Why can't electronics on new washers & dryers be tougher?

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I see these newer dryers and front-load washers have what I assume to be some kind of IC control circuitry and from what I've seen my suspicions about this being a likely point of failure appear to be correct. LG warranties the motor for 10 years but the circuit board only for 2. I'm betting it's expensive to replace too.
For as many years as this technology has been around, why can't the control circuitry be made more bulletproof?
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cost, manufacturers use OEM ONLY boards, so when they decide a model is obsolete there are no other parts sources.
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brassplyer wrote:

It would probably cost them $10.00 more per washer/dryer. The company bean counters look at it as a cost of the whole company output. If the manufacturer builds a million units, it would be another ten million in production costs.
I repaired a problem with an electric clothes dryer equipped with digital controls last week. The dryer was acting weird and would not behave itself. It turned out to be a loose connection at the circuit breaker. The arcing of the bad connection was putting electrical noise on the power circuit and the electronics and digital displays were going nuts.
TDD
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brassplyer wrote:

There are companies who will repair washing machine modules at very resonable prices. here in the UK one such company is QER in Workington. http://www.qer.biz/servReps.htm
Ron(UK)
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For long life look at Commercial units, they cost double but our last set lasted 35 years , until they fell apart from rust. Nothing is made like it used to be, but look at the prices from 10-20 yrs ago, prices are nearly the same so corners are cut.
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The obvious solution to this problem is to buy laundry equipment with conventional electro-mechanical controls. (Assuming they're still made.) My GE washer and dryer are over 10 years old, and I expect them to last at least another 15.
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On May 31, 10:55am, "William Sommerwerck"

That's why we are sticking with older style (still available) electro- mechanical control appliances. Also keep around useful bits and pieces of items that may go wrong! Presently for example, we are using a well used dryer that cost, some years ago, one dozen beer (then about $16 Canadian). Guy advertised it; called him up asked him what kinda beer he liked and was there within the hour on other side of this small city in my pickup. He and I got it up some rather steep basement stairs (I'm in my mid 70s!) and asking him why he was getting rid of an ostensibly good dryer he said "The wife wanted a new dryer/washer pair"! Got it home, downstairs by myself and plugged it in; although my neighbour always ready to help. It's worked fine ever since, although I did change the plastic hose to a metalized one; apparently insurance companies have reported older plastic ones can sometimes cause fires! The only repair need at time was to remake the electrical connection of the cord on the back before pushing it into position. It had not, originally been done very well and the outer shell of the rubber cord had sprung out of the anchor/connector at the dryer. Our 20 to 25 year old top load washer washer was rebuilt some 5+ years ago using the tub out of a relative's washer that had transmission problems (something to do with a bad batch of steel back then?). It also needs a look at one contact on the timer, it occasionally does not complete the last two-three minutes of its spin cycle. Got a spare timer from an identical washer on hand anyway. Finally replaced the venerable (30 years?) dish washer. It worked OK but was really noisy and getting quite grungy, with a free one, which needed only one minor repair (open solenoid coil on water inlet valve) not as quiet as the most modern ones but it washes better than the one it replaced. We are on our third/fourth used stove; but the main point is that none of these appliances have electronic controls and my level of technology and spare parts allows for repairing them at low/zero cost. New electronic control 'boards' etc.are reputed to cost in excess of $70? One can currently get a complete used appliance for less than that! If the electronic control board goes faulty in a microwave appliance it is usually necessary to scrap the whole thing. Know what you are doing though. DC voltages of 5000 and microwave radiation that can 'cook' human flesh and eyes are present.
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My
I recently saw on Craig's List one Whirlpool/Kenmore direct-drive top load washer for free that said it needed a new clutch. I saw another one for free that said it needed a new motor. Either of these are easy repairs on a direct-drive. If I had room to store them I would have gotten them for my daughters (if they ever move out).
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Ulysses wrote:

If you collect enough of them, your daughters will HAVE to move out! ;-)
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Hell, you can swap daughters for appliances. ;^)
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wrote:

That's a good plan, but hard to implement. When my washer last died, the problem was a riveted switch/relay assembly that's no longer made; I was able to patch in a relay in parallel with the defunct component, because the schematic was printed on the box.
It wouldn't have been easy to trace the fault without the schematic, and it would have taken a lot of remachining to fix 'just like new'. The fault was with conventional controls that were mass-produced in complex assemblies. My replacement relay was a tiny gold-plated aircraft/military part, with four times the capacity of the original.
So, for repairability, you need (1) conventional controls (2) conventional (no surprises inside) components, preferably labeled (3) documented functional blocks, so you can determine what function failed.
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Hi!

They most certainly are. It's still quite possible to buy (at least in the US) a washer or dryer with conventional, non-microcontroller-based controls. Even some of these fancy-dancy front loaders are made that way:
http://greyghost.mooo.com/doingthelaundry/bigpics/newwasher.jpg (494x691, 20KB).
I've been inside it once, and the internals are what you'd expect of a machine much older. The timer is a simple mechanical one, water level is detected by vacuum, and while the drum motor has an electronic controller, it looks to be well made.
How it's possible to not make the microcontroller-based controls work reliably for years and years is beyond me. Makers of microwave ovens have managed to do so for years. I've *never* seen a microwave oven with a dead control panel.
William
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William R. Walsh wrote:

I have, several times.
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Bob Larter wrote:

Dozens of them.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I've never seen a microwave quit for any reason. AND if it did, i'd get out another $69 and buy a new one.
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Exactly. I just tossed away a 23 year old Jenn Air microwave that had electronics and it was still working fine. I'm not convinced the premise that washers and dryers with electronics are inherently more prone to failure than other units is valid. I see most people in this group with actual problems that are in the area of switches, motors, water level sensors, solenoid water valves, etc.
Also, if you want to go a long way to protecting ALL your appliances and electronics, you should install a whole house surge protector.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

When I moved into my new old house, a supressor was installed on the electric meter. I did not want to pay for the service and didn't. I wonder if they took it off ?
I work on stuff all the time where spills will take out the ecectronics. They build it that way. Centrifuges and shaker tables in mind.
greg
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Steve Barker wrote:

And another piece of Chinese crap, a year later? I see a pile of dead microwaves every time I haul my recyclables to the landfill. I have a brand new Westinghouse microwave, still in the carton, but I prefer the 20 year old one, because it is higher power, and cooks better.
i repaired some microwaves, 20+ years ago, because they were worth repairing. They used stainless steel for the interior, so you didn't get peeling paint, and rust inside. The only bad thing was they had no turntable, ut you could buy an all plastic windup turntable for about $4.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I have found turntables to be ineffective if there is no RF stirrer overhead; the turntable simply moves food in and out of a stationary beam instead of distributing the beam around the cavity.
It's too bad that newer ovens eschew the stirrer in favor of the cheap turntable alternative.
Michael
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msg wrote:

What do you expect from China? Quality, good design, or a low price? You can't have all three.
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