Why can't I find a polarized replacement plug.

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wrote:

You should not be using 2 wire extention cords for anything other than lights -
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On Fri, 20 Feb 2015 18:17:21 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Thanks for your concern. Maybe not, but I do.
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micky wrote:

Hi, Right, as long as every one knows what (s)he is doing with anything like you do. Most Christmas light strings come with 2 prong plugs polarized now.
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wrote:

ANd very few 2 wire plugs are adequate for a 8, 10, or 12 amp vacuum. Might be OK for a $49 walmart special that draws 3 amps and can't pick up confetti, bread crumbs, or pet hair.
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On Fri, 20 Feb 2015 22:20:25 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I meant to say very few 2 wire extention cords.
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I've seen the same problem in my area. You can't find a polarized plug next to the light bulb display at the local supermarket. You may not even be able to find a non polarized plug, except perhaps at the dollar store and it looks like it would melt the moment you put juice on it. Perhaps society has decided we can't replace a plug without burning down the house? For a very long time in the UK appliances didn't come with a plug? You had to wire the plug yourself because different areas of the country used different style plugs. Today in the USA a hardware store (if you can find one) or a Home Depot or Lowes might have what you need, but not a mainstream big box store.
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wrote:

Yes, I'm sure you're right.

So that's what add-on means. That means Priime is not as good as one might think. I'm not going to pay a yearly fee for something I might not use even once. I used to buy a lot from Amazon, bur for one reason or another, it's been 6 months and it might be a year more. I had about 25 things in the Pending list, partly to bring me up to 25 dollars when needed, or 35, and when I went through them after a year, either they didn't sell them anymore or I didn't want them or both.

Absolutely it's fair, and like you say, we were supposed to have paid it anyhow.

Incuding me.

That's sort of like a drug-dealer gving the first couple grams for free. Unless you can keep your kid in college for 50 years.

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On 2/19/2015 11:08 PM, Marilyn & Bob wrote:

Where have you looked? I'd check at a hardware store, with a helpful handy man. I looked on www.amazon.com and typed "polarized electrical plug" in the search box. I got some other items, but several perfectly good plugs that would suit your needs.
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On Thu, 19 Feb 2015 23:08:39 -0500, Marilyn & Bob

I sympathize with the OP. It seems very hard to find a 2-prong polarized plug that is reasonably small. Though I have both a 2 prong and a 3-prong plug like the big ones suggested here, there is nothing inside my house (except maybe a large power tool that I don't have yet) that I would use one for.
I don't see any reason why a polarized plug for a small appliance has to be bigger than the smallest permissable non-polarized plug. Is there a reason?
One can't even easily find an attachable 2-prong polarized plug that is as small as the original 2-prong polarized plug that came on the cord of the appliance. Why is that?
And why have they put wider skirts at the base of the plastic on 2-prong plugs, like in this picture:
http://www.c2g.com/uk/static/content/images/resources/connector-guides/450/089_2_prong_power_iso.jpg
Why can't you get polarized plugs like plugs 1 and 3 in this picture, or just a trifle thicker if necesssary? http://cdn1.bigcommerce.com/server1700/0hnz9jf/products/75/images/370/plugs-2prong-nonpolarized-1__63425.1409980050.1280.1280.jpg?c=2
Is this to prevent 3 items from being plugged into narrow 3-in-1's cube tabs like several I have. Don't they trust us anymore to keep track of how many things are used at one time and how much current each one draws. If we can't be trusted why to they allow the sale of cube-taps at all? When I have a 2-prong plug whose plastic base is wider than needed and so wide it interferes with plugging something in next to it, I take a saw and cut off 3/16" or so of the plastic.
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wrote:

Don't. There is a reason OHSA does not allow spliced cords. you would have to solder the connections for them to take the tension and be close to the original cord diameter, and solfering fine stranded cord concentrates bending strain at the solder joint and the splice WILL fail
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wrote:

Do it your way - you will anyway. There IS a reason a spliced or repaired cord on a worksite will be flagged by OSHA and a fine issued. I know OSHA has no authority over what you do in your own home - but soldered connections don't pass inspection in aircraft terminals either, for the same reason.
For the others on the list who may listen to reason - Heat shrink helps stabilize the joint - yes, but particularly in the case of a self retracting cord on a vacuum DON'T DO IT.
And if using a screw-attached replacement plug on the retractable cord, make sure you put a "buffer ball" on the cord to take the hit when the cord hits the end winding in, or you will tear the plug off unless you use a heavy-duty plug with a good cord clamp.
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+1
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On 2/23/2015 5:42 AM, CRNG wrote:

A properly spliced joint with a molded on plug is much better than using a screw terminal plug. It's all sealed against water when you're done and the wires won't pull out due to loose screws or a kid yanking on the cord rather than the plug.
The best solution is a complete cord replacement with a molded plug.
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When I returned from overseas I needed to change a couple of plugs from Euro style to US, for dual voltage appliances.
I found plenty of plugs, but they appeared to be of very poor quality, even from the specialty hardware stores.
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On 2/23/2015 7:23 AM, TimR wrote:

There are some very good, two prong, polarized, plugs available but they aren't small. They have a pretty big plastic body because of the screw terminals inside and because of the strain relief system.
These are two good ones:
http://www.mcmaster.com/#6755k71 (1.26" diameter) http://www.mcmaster.com/#71435K23 (diameter not specified)
It's usually better just to replace the whole power cord if possible. It doesn't cost any more for a good power cord, it's just more work to take the appliance apart. For less than $3 you can buy a 14-3 or 18-3 IEC power cord. For under $5 you can buy a hospital grad 16-3 cord. You can buy a polarized two conductor cord for under $2.
A canister vacuum cleaner is a little more complex because often they have self-retracting cords and you do want to replace the plug and not the cord. Even the ones with non-retracting cords usually have a very long cord. In those cases I'd advise using one of the high-quality two prong polarized plugs like the ones from McMaster. You want something rugged on a vacuum cleaner. It really doesn't matter if the plug is a little larger than the original. Worst case the plug doesn't go all the way into the storage area when the cord is retracted.
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On 2/23/2015 11:31 AM, sms wrote:

Why do you say that these plugs are polarized? Nothing in the text indicates that this is so. Again the diagram indicates the receptacle configuration for NEMA 1-15. NEMA 1-15 plugs can be either polarized or not. Both will fit into the shown NEMA 1-15 receptacle. I have seen plugs like this and the are NOT polarized.
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On Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at 11:41:15 AM UTC-6, Marilyn & Bob wrote:

Buy this for crap sakes and be done with it: (Amazon.com product link shortened)24405497&sr=8-4&keywords=2-prong+polarized+plug
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On 2/24/2015 9:41 AM, Marilyn & Bob wrote:

I sent an e-mail to McMaster and asked them. They replied that it was polarized. You can do the same to confirm it.
I think it would be unlikely for any of those higher end plugs to be non-polarized. Non-polarized are used for lamps and little AC adapters, but not for appliances.
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wrote:

I just bought 3 new lamps today - and guess what - ALL 3 had polarized plugs
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On Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at 8:10:15 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Which is what you'd expect. You want the contact in the bottom of the socket to be energized, not the screw base. I can't say that I've paid attention, but I wouldn't be surprised if all new lamps like that have polarized plugs.
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