Why do people buy the pre-mixed anti-freee?

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micky wrote:

There might be a case for pre-mixed windshield washer fluid: the orifices for spraying the water on the windshield are teeny-tiny indeed. They can be easily clogged by the smallest particle of precipitate from mineral-rich water.
On my old car, I kept a small length of very thin wire in an envelope in the car pocket for reaming out the spray holes. Bother.
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On 12/6/2011 8:55 AM, HeyBub wrote:

Interesting little tidbit about washer fluid. It is a kind of antifreeze mix too because that's one of the last things you want to freeze up. I believe there is more powerful deicing formula on the market too. I remember one of the network news programs contacting a fellow who was able to increase the gas mileage of a Ford Escort test vehicle by a substantial amount by using a fine water mist sprayed into the carburetor by mounting the nozzle in the top of the air cleaner and using a windshield washer reservoir and pump to supply the water. He used windshield washer fluid instead of plain water because it wouldn't freeze. This was on one of the big three network news programs years ago during one of the fuel crises. ^_^
TDD
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On Tue, 06 Dec 2011 21:52:59 -0600, The Daring Dufas

BTDT. A couple times. No damage to the pump. Still had the "summer" mixture in there when it turned cold. Now I always make sure I only put in the "winter" stuff. That's another one you could argue about mixing your own, but I never bothered. I always get the stuff when I spot it for 99 cents or 1.29 or thereabouts. Get 4 or 5 jugs. If you wait until you really need it the price is crazy.
--Vic
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On Mon, 05 Dec 2011 03:41:34 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Some cars, like Honda require that you use their antifreeze. If you look on the Honda newsgroup they will tell you the silicates in Prestone and other usual brands will kill a Honda water pump. Honda antifreeze is premix. Bullshit? probably but that is what the Honda dealer will tell you.
I like the "bad water" answer better. There are a lot of places that have horrible tap water and I would not use it in my car. OTOH why not just use distilled water at less than a buck a gallon instead of paying "antifreeze" prices for it.
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I'd hafta say so. I used plain water and any ol' generic brand of AF for 20 yrs in my Honda Civic. Never had a cooling system problem, ever, and this in sub-freezing to 110F+ CA.

Never heard that. Maybe on the newer ones. Mine was an '87.
nb
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That's like my friend bought a chainsaw. They told him that he MUST use their own brand oil to mix in the gasm which costs twice what the common 2 cycle oil costs. He told me about it, adn I told him to use the common stuff, as long as it's 2 cycle oil made for chainsaws and other small engines. I bet it all comes from the same refinery and even the same vat. Just another way to rip people off...
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Outboard motor oil is different than air cooled engine oil. But, you're right, about the profit stream.
For the jug of pre mix I carry or have on hand, I magic marker 50/50 on the jug in big black letters -- don't bother to buy premix for that, even.

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On Mon, 5 Dec 2011 11:13:28 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

I did not say anything about outboard oil in this thread...... I said the generic stuff made for chainsaws. The generic stuff is $3.50 a botle at Walmart while the stuff this dealer is selling is around $8.00 for same size bottle.
Yes I did ask about outboard oil some weeks ago in another topic. That has nothing to do with this thread.
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The antifreeze you use IS kinda critical on some of the newer stuff. And GM swore by Dexcool while the rest of the world swore AT it (and them) There are several different formulations - at least 2 of them being "organic acid" if I remember the term correctly - and the stuff made for the old cast iron engines is not terribly healthy for the newer all-aluminum engines.
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All the older antifreeze got corrosive after so long. I would add some anti corrosive additive between changes. I let it go too long once and my car got really ate up with rust. I hope I get it right with my truck which has aluminum engine, but how much worse could it be than a brown rusted steel block.
Greg
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I moved to the da desert in 74 and after using tap water for a couple years all I got was overheat in the 105 degree typical summer day. That water was very hard.
Greg
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On Mon, 05 Dec 2011 03:41:34 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

And why do they buy pre-mixed windshield fluid?

It's 90% water, and you have to store a gallon containter of the pre-mixxed stuff until you use it up, at which time you have to buy anot her gallon. When the concentrated clearer is only a pint or less.

