Why Can't You Lay Refrigerator Down??

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When my small chest freezer was delivered, the UPS guy flipped it end over end to get it up the stoop by himself. No wonder it periodically gurgles.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On 01/06/2016 11:48 AM, Don Wiss wrote: ...

That'd be beyond pale in my book...it'd gone back on their nickel he done that to me (and I knew it, of course).
--


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About 45 years ago, shortly after I finished High School, I moved into a run-down "Furnished" house. One day our refrigerator quit getting cold. It ran, but did not get cold. We called the landlord, and he came over (drunk as he always was). He told us to remove the contents, then he asked us to help him move it outside to the porch.
We thought he was going to bring us another fridge, but instead, as soon as we got it to the porch, he just pushed it off the porch. That porch was 3 to 4 feet off the ground. The fridge crashed on it's side onto the concrete sidewalk. We just stood there wondering what the hell he was doing. He sat down and said "now we gotta wait", and he drank another pint of some sort of booze. A half hour later he said "Lets put it back on the porch". So we help him get it back on the porch. It's all dented up, but he asks if we have an extension cord. We got one and he ran the cord thru a window and plugged the fridge into it.
He got himself another bottle to drink and said "now we gotta wait". I must admit I, and everyone else was completely amazed to find that within a half hour that fridge was cold again.....
The landlord told us to take it back into the house by ourselves and he left.... (But before he left, he said "now you guys know how to fix a refrigerator").
Although we did not live there very long, that dented up fridge continued to work for months afterwards. UNBELIEVABLE!
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replying to Offred, Offred wrote:

an
work
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yourself.
All three freezers sat for a week. I didn't know they had to be set for a day or so after transport. I never heard that this is a problem with big freezers so why is the compressor so different? Each was at an angle for only a few seconds during transport. After installed each were powered up immediately which apparently was a big mistake. I did not let them sit. I guess by starting them up right away rather then let them sit, damage to the compressor resulted. But seriously, three freezers all failing, transported and installed at 45 d angle at worst? What's wrong here? And there must be a way to fix this, Is the compressor permanently damaged? Is there any way to tell?
I just wish there was a warning in big letters on the shipping box. Years ago I got a Haier, took it home at a 45 d angle and it worked fine. The new ones are China junk.
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On 1/6/2016 4:44 PM, Offred wrote:

Around here, they pay you $35-50 when they haul it away. Your taxes at work protecting the environment.

The way I heard it, when you lay it over, oil in the compressor may find its way into the exit pipe. When you turn it on, oil makes its way to and plugs up the (whatever they use as) expansion orifice...game over.
Presumably, oil in the big part of the pipe can make its way back into the compressor if you let it sit. Once it's in the capillary tube, it has a hard time getting out.
What you did after you touched it may be irrelevant after a boat trip from China in whatever position it happened to be.
When they delivered my fridge, they started it immediately. No problems. But they carried it pretty-much upright all the way.
50 years ago, I hauled the fridge from college back home. 100 miles on its side in a trailer. Was dead when it arrived home.
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On Thu, 07 Jan 2016 00:44:01 +0000, Offred

Unplug them, let them sit for at least 24 hours, plug them back in. I have doubts that the compressors was damaged, but you may need to let them sit idle for a day, so the refrigerant can settle.
If that dont fix them, push them off your porch, wait a half hour, put them back on the porch, wait a half hour, then plug them in.... :)
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On Apr 12, 2:02 pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

There are two reasons. One is the one you stated which is sometimes fixed by leaving it up right for an hour or two on some designs. On others the oil can get into the cylinder of the compressor and cause a hydraulic lock. There are lots of different sorts on compressor, that's the problem
The other is that some compressors are spring mounted (for silent running) and the compressor can fall off the springs. Especially if it's on it's back/side and jolted about in transport.
The compressor is inside the metal lump low down at the back.
So best not to tip it over, it may or may not be OK, no-one can say for sure.
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t

n

a

g

p

r

get friend with larger vehicle to do hauling
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On Fri, 12 Apr 2013 09:02:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

