Why are headphone jacks for computers and handsets different diameters than cellphones?

It always seems I have the wrong diameter headphone jack when I need one.
Since adapters exist, why do they make headphone jacks different diameters anyway?
Is there a functional difference?
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On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 09:48:17 +0000 (UTC), Judy Miller

Some say "size does matter" and this is an excellent example of that. You need to be more careful of what you try to stick in your holes.
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On 02/18/14 04:48 am, Judy Miller wrote:

I'd guess that the larger, the more durable, but the size of the device often limits the size of the connector that can be used.
But some devices may produce only mono sound, while others produce stereo sound. Again, different connectors are appropriate -- not different sizes but with either two or three contact points.
Perce
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On 18/02/2014 13:43, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

and more contacts for a boom mic
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On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 08:43:25 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

And cellphones often have mono headset and microphone on thesame tiny plug - you don't want to be able to just willy-nilly plug in a set of sterio headphones with the 1/8" plug. Might be different impedence too.
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On 02/18/2014 01:48 AM, Judy Miller wrote:

Smart Phones have compatible connectors for normal earphones. Cellphones were never really designed with multimedia in mind. I'd get a better mobe.
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On Tuesday, February 18, 2014 4:48:17 AM UTC-5, Judy Miller wrote:

The 1/8" is fairly common. The large older one is 1/4" is used mostly on f ull size headphones in professional settings. You do find it on older home stereo gear. There is a smaller 3/32" but it's not very common. So I'm n ot sure why you are having size problems.
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On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 09:48:17 +0000 (UTC), Judy Miller
They started with big ones, 100 years ago. 1/4" As things have gotten smaller, the big plugs were too big for the little devices.

I have loads of adapters, but only for temporary use until I get the right product. Adapters are a pain -- they stick out -- and a little cell phone or Sandisk MP3 player won't have the power to drive the 2 or 2.5" speakers in a large set of headphones. Even if it did have the power, it would run the battery down too fast.

No, except that some headsets need a microphone, and others are monoaural or stereo, maybe with no microphone. For talking on the phone, there could be two earpieces but they would have the same sound, no stereo.
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wrote:

Perhaps the OP is refering to 3.5mm vs 1/8". Very similar size and usually compatible.
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Cell phones used to have 2.5 mm plugs, because cell phones used to be tiny.
Early AMPS (analog mobile phone service) cell phones in the 1980's were essentially suitcases, and were called "car phones". By the early 1990's, cell phones had shrunk to the point that they looked like household cordless phones. A race was on for phones to be smaller and smaller. The smaller the phone the more "status" it showed. Within about a decade, by the 2000's, phones became ridiculously tiny. These tiny phones used 2.5 mm headphone jacks to save space. Every cubic millimeter counts in a compact design.
The trend now is for phones to be larger, because they are now essentially small tablet computers, and the screen size matters. Nobody wants to use a 1.5 by 2 inch screen.
These modern smartphones tend to have the usual 3.5 mm (or 1/8") jacks that you also see on computers.
I.e. long story short; your phone is probably outdated.
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Because you have to then buy the vendors handset. Brand lock in.
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wrote:

You asked and answered your own question, but your premise is wrong. The headphone jack on both my computer and cellphone are the same size. Why did you buy the brand you did if that was going to be a problem?
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