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As the old circus guy, PT Barnum said, "f you build it, they will come" and so I guess if you market it, they will buy. Not me, though. Oddly enough, I also havn't been to the circus in many years, so maybe I'm not typical consumer.
I view it, like this. To buy a gallon of glycol, you'd need to spend $16 on the two jugs of premix. So, the gallon of water cost you $5. That's expensive water. Also, if I just finished flushing my system wtih the hose, I want the 100% stuff, as there is already water in the engine.
I have to read labels carefully, so I don't accidentally get the half water stuff.

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Stormin Mormon wrote:

The water in the pre-mix anti-freeze is WAY cheaper than the water in half-liter bottles sold by the millions every day. In a way, buying pre-mix is a bargain.
After all, if you won't put tap water in your body, would you put it in your car?
On the other hand, there's a certain satisfaction knowing your radiator is powered by Evian. . .
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On Dec 5, 4:41am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

99.9% of antifreeze sales are to people who simply want/need to "top off" their systems.
Top offs generally require less than one gallon of 50/50 mix, but the exact amount is not always known. Standard operating procedure is to make up a quantity of 50/50 pre-mix and add whatever is necessary to fill the system.
Problem is, I've got this fresh gallon of 100% antifreeze in a one gallon container. Now I have to hunt down another clean container to pour some of the antifreeze into so I can mix it. In typical shadetree mechanic fashion, I've filled most of my old antifreeze bottles with used motor oil, and tossed the ones I got sick of tripping over.
It's not an insurmountable problem, but it is inconvenient and usually aggravating.
The convenience factor of a bottle of premix when you only need a few cups here and there is worth a couple extra bucks.
I agree with you if you're going to flush and fill, but that's not what it's meant for. If people are foolish enough to buy the premix for a flush and fill, that's their problem not yours or mine.
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On Dec 5, 4:41am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

The last time I bought coolant, I bought a gallon of pre-mix. Why? The coolant in my truck was slightly low, but by the time it gets low again, it'll likely be time to have it flushed and changed - if I even still have the truck. So I bought more than I needed anyway, and didn't have to go find a measuring cup and funnel to top up the recovery bottle.
Now if you're doing a flush and fill, I agree, buying premix is dumb. If nothing else, when you flush, you're never going to drain *all* the water out unless you pull the block drains, and maybe not even then. So the correct procedure is to refer to the manual for system capacity, put in 50% (or whatever your desired concentration would be) of that amount of straight coolant, then top up with water.
nate
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For only the second time in my life, I bought some pre-mixed antifreeze last week, but only because Pep Boys had a Black Friday deal where it was free after $5 rebate.
The first time I bought 50/50 was by accident because I didn't know here was such a thing as pre-diluted antifreeze. I don't like pre- diluted because it's hard to remove all the water from the cooling system, so with 50/50 pre-diluted I'd end up with less than 50% antifreeze.
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Agreed...It's sort of like why do people go to McD's for a hamburger. It would be a lot cheaper to make your own and we all know you don't have to be Bobby Flay to make a better burger than McDonalds.
And don't even get me started on Charbuck$ burnt coffee.

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Sigmund Freud wrote:

Well, at $tarbuck$, at least the coffee's made with tap water.
I was at one last night (to meet a blind date). I asked for a cup of Folger's Instant.
"We don't have that," said the coffee jerk somewhat disgustedly.
"How close can you get?"
"How about a cup of Pike Mountan Blend?"
"Whatever. Surprise me," I surrendered.
Tasted like Folger's instant made with two scoops of coffee. And it only cost slightly more than two dollars. Including tax. And tap water.
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On 12/6/2011 9:06 AM, HeyBub wrote:

A few weeks ago, I installed a network cable for a new printer in a Starbucks and notices a water leak in their elaborate multi filter water supply for their beverage preparations. While I was there their corporate service guy showed up and replaced a big O-ring on one of four filters. Nice guy, ex navy submariner who worked on nuclear reactors if I remember right. I had to tease him about going from nukes to coffee but the pay is higher. Starbucks appears to take a lot of care of the water they use in their product. The filters looked like they filtered out all sorts of stuff even though the water quality in this area is excellent. o_O
TDD
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