Why are trusses being used in homes

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wrote:

No, the HVAC stuff can be run through the "webbing" of a truss without cutting anything.
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On 1/3/2013 12:14 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

...
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They are, in fact, specifically designed w/ a duct space in them (if the builder will specify it, anyway).
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snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote the following on 1/2/2013 8:34 PM (ET):

Stick built roofs require at least 2" by 6" lumber. Trusses are usually 2" x 4"s for general housing. There may be more lumber, but it is smaller lumber.

4. It may require a crane to lift the trusses, or more workers for low roofs.

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On Thursday 03 January 2013 14:26 willshak wrote in alt.home.repair:

Might be where you are -
In England, for the 1950's period +- 20 years, 4x2 are pretty normal for rooves on mid sized to smaller houses.
The last trussed roof I saw was using virtually matchsticks - 2x1.5" at best - just an awful lot of them!

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wrote:

I guess it doesn't snow in England and you don't have hurricanes.,
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On Thursday 03 January 2013 17:46 snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in alt.home.repair:

About 3 days per year on average for snow (4" if we're lucky) and we think 50mph winds are scary because something somewhere will fall off - fences first, then odd bits of roof. So basically, yep ;->
This is the south mind - the jocks get it a bit harder.
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wrote:

No snow here but we have a 170 MPH wind code.
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On 1/3/2013 11:46 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Well, if they're designed and spaced properly could probably be made to meet Code...
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wrote:

That's the kind of junk they use to build trailer homes. I lived in one of them, and the thing just started to fall apart. They're junk....
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On 01-03-2013 09:26, willshak wrote:

The building supply company delivers almost anything on a flatbed with a small built-in crane. On my house, and others in the neighborhood, the crane put the on the ground and the three men that did the rest of the framing put those in place as well.
About sixty feet of two-by-four. Since I can carry two ten-footers, I don't see any reason to doubt that three can put one up. On the other hand, I always wondered why they didn't wait and have them delivered after the walls were up. Crane could set them on top and the crew would only have to stand them up.
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snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote in news:j9n9e8h2ntua6pro7k3k2rh1kdl4ro3ndh@ 4ax.com:

There is no usable attic in todays homes because the insulation reguirements of 12" to 20"(R30-40)far exceed truss dimensions. Framing for usable attic space to accomodate the insulation would be cost prohibitive.

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On Thursday 03 January 2013 14:28 TomC wrote in alt.home.repair:

If using glasswool/sheepswoold/rockwool. You can roughly halve the thickness if using a PIR type foamboard (eg Kingspan/Celotex etc). Say, on a 4x2" rafter roof, you can, according to English building regulations currently in force, have:
1) 3"/75mm between rafters leaving a 1"/25mm air gap provided you use a breathable membrane under tiles.
2) Another 3" under the rafters will still leave a lot of space. Another option is to warm-deck the roof and stick the foam board on the outside of the rafters.

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2x4 rafters are only 3-1/2" tall. With the code required 1" air gap above the insulation, that only leaves 2-1/2" for insulation. Even the best polyurethane foam board maxes out around R8 per inch, or R20 total in a 2x4 rafter bay.
Most parts of the US require at least R38. One exception is vaulted ceilings with no attic space, which use R30.
You would need at least 2x6 rafters to accomodate R30 insulation using foam, though you might need larger rafters depending on the span.
I used 12" R38 fiberglass batts for the trussed section of our house, and 9-1/2" R30 fiberglass batts (in 2x12 rafters) for the vaulted sections of our house.
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com/about.htm
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On Friday 04 January 2013 15:11 HerHusband wrote in alt.home.repair:

Only if they are planed. Mine are sawn and as near to 4x2" as you can get.

Are you not allowed to go under the rafters with another layer of PIR? Here it is considered desireable to do so as it reduces cold bridging through the timbers.

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wrote:

Which would not be code compliant in North America. Structural lumber MUST be graded and stamped - you can NOT build with self cut or ungraded contract cut lumber, without having it all graded AND engineered.

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On 1/4/2013 1:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

...
Nonsense.
In the _far_ north, maybe, but certainly not at all universal in US.
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Sure is in Canada. - and I'm farther SOUTH than a large portion of Americans.
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You need engineering in Florida ... even for a shed.
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In most cases, trusses use less lumber because they can make use of smaller 2x4 lumber instead of larger rafters and ceiling joists.

Based on materials alone, it kind of depends on the roof design. Most of the time, a truss still costs less. If you factor in labor costs, trusses go in faster and therefore cost less to install.

Trusses can be ordered with attic rooms. Most aren't ordered that way because of cost and/or there isn't enough headroom in the attic anyway.

Trusses offer many advantages:
- Since they're built in a factory with jigs, they are consistent and accurately measured.
- They install quickly saving labor costs and help to get a building closed in to the weather faster.
- They can span large distances if you want an open floorplan. Walls then become simple partitions that can be moved around as needed.
- They provide lots of space for insulation. In a vaulted ceiling with stick framed lumber, you have to use large oversized rafters to accomodate the necessary insulation.

Not always. My wife and I carried our roof trusses about 100 feet down to our house, set them on the walls, and tilted them up ourselves. Granted, ours only spanned 16', but we could have handled larger trusses easily too.

I used trusses on part of our house, and stick framed the rest.
Where we had bearing walls to support the roof, I used 2x12's to span the rooms and provide space for insulation.
In our living room we needed to span a 16' space, with a 6/12 pitch inside and a 9/12 pitch outside, and a 2' high space for insulation. This would have been expensive and difficult to build with stick framing. Trusses handled this situation easily at a much lower cost.
We did stick frame our garage roof using 2x6 rafters and 2x12 ceiling joists (to free span the 24' wide garage). With an 8/12 roof pitch this gave us a lot of storage space in the attic.
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com/about.htm
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On Thu, 3 Jan 2013 14:39:53 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

How big is your house? 16ft wide is not a very large house, unless it's long and narrow. And if you have any overhang, then the house would only be 24 of 15ft wide....
I can see being able to hand carry a 16ft truss. Probably up to a 22ft by hand.
Of you only have a 14 to 16 foot indoor span, you must not have a center wall, because your rooms would only be 7 or 8 foot wide.
I'm planning to build a small single story house this summer, and intend to stick build it. I'm an experienced carpenter so that is not difficult. I intend to make it 23 ft wide. That way the floor and ceiling joists are 12 footers, overlapped in the center over a beam. Having a center wall for support, will allow rooms to be about 11ft. wide. That's adaquate, even though I'd prefer a little wider, but cost is the big factor. For length, I'm thinking 30ft. I can always build an addition later, and probably will as money allows. I intend to use the attic for part of the living space, (bedroom & storage) so that way I can make the entire house smaller. Because of this, I think I'll get more livable space for the money, even if the larger lumber costs more than trusses. The plan is 2x6 for the roof rafters, 2x8 for the floor and ceiling joists.
This house will be a big improvement over the cabin I live in now, which is only 12 x 16 ft. and has no indoor plumbing.
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