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I never came across using aluminum foil tape as flashing. I have used it for ducts, for hot exaust pipes, and other uses. Flexible sticky flashing is now usually done with mineral based sheeting with polyethelene backing. Most auto parts stores sell metal tape. I used some stainless tape for covering chrome or chrome like parts. I just recently came across the cloth tape with mild stick, or gaffers tape. New to me. There are different backings for duck tape. I like using the remants of the not available anymore, 100 MPH tape from Sprotsman Guide, orginally used to repair aircraft wings. It has a stretch unlike most, and really holds up and sticks well.
greg
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G wrote:

An aluminum metal tape is also used to seal the seams between the metal-backed foam insulation on homes. The adhesive is permanent, and the tape is pretty expensive as such things go, but it keeps out the wind (and water) well.
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I wonder on what sort of construction?
In the UK where buildings pretty well all have stone walls, the lead flashing is bent into a 'chase' created in the masonry, usually the mortar between coarses, secured with lead wedges and mortar applied afterwards to seal. A lime based mortar is best to accommodate some movement. Down the edge of a roof where it meets the brickwork it will be cut into a step shape to follow the line of the horizontal bricks. And it's still very much in use today - despite the cost.
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

The edges of flat roofs, the edges of walls between abutting buildings (to prevent ingress of moisture between them) and around openings in roofs (such as hatches, chimneys and skylights).
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Steve Barker LT wrote:

This is a redirect to a 3M product spec page; for this item and others in the same category, there is _no_ reference to using the product on 'ducts' anywhere in the description.

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wrote:

I never really considered using the stuff on ducts. I always noticed after years, the tape would get hard, fall apart and become useless. Some types last longer, but the typical silver tape.
greg

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While it would seem to be perfect for ducts, the fall apart business seems to be the key to it usufullness. Read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duct_tape

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G wrote:

Seems to be a bit of a disaster to me.
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I'm not sure who you were asking, but the tape does not and can not be what holds the ducts together. It is merely for sealing the joint for anal types. Most ducts don't have tape on them.
s

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Steve Barker wrote:

If ducts are made properly, they should be locked together by a folded seam by which the ends of the ducts slide together and an edge is then folded over to lock it all together. Look up "pittsburgh seam" or "pittsburgh seaming" and "ducting" on Google.
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Metal duct is pretty rare in the south. They use fiberglass "duct board" that gets taped together with metal backed tape. When A/C is you main use, ducts are in the attic and humiidity is 90+ metal will sweat like a pig. Garden variety duct tape won't last a year.
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It IS duct tape however. What do you think it was originally designed for?
s

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On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 16:59:08 -0500, "Steve Barker"

duct tape was originally developed during World War II in 1942 as a waterproof sealing tape for ammunition cases
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

then why does it fail so rapidly when exposed to water or high humidity?
just curious,
nate
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wrote:

It is simply because the crap they sell at Wal-Mart is not GI grade (AKA 100 MPH duct tape). I had some I used on dive gear that held up for many years and regularly used under water. You can still buy it at some military type stores but it costs over $10 a roll.
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While perhaps not _quite_ Mil-Spec, you can get a very close equivalent at other places. Lee Valley carries it for example.
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Nate Nagel wrote:

and its many imitators.
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wrote:

The biggest failure is drying out.
greg
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Nate Nagel wrote:

version designed to be sold in big box stores.
If you go to a real supply house you can buy quality duct tape.
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and........ proceeding to the next paragraph........
:quoting from the same place you did:
The name "duct tape" came from its use on heating and air conditioning ducts,
end quote.....
steve

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