Why do they skip sizes of metric combo wrenches?

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On 11/5/2010 7:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Thanks for the size charts.

That 15 is curious as it is widely used in American cars. It happens to be just the size/strength needed for a lot of tough jobs.
as it is included in some

Which makes it doubly unlikely to ever be used.
Seems to me that where you see these useless sizes most often is in almost useless socket sets, where for a very low price they entice the customer with EVERYTHING.
Usually, just getting what you need is better than a lot of trash.
Jeff
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8,10,12 and 14mm are common on Japanese motorcycles. Most odd metric sizes are not uncommon either. I don't recall EVER running across a 9mm bolt anywhere, but I could be wrong.
On the other hand I have a cheap socket set that not only has 9mm, but 4.5, 5.5, 6.5 and I think 7.5... They're a waste of space for the most part.
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On 11/5/2010 11:20 PM, Larry Fishel wrote:

You might come across those odd metric sizes in imported electrical and electronic items. I see odd sizes in tape players, VCR's and other types of electromechanical gadgets.
TDD
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On 11/6/2010 1:17 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Some of the half sizes, but a 9MM?
Jeff

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Red Green wrote:

I had to check my set from Canadian Tire (Mastercraft)
4mm - 13mm in 1/4" socket wrench 10mm, 12mm - 19mm in 1/2" socket wrench
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On 11/5/2010 3:32 PM, Red Green wrote:

I've never used, or needed a 9. 10 and 11 is very common. 16's are often missing also, a greater chance of needing that then a 9.
There is nothing magic in having one of every whole number. I'd rather have an extended range than interim sizes I will never need.
Jeff
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In typed:

I remembered to check this out since I seemed to remember "9" as a metric socket size. They're old, but I have a 9 and all the way through 16 in both open-end wrench sets and both socket sets. IIRC I think I've used the 9 for somethiing on my Trailblazer; pretty sure, not positive. My metric-sae chart also includes 9. I suspect it depends on "how metric" the product is that you're working on. Cars & trucks these days seem to be all metric - the days of only 3/8" and 9/16" only are gone. They need to go back to mostly common sizes in metric like sae used to be; then you could outfit a diy toolbox with 4 or 5 wrence/socket sets. My sae goes from 3/16" up to 15\16" in 1/16" steps except for a couple 1/32" in the smaller ones. Perhaps the differences are industrial/commercal/residential grades of the tools.
HTH,
Twayne`
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.16.185.252:
My snap on set doesn't skip any of them.
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69.16.185.252:
neither does my set of Craftsman
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wrote:

I often buy myself Christmas presents. The sales are great! Last year I gave myself a Bosch 18V drill and Impactor for $200 and a Bosch Multi-Max w/12V driver (that I didn't need - already had one) for $139.
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I bought most of my tools 30 years ago when I worked in the trade. I have about %70 craftsman and %30 snapon. I changed careers but might as well keep the tools. One thing really nice about the snapon is that their stuff is really thin. I have occasionally encountered compact stuff where there was only enough clearance to get my snap on tools on. Saves extra removal work to get at something. Plus at that time you couldn't get the more unusual stuff like manifold wrenches and swivel head spark plug ratchets from craftsman. Not sure if craftsman has expanded their selection or not, I'm only ever there to exchange something broken. And none of my snapon has ever broke so I haven't been in a snapon truck in forever.
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On 5/29/2011 9:22 AM, jamesgangnc wrote:
in

I noticed the exact opposite thing at Lowes with Kobalt brand tools, especially pliers and wire cutters. They are guaranteed for life, but everything is so darn heavy. No wonder it won't break, it's so thick it's too hard to get a grip on it. OK, exaggerating a bit but it is so heavy that they can use cheaper steel. I have some Snap-On also and they are my best tools without a doubt.
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While I have some great stories attesting to the quality of older Snap-On combo wrenches, many mechanics preferred Mac Tools cuz of the thin edge of those pretty chrome Snap-On handles, which tended to dig into one's fingers when really leaned on. Snap-On started to cheapen, considerably. Their tape measures are relabeled Lufkins, which I consider junk. I also bought a finger trigger oil can that broke the first time I used it. Not all their stuff is the same quality as their once great wrenches, which I think were made for them by Bonney Tools. Another great US tool company that recently went belly up. :(
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t8460
nb
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<...snipped...>

Just FYI, Lufkin ceased making precision tools in 1966. In 1967 they were acquired by Cooper Industries. About a year later, after a labor strike, they ceased making tools under the Lufkin name. The big full-line tool companies still making hand tools in the US are Stanley, Snap-on, and Danaher. Interestingly, Cooper and Danaher recently announced some kind of joint venture for manufacturing tools using the name Apex.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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Just shows that one has to look at what they are buying. But yes, I have also noticed that metrics skip sizes in their wrenches, and when you notice it is when you need that oddball size.
Steve
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those sets grouped together on a commion fold out handle of US allen wrenches skip a size too. One I need every now and then:(
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I don't think it's meanness or cheapness, some of the sizes really aren't all that common. But yes, I have needed all of them at least up to about 21mm at least at one time or another :/ Because someone, somewhere needed to be different.
nate
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wrote post back in Nov.

I don't think it's meanness or cheapness, some of the sizes really aren't all that common. But yes, I have needed all of them at least up to about 21mm at least at one time or another :/ Because someone, somewhere needed to be different.
nate
But I do wonder about that one size in metric. All the other ones seem to be needed, and when I find a 9 or 11 mm bolt, I wonder why they didn't just do a 10. As for all bolts, there's nothing like a box end to get a good hold of it, and there's not really a good fit on a bolt with an adjustable wrench some times.
Steve
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A rusty 17mm nut may need the next size up wrench in order to be able to fit it, I've had this happen, its not bad idea to have those odd size wrenches
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On 9/12/2016 8:21 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How often has it happened? Started using metric tools about 1970 and have not needed one yet so I see no reason to buy a tool I don't ever need. Use an adjustable or pipe wrench once every 10 years that you need it. Be sure to get a metric adjustable .
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