Whole house surge protectors


I'd like to install a whole house surge protector. Using the GoogleWeb, there appears to be a variety of types with all sorts of prices. I really don't care about the price as long as it's worth it. The Intermetics are about $60.00 while the Square D's are $275.00. The guy doing my electrical work recommended I buy the Square D online.
What are you guys installing now? Thanks.
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Jack wrote:

Nuthin'...
Local co-op installs lightning arresters and haven't ever had any issues even in SW KS t-storm country.
What problems have ever had have been on phone line to modems, faxes, etc., not on power.
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There's too much money hooked up to electric/phone/cable to go unprotected. These are good for coax: http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?p=212FF75F22521&mc=09&d=TII-InLine-Coaxial-Lightning-Surge-Protector-Female-to-Female-Connector-%28212FF75F22521%29&sku=212FF75F225-21&source=googleps
R
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On Mon, 2 Nov 2009 08:52:03 -0800 (PST), RicodJour

The thing you have to be sure of is that your power and your TV/Telco/Satellite surge protection all connect to the same grounding system with as short a bonding jumper as possible. It is best if they are all grouped together. Otherwise your equipment will bond them together ... explosively..
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Says they are "listed to UL 497" which may or may not mean they are UL listed. Should be better than the center conductor protection provided by a cable entry ground block (none).

The best information on surges and surge protection I have seen is at: <http://www.mikeholt.com/files/PDF/LightningGuide_FINALpublishedversion_May051.pdf - "How to protect your house and its contents from lightning: IEEE guide for surge protection of equipment connected to AC power and communication circuits" published by the IEEE in 2005 (the IEEE is the major organization of electrical and electronic engineers in the US). And also: <http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/practiceguides/surgesfnl.pdf> - "NIST recommended practice guide: Surges Happen!: how to protect the appliances in your home" published by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology in 2001
The IEEE guide is aimed at those with some technical background. The NIST guide is aimed at the unwashed masses.
Both emphasize what gfretwell said above. The NIST guide suggests most damage is from high voltage between power and phone/cable wires (modems, faxes, TVs ...). If phone or cable entry protectors are distant from the power service, so a short bonding jumper is not possible, SquareD and others make service panel surge suppressors that have ports that incoming phone and cable attach to and ports that then supply phone and cable to the house.
Get a suppressor that is listed under UL1449. The IEEE guide recommends suppressors with ratings of 20,000 - 70,000 amps per service wire, or in high lightning areas 40,000 - 120,000 amps per wire. Because there is no standard method of measurement, Joule ratings are not a reliable way of comparing products. I would only buy from a well known company. If your service panel is SquareD, a SquareD suppressor that plugs in like a circuit breaker is easiest to install.
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Intermatic IG3240 would be a good choice. At around $125 it's about twice the price of the entry level Intermatic, will handle a much larger surge current and I think represents good protection vs price point.
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Jack wrote:

The Square-D ones are, at retail, about double the price to the trade. That way the electrician can make a profit by using the Square-D parts.
So, then, compare the specifications of the alternative modules. If the specs are roughly equivalent, then factor in the price.
You actually don't need an electrician to install these things. If your hand fits a screwdriver, you've got all you need.
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"Jack" wrote in message

I've had the Square D installed in my house for 8 years and still working great! Not one fried electronic thing since this was installed. (I also have high quality power strip surge protectors where electronic things are, but you can't use these for things like ranges which have electronic controls...)
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