Why cant I grow grass?

I have a small lawn that is shaded on one end. Since I have owned the house the shaded part was mostly dirt.
I dug up and turned the soil over and layed sod in this area. I also turned over the soil and planted shady grass seed in the area between the existing grass and the new sod. I also patched up areas one the grassy side to fill it in. Within a week or so the grass and sod looked beautiful almost golf course like.
But now 3 weeks-4 weeks later all the new areas have thinned quite a bit (sod, patches, seeded areas). The original grassy area looks the same.
I tried fertilizing the lawn 4-5 days ago and so far no difference, everyday the lawn looks worse. More dirt less grass.
I have watered it quite a bit and it has rained quite a bit too.
Does anyone have any sugestions why this might be happening and how to fix it?
Also no one has been on the grass as its a fairly unused lawn.
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Know that rec.gardens exists.
wrote:

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Don't bother trying to grow good looking grass in shade, grass is a sun loving plant.
Consider alternatives for ground cover. Trying to make something grow where it does not do well is just asking for a lot of work and little return.
Sorry.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Depends on where you live and what kind of grass. My lawn is half shade and half sun. It's also half grass and half dead grass/dirt. The living, healthy, gorgeous grass is in the shade.
--
Andrew L. Duane (JOT-7) snipped-for-privacy@zk3.dec.com
HP/Compaq Corporation snipped-for-privacy@compaq.com
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@hotmail.com said...

Nothing like advice from an ignorant person. Isn't that what usenet is all about?
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The original writer indicated that the grass in the non-shade areas was ok and the grass in the shade was not. Not said by inferred was that it was an established situation.
Now it is possible that the soil conditions and or type of grass might be wrong and could be fixed, but most of the time when these conditions exist they exist because of the excessive shade. Even a change in type of grass and soil improvement will not eliminate the shade which caused the condition in the first place.
That is why I suggest it would be a lot of work and little return. I stand by that statement. base on the information provided. While it may be your opinion that I am ignorant, you are free to make that mistake. I doubt if your opinion will make much difference to either of us.
Sometimes the best advice is to admit defeat.
It may be that my reading of the original message was wrong and one or more of the ideas suggested may be helpful, but in the end, grass in shade is seldom successful.
I noticed that neither you nor Andrew had any ideas to offer.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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And the answer is--sod or plant St.Augustine grass in shaded areas, since no other grass is as shade tolerant. Kentuck blue grass and Bermuda grass just will not grow in shade so homes with fully shaded areas have to rely on St. Augustine or ground covers (Asiatic jasmine, English Ivy).
Regards,
John
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Contact you local extension office and get a soil test. Mine was about $8.00. They sent me a nice printout telling me exactly what my soil needed to grow grass. Weight to area ratio's for fertalizer for example. I was very happy with the response and have had much better success with my grass. My lawn is rather shady and amending the soil properly really worked. (properly being the key word, my yard was very scarcein some of the much needed nutrients) Hope this helps. kraM

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year to try this.
It's not unusual for new seed to come in very lush and thick initially and then thin out a bit, but when it's very young and then goes into the heat of July and August as well the results are predictable.
Try overseeding the seeded area again later this month. You don't mention where you are located, but in the northern US and Canada you can use creeping red fescue seed for a shade seed. I've had great results w/ this seed even on poor soils and very shady areas. You must be patient though. It may take a couple of years to really fill in.
btw. you don't want to fertilize your lawn in the summer. Spring and fall are the times when you stimulate it.
Peter H
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Why not ask your neighbors? They have the same soil, weather, etc.
FWIW, the half of my lawn thats in the shade needs to be mowed every couple days in the summer, while I don't mow the sunny parts for weeks at a time.
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Just about all grass needs *some* sun to grow well. Be extra careful with the fertilizer--it can burn especially if the ground is dry during the summer months. One way to give your grass more light is to remove trees or branches. If your grass dies anyway, you may want to consider another more shade-tolerant ground cover that grows well in your climate.
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I hired a landscaper to sod my small back yard. There was a huge bare spot under one of the trees all the way to the house. This is the north side of the house. The landscaper said (we heard this from more than one) he would be happy to sell me more sod, however, in 2 years it would be back the way it was when he first looked at it. Therefore we planted paver bricks and a planting birm for all kinds of ornamentals that like shade. Also, if you plant things that would normally take off in the sun (weedy things), in the shade, they stay nicely under control.
Phisherman wrote:

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Frankenberry wrote:

on the variety. If the grass is in dense, full shade the entire day, it likely will die. If shade is such that you can trim/lift trees to bring more light it may improve the situation. If not, then a different ground cover may work much better. Under trees, the ground can dry faster because the trees take up a lot of water. When you water, do you water deep or just surface? There can be pests involved, such as fungus or grubs, but you can't diagnose those on the internet. Try taking a couple of plugs of grass from the problem area, along with a scoop of soil from 4-5 spots to your county extension service if they do soil testing. They should be able to tell you whether the soil is the problem. No sun = no grass. All grass has to have some sun.
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On Thu, 14 Aug 2003 17:25:35 +0000, Frankenberry wrote:

Is it a tree causing the shade? What kind of tree? Some trees, black walnuts among them, give of a toxin to better allow them to compete. I have a magnolia that manages to kill anything out to the leaves drip line. If this is your problem, there are some solutions. Do a search on allelopathic.
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