Why can't electronics on new washers & dryers be tougher?

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They all appear to have various bells & whistles - specific setting for various fabrics, variable speed this, sensor something or other that, various lights, LED time remaining readout etc. etc
In contrast, the Speed Queen front load units at the laundromat have about 4 buttons for different temps and that's it - a mechanical pointer gauge indicates approximately where it is in the cycle. It might adjust the water level depending on the load size but I can't say for sure. If there's a front loader made in a similar barebones way for the home market I haven't seen one at Home Depot or Lowes. You'd think there would be a market for it. I assume those commercial units are expensive.
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brassplyer wrote:

They are, but they last forever. Buy one, & you'll never need to buy another one. Contrast that to the modern domestic units, where you'll be lucky to get 3 years out of them.
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brassplyer wrote:

The EU has made it less bullettproof by insisting on lead-free solder. It doesn't like vibration.
Graham
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The majority are brainwashed to need a new one every 2 years without question. Any company that builds to last more than 2 years will be competing with itself and others and will fail because no one will pay twice as much for a 4 year old model. Sure it is wrong to generate so much waste, but you go out of business first, OK?
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Hmmm, do you think companies WANT their products to last forever? Of COURSE these circuits can be made bulletproof, but have you heard of "planned obsolescence"? Washing machine companies want to sell washing machines. That means people's old washing machines need to irreparably break. So, they design an electronics board with a finite lifespan, produce a finite number of spares at the time of the original production run, and when those spares are gone that machine is junk. Maybe that board is repairable, but the labor involved to fix it is huge. Maybe they've stuck a proprietary IC or 2 on there which fails so it CAN'T be fixed no way no how.
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That is part of what got theAmerican car companies in trouble. Also no one wants to pay more for a good product.
The old Comodore computer company had a replacement policy where you could send the computer to them and they would repair it for a flat fee. They had some unskilled labor to open up the case , throw out the electronics and install new electronics. The new board cost them $ 50, the repair cost to coustomers was around $ 70 to $ 80. Cheeper to throw out the whole exectronics and replace it than the labor to repair them.
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often,a circuit board has it's IC's under globs of epoxy;called chip-on- board,and not repairable. They glue the bare silicon IC die(chip) directly to the board and wire-bond to circuit pads,then cover with epoxy.
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fee.
electronics
30 years (or so) ago, GE simply replaced defective electronics with a refurbished unit. The unit you sent in was placed in a pile, to be repaired at a later date. This probably worked well, if a technician worked on four or five identical units at the same time.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

I've obtained a lot of electronic stuff for free that only needed simple repairs. I get computer mother boards that cost $100.00 new and all they need is a keyboard fuse that is easy (for me) to replace. A lot of people who claim the title "service technician" have no idea how to repair a circuit board. Many of the problems I see with modern gear are caused by cold solder joints on the circuit boards.
TDD
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If you are doing it for yourself and do not count your time that is fine. If you are paying someone to repair it, you are looking at around $ 50 or more per hour labor. It may take several hours to get everything set up, do the repairs and test out the finished results. I used to do some repairs and still do on equipment that does not have the smd or other components that take special equipment to work on.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

I tell customers all the time, this may not be economical to repair unless you are very attached to it. Sometimes a special piece of equipment is worth $85.00 per hour to them.
TDD
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