I've moved many refrigerators by laying them down but only just long enough to move them from one house to another, rarely for more then 30 to 40 minutes. I always make sure I lay them down with the compressor on the "down" side when it's on it's side. I have never had a problem and I typically plug them back in within an hour of delivery. I'm sure that the warning is true if you were going to lay it down and leave it on it's side for quite a while, like hours and hours or longer.
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What did the vendor say when you asked?
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Friday, April 12, 2013 3:25:05 PM UTC-4, Don Phillipson wrote:


Like some snot-nosed pimply-faced teenager is going to know anything about refrigerators?
Hell, even the store manager... He's probably got thousands of products in his store. Do you realistically believe he knows EVERYTHING about EVERY product in the store?
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On Friday, April 12, 2013 9:02:34 AM UTC-4, MICHELLE H. wrote:

Yup, it's right there in black and white on the box...
I sincerely doubt you could fit one of those fridges in a Chevy Cavalier, even laying down! Judging from the topsoil thread your sense of space calibration is way off.
The helpless woman without a friend in the world routine is only going to get you so far in life. You need to advance to the helpless single woman with several male friends who own trucks and are tripping over themselves to lend a hand stage.
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Michelle:
Try phoning the company's 1-800 customer service phone number. I can't fit it in my head that any fridge could be permanently damaged by laying it on it's side. Almost certainly that warning is on the box to disuade people from buying the fridge who are planning to USE it in a position other than upright.
--
nestork


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On Fri, 12 Apr 2013 09:02:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

Two considerations. One is the oil thing and yes, standing it up for a while should take care of it.
The other is shipping damage. I don't know how the compressor is mounted,but it is designed to travel standing upright. Bouncing in a truck for a couple hundred miles can possibly cause damage if it is on the side. A half hour in a gently driven vehicle would be OK. Watch for pot holes.
If would be good if you knew more about the design but it would not be readily available. . One side may have more or less damage potential than another, but you'd have to know about the design of the unit.
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MICHELLE H. wrote:

It is true. Putting a fridge on its side may damage the appliance, void the warranty, and cause you to lose your entire investment, including sales tax.
Why, oh why, would you question the manufacturer's admonition - printed in large letters on the box and, no doubt, in the instructions and warranty information - to not do so?
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On 4/12/2013 9:02 AM, MICHELLE H. wrote:

Go online and check the owners manual. The better appliance manufacturers have detailed moving instructions. Some will advise you to transport on the left side, some right side. It all depends on how it's built.
If it's a cheap piece of Chinese crap with no info available, just stand it back up for 24 hours before you plug it in. If it pukes you're not out much anyway.
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On 4/12/2013 8:02 AM, MICHELLE H. wrote:

I've been watching this thread and I always recommend to anyone who must lay a residential refrigerator on its side to determine where the compressor is and make sure it is at the lowest point when you lay the fridge on its side. To be safe you can let it sit upright for 24 hours but I've never seen one damaged from being run after being laid on its side or run just right after being set upright. The oil will be blown back to the compressor anyway and the thermal overload on the compressor will click on and off until things stabilize. I think many of them have rotary compressors now and those darn things are hard to damage. I even saw a solid state dorm sized fridge one day a a retailer and it didn't have a compressor. You can run one of those upside down if you wished to, you may have a problem with condensate draining but college students don't care about things like that. ^_^
TDD
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On Sat, 13 Apr 2013 08:31:29 -0500, The Daring Dufas

I doubt very much this fridge is solid state or it would not have this warning on the box. And the OP would likely have told us.

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On 4/13/2013 12:26 PM, micky wrote:

You did notice "dorm sized" when I wrote about the solid state fridge? You pick those up and set them in your shopping cart then slide it into the back of your minivan. ^_^
TDD

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On Sat, 13 Apr 2013 14:57:47 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Isn't the OP"s fridge also dorm sized? Yes. At any rate, I didn't want to lose track of the OP's situation.

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