Why don't ovens have temp gauges

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I mean the average residential oven. I've never seen one with a temp gauge. Is it because the oven manufacturers don't want you to know how inaccurate their ovens are compared with the setting on the knob?
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On 2/13/2011 10:27 PM, Van wrote:

Don't the newer digital readout stoves indicate oven temperature? I've never owned one but it only seems to be a logical feature to include.
TDD
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On Sun, 13 Feb 2011 22:36:49 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Yes, along with the digital set point, and often the clock and timer on the same indicator.
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On 2/13/2011 11:57 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I often repair commercial conveyor ovens (pizza) which have heavy duty versions of the same type control. Those ovens put out a tad more heat than a home kitchen stove. :-)
http://www.middleby.com/midmarsh/ps540.htm
TDD
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On 2/13/2011 11:36 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

We had a fairly new GE wall oven with digital therm. It was about 25 degrees off....there is a calibration maneuver, but with frequent power outages it was a pain to reset the stupid thing. The engineers who design appliances nowadays are doofusses who have never used a home appliance. My Kenmore washer, when set to "hot", squirts hot on and off to "save" energy. We kept the hwh set to "very warm", so the hot that the washer was trying to control wasn't really hot, but luke-warm.
Current washer has "auto fill", and apparently weighs the load to determine water level. If you open the lid at any point during the cycle, it will automatically fill up to max level. Stupid, stupid, stupid!
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On 2/14/2011 9:09 AM, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

It's those doofus engineers who have a special degree from Doofus U. :-)
TDD
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On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 11:19:02 -0600, The Daring Dufas

I thought you were the Dean of Dufas U. Is that different from Doofus U., rah rah?

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On 2/15/2011 3:43 PM, mm wrote:

No silly, "Dufas" is a proper name, "doofus" is an adjective. :-)
TDD
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On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 10:09:36 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

When I got my first replacement electric water heater, it was fine afaicr. When I got the second one (perhaps unnecessarily), 5 years ago, it was not hot, so I set the temp up a tiny bit twice, and it was hotter. But still not so hot I could burn myself. I likeed that, and couldnt' decide whether to make it hotter still.
Used to be one could adjust it without taking off the cover plate, but to keep the foam panel without holes, now the two screws, the cover, and the foam has to come out.
When I had to wash some dishes by hand, it suddenly occurred to me the water wasn't hot enough. Plus I already knew that if the bath water wasn't hot enough, once it was half full, the hot water couldn't correct that.
I think the guy I bought the hosue from recommended 140 and said it washed dishes better that way (even though the dishwasher has a heater. This was discussed here before, but I didn't mention the wh temp. )

That is stupid. I once found a washing machine, spent about 90 minutes fixing it, most of that time disassembling and repairing the lid switch. After I had the lid switch repaired, I stuck a paper wad in the switch so the lid always seemed to be closed. I guess I coudl have just bypassed the switch!
I do whole cycles with the lid open. I'm old enough not to stick my arm in.
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My Mom's electric stove has both a readout for the "set" temperature and the actual temperature, at least while the oven is heating up. In other words, you spin the knob to set the digital readout to 350 and you can watch a smaller number in the corner of the display climb towards 350.
To be honest, I don't recall if the "actual" temperature readout varies during the cooking and since she lives 300 miles away, I can't check tonight. :-)
My gas oven has a readout only for what it's set for. It reads "Pre" while it's warming up, but when it reaches the set point it beeps and displays the set point until the oven is turned off.
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You may trust your engineers, but I don't trust mine.
Even when monitoring the actual temperature with an internal "shelf" thermometer, and seeing it read exactly what the set-point says, everything - and I mean *everything* - takes longer to cook than the recipe - *any* recipe - says it should.
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snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net (DerbyDad03) writes:
| Even when monitoring the actual temperature with an internal "shelf" | thermometer, and seeing it read exactly what the set-point says, | everything - and I mean *everything* - takes longer to cook than the | recipe - *any* recipe - says it should.
Interesting. I can't say for all recipes, but I've noticed that roasts take significantly longer to cook than the minutes/pound label indicates-- sometimes twice as long. I have also checked the temperature with a shelf thermometer and it is spot on. This led me to wonder just what assumptions are implicit in those numbers. In particular, what starting temperature do they assume? I keep my refrigerator at 36F so if they assume starting at an average room temperature I can see how the time could be way off.
                Dan Lanciani                 ddl@danlan.*com
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?

I usually take a roast out of the fridge and hour or so before it goes into the oven so it warms a bit. I also roast at 400 minimum too, and get better results.
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Perhaps the most common error is cooking cold meat.
I know people convinced a steak on the counter for an hour turns to poison. -----
- gpsman
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On Feb 14, 1:19am, ddl@danlan.*com (Dan Lanciani) wrote:

me? rare is great. i have a friend who claims rare is any red at all showing, he is really medium well///////
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"Pre-" is commonly used two different ways in the English language.
1) Pre-x means "before x". (pre-dawn, prepubescent) 2) Pre-x means "do x before (and usually facilitating) something else." (predefine, pre-drill, pre-heat)
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pre
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I guess some of the new or more expensive ones do have a temp indicator. Mine is a simple GE XL44 gas stove with digital display, I think it's from circa 2002 maybe, I bought it used. Still even on a basic level stove I would think connecting the sensor to the digital display would be logical.
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On 2/14/2011 12:41 AM, Smitty Two wrote:

My guess is the don't want you to know how much it varies. My last oven was a Dacor piece of junk. It varied all over the place. When I contacted the factory, the person repeatedly read the line, "Industry standard for residential oven is that it can vary by 25 degrees" ... not saying if it + or - 25 or a range of 25. I later got the answer that it was a range of 25. I did extensive testing and found that its range was about 35 or 40 degrees. The authorized service people couldn't make it better. I gave up and lived with the stupid thing. 40 degrees is no problem for a big roast or something like that, but for a cookie or something that small, it is far to iffy. If you put it in at the top of the range, the cookie will likely be over crisp ... at the bottom of the range, it will not cook in the allotted time. About 8 years after that, I called the company and asked if they had ever fixed their problems. They offered a new control panel for free, but I would have to pay to have it installed and no, I couldn't do it myself. I bit, it was about 50% better. BTW, this oven had no temperature reading other than the set temp. A bit to their defense, it is hard to hold the temp tight, especially when one side of the cube keeps being opened and of course, you don't want overshoot for a red hot cal rod. But, I think they could do better. My present new Whirlpool has just as many dumb "features" designed in. For instance, when broiling, if you open the door, the upper cal rod shuts down. And then it takes forever to get cherry red again. It also shuts down at 500 degrees. How do you broil in an "oven" at 500 degrees? And you can't leave the door open. My old Dacor recommended broiling with the door open. For the few times I use the Whirlpool for top brown broiling ( use a gas grill for hunks of meat), I leave the door open and put a magnet on the latch to trick it into leaving the power on. That works for me. Sorry for the rant and partial hijack of the "Subject".
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This confirms what I suspected about the inaccurate temps. At work we have big industrial ovens for baking electronics and there are strong fans that circulate the air inside. The temp never wavers more than a degree, if that (until we open the door). Residential ovens would probably need fans to achieve the same accuracy but that would be more expense and noise.
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re: "Residential ovens would probably need fans to achieve the same accuracy but that would be more expense and noise."
They call them "convection ovens" and they are readily available in the consumer market in styles that range from toaster ovens to full ranges.
Google convection ovens
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