why high current ac plugs harder to remove?

Is it just my imagination or is it a little harder to pull an AC plug that has been carrying high-current (10 A or above)out of its socket than a low current (1 A or so) plug? If so, anyone know why?
TIA
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On Monday, January 4, 2016 at 8:02:04 AM UTC-6, KenK wrote:

All things being the same (receptacle/same type plug)..."your imagination"!
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Do you mean the plug was easier to remove before the current went through it?
Or do you just mean the big plugs capable of high current are harder to remove?
Sort of related: I've found that no one sells the female end of extension cords that have 3 outlets and go on simple lamp wire. Now everything is heavy-duty, and the only one meant for lampcord has only one outlet. Are light-weight extension cords a violation of code or FTC rules or something?
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wrote:

Yes

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On 01/04/2016 11:41 AM, KenK wrote:

The higher current may have heated the contacts a bit and expanded them?
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On Monday, January 4, 2016 at 8:02:04 AM UTC-6, KenK wrote:

The heavier duty plugs have a u-shaped ground prong that is harder to pull out than plugs with round ground prongs.
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On Monday, January 4, 2016 at 8:02:04 AM UTC-6, KenK wrote:

Heavier-duty outlets tend to be manufactured with thicker copper that is "stiffer" than the thinner copper used in Walmart type outlets.
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On Mon, 4 Jan 2016 19:20:38 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Generally brass, actually
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On Mon, 04 Jan 2016 23:13:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

YES. I have never seen copper contacts! They are always brass.
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If you run too much power thru an outlet and cord, you can actually WELD the cord's prongs to the outlet contacts. Then you may never remove it. I've seen this happen several times. The only solution is to replace both the outlet and the cord (or the plug on the cord).
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc posted for all of us...

What does this tell our esteemed audience?
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