Why did back coil refrigerators vanish?

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I was wondering if anyone knows why the "old fashioned" back mounted coil refrigerators were replaced with bottom mounted coils?
Back coil mounts didn't become as filthy nor did they need a fan to blow air over them.
Just curious...
TIA!
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perhaps they were more subject to damage? and you have to move the fridge to clean them.
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Jim Yanik
jyanik
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Actually they did collect dust, but the primary reason for moving them underneat was to get the fridge closer to the wall. Looks better when the frige isn't enclosed and keep things stored on top from getting pushed off the back.
-- "Tell me what I should do, Annie." "Stay. Here. Forever." - Life On Mars
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Rick Blaine wrote:

Also, I have a fridge with the compressor and coils up top, and they too, get dirty.
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--- the primary reason for moving them underneat was to get the fridge closer to the wall
That, and the elimination of the need for ventilation above the unit.
If I'm not mistaken, you can't "build in" a fridge with coils on the back without providing gap above the unit for the heat to escape through. That can be difficult if there are cabinets directly above the fridge.
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I suspect it was when self-defrosting units came to be. They need some place to drain the water. The heat from the coils along with the fan works to evaporate the water from the drain pan so you don't need a drain through the floor.
Don Young
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They made self-defrosting units for a long time with coils in the back. The one I have now from mid 80s is made that way and I know they were made in the 70's with auto defrost and coils too. Not sure when the non-exposed coil units first appearerd, but I would guess 90's?
Definitely better, as you don't have to worry about the exposed coils in back when moving it and it goes back close to flush.
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On Sat, 13 Oct 2007 20:32:12 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

But there's a down side. Cleaning the under-fridge heat exchanger is a real pain.
I still have to pull out the fridge and unplug it.. Then, crawl on the floor, remove half-dozen hex sheet-metal screws from the back cover. ( this exposes the fan and the coils ( sort of ) ) Lots of dust.... worse if you have a dog or cat Squeeze the shop-vac hose into all the nooks and crannys. Try not to bend, break or disconnect anything. Replace access cover Rassle fridge back in place, and plug it in.
How many average households will do this once or twice a year ?
How many will have poor performance or shorter appliance life due to clogged coils...
It was alot simpler when Momma could roll out the fridge, run the vac hose over the ( exposed ) coils, and roll it back. clogged heat <rj>
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My best guess at this is because people are stupid, and don't read the manufacturers recomendations which specify minimum distances around the refrigerator (specifically to dissipate the heat). Sine they know you are going to cram in a refrigerator that will take up nearly 100% of the space available, they put it at the bottom so they can vent it out the bottom front.
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replying to , Frustrated wrote: Absolutely! I would gladly have the "ugly" back coils again, at least you could keep an eye on them and clean when necessary. Just learned the hard way that vacuuming the front grill cover like manual says does absolutely nothing. The condenser coils are zigzagged underneath in a way no vacuum can reach. Have a 2 year old warped and ruined bamboo floor to remind me now that I should have bought the brush (that no one tells you about) and been cleaning this inaccessible part every 6 months or so.
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On Thursday, April 21, 2016 at 12:44:06 PM UTC-4, Frustrated wrote:

h.

ing

I have one refrigerator where the coils are horizontal and stacked. That s pecial brush will get between them.
But my other one has angled coils in a \/\/ configuration (side view). Fro m the front you can vacuum the front \ of the coil. By moving away from th e wall and taking the machine screws out and removing the back cover, you c an vacuum the / of the coil. Well, part of it. That compressor makes acce ss tricky.
However there is no way to get vacuum or brush anywhere near the inner /\ c oils. I blow them off with a can of spray air, as best I can. It's better than nothing but doesn't really clean them.
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Or put it on the back deck and take the water hose to it. That will remove a lot of what air won't touch.
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Don't see why not. The crud I've seen on some condenser coils - and on dehumidifiers - would never come off with an air hose and would require a bit of work with a water hose
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On 4/21/2016 11:54 AM, TimR wrote:

There is a way to clean them. I followed what this guy did on Youtube.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ms28ypfO2Jw

It does work. Just be very very sure that all three sides are completely sealed or the dust will come flying out and go everywhere. I tried using foam pipe insulators jammed in between the cabinets and the side of the refrigerator. This did not stop all the dust from escaping out the sides.
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replying to TimR, dirt wrote: Mine is the same. Its impossible to get to the inner coils. I tried bending the special brush at a 45 degree angle to get to it. Does not do a decent job. Please, does anyone have a better way?
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On 8/7/2016 9:14 AM, dirt wrote:

The last time I had this problem, I had the gardener come in and blow it out with his leaf blower. Seriously. I wheeled the fridge over to the door so the stuff would blow outside.
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On Sunday, August 7, 2016 at 12:15:42 PM UTC-4, Taxed and Spent wrote:

think compressor. can make a dirt. put fridge or whatever outside so the dust blows away.
i have fixed office machines for a lifetime. there was a nun in charge of a catholic school. they used super cheap paper in the copier. clean up was a mess. one day i moved the copier outside and blew the paper dust out with compressor.
it was a windy day, the dust blew away, but the nun was mad i had done this.. till i reminded her it saved her 75 bucks for a hours labor, with my vacuum and artists brush....
she said ok but dont do it again......
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bob haller posted for all of us...

She didn't have the kids clean the erasers by banging them against the outside wall?
--
Tekkie

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Mon, 08 Aug 2016 04:01:41 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

Hehehe. Those were in some of the grade schools i've had the... ehm, pleasure of attending some years ago.

It's been a very long time.
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Hmmm. I most certainly don't understand how I can access a copy of a
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replying to , James Printy wrote: Amen! The only way I can figure how to clean the coils underneath the frig is tape a plastic garbage bag on the front of frig, take back off, and drag my air hose from garage into kitchen and blow the dust out. Garbage bag traps most of dust but not all and cleaning the blade on blower is a pain too. Like to have the old ones with coil on back.
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