conduit.
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On Wed, 08 Oct 2008 17:16:07 -0500, jim evans

Most likely it is for noise reduction.
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jim evans wrote:

Because it would look silly stapled to the outside?
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jim evans wrote:

Sound, some, but also to keep the bathroom warm and cozy while you are drying off, and to reduce the condensation you would otherwise get on cool walls while the exhaust fan plays catch-up. Just like kids steaming up car windows on a crisp fall evening, when you take a hot shower on a cool morning, you can have condensation running down the walls. (a big promoter of mold...)
Like the others said, no need to remove the insulation, just feed the wires, or maybe a smurf tube, through there with a snake.
-- aem sends...
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This is what you need, but for $125 for what's likely a one-use project it's too expensive. But for those of us who run wires in walls at work, it's great!
The roller is a magnet, and you attach some metal thing to a beaded chain & drop it in the hole, pulling it down with the magnet rolling along the outside of the wall.
http://www.specialized.net/ecommerce/shop/layout.asp?product%5Fid 9X100&Magnepull-Cable-Pulling-Tool-Magnepull
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http://www.specialized.net/ecommerce/shop/layout.asp?product%5Fid 9X100&Magnepull-Cable-Pulling-Tool-Magnepull
whoops, just the opposite. The magnet is inside the wall, the roller thing is normal steel.
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As mentioned repeatedly, noise reduction.
Can't remember the source so I don't know how effective but I read/heard something a couple of decades ago that like where you have a drain pipe coming through an interior wall from upper floor, putting empty egg cartons all around it before closing kills the noise. The material + the shape of the egg slots was they key.
Insulation probably works just as well and probably better.
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Thats an old wive's tale. Egg cartons have absolutely no acoustic reduction properties, and are a fire hazard. Iron down stacks are still the best way to stop drain noise, or double sheething the wall. Mass stops sound.
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