Whole House Fan vs ?

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yes, my bedroom window and kitchen door
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Malcom "Mal" Reynolds wrote:

Do you simply want to evacuate warm air or do you also want to feel air movement? In the former case, just compare the CFM of proposed with the two current to know how much air they move, then figure volume of your house to determine length of time for an air exchange. I imagine the whole house fan will win hands down.
But CFM isn't the only factor for a breeze...much depends on where the air comes from, where it goes and what obstructions there may be. Size of intake opening matters too...the larger the opening the less fan generated breeze through it.
You say you have one fan blowing east, the other blowing west but where are they relative to each other along a N-S line? And where is the bedroom relative to them?
To give you an example, years ago when I was in college I had a long, narrow apartment with a passageway between rooms like this...
_________________________
kitchen _____ _____________
dining bedroom ______ _____________
bath study ______ _____________
living room _________________________ window fan
Windows were on the north in kitchen, east & south in living room and east in others. Closing all windows except one would result in a nice breeze through that window.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
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_____ _____________

window fan

_________________________
I could just open my bedroom window and get great air flow, but if I keep the kitchen door open it cools the thermal mass (concrete floor and ceramic tile) in their which helps moderate the temp during the day and it also helps cool what it can in the living room
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The quiet ones tend to be belt driven, at lower rpm. You usually have to insulate and seal it for winter. I got around that building an upper box and door. The one I have and the old one were too noisy. I don't like to run it, maybe for a few minutes. I have been known to turn it on high, and get my stihl gas blower, and dust the house out. I still want to instal a lower cfm Panasonic. If your satisfied with what you have, don't do it.
Greg
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In article

I'm most of the opinion to take your last line as appropriate advice
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Sounds like Chevy Chase in Caddy Shack....

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Malcom "Mal" Reynolds wrote:

I found the whole house fan does a much better job of getting outside air in and the air freshens the house. If you are the kind to worry about heat loss in the winter they can let a lot of warm air into the attic if you don't cover them during the winter season. Moving air around can be noisy or it can be done quietly. Blade size, air speed etc. and they bring in pollen, something to consider if someone has allergies. All in all I like my whole house fan and I use a lot.
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On 8/28/2011 11:39 PM, Malcom "Mal" Reynolds wrote:

I had a whole house fan (36") for about 15 years in a previous house and liked it very much.
There are a number of gotchas of course:
1. If the nights are *not* cool then you are just moving hot air but if they are cool then you can cool your house off in 10 minutes or so in the evening. They are not of much use during the hot daylight hours. If your climate is damp and/or pollen prone whole house AC may be a better choice.
2. If you decide to go the whole house fan route get a belt driven model. Eventually the motor will go and just replacing the motor is easier and cheaper than replacing the entire unit. Get one that has a motor rated for a rheostat for a wide range of speed adjustment as they can be noisy at high speed and mostly useless at low speed. Every house is different.
3. Build an insulated hinged box (that is easy to get to) to cover it in cold weather as it will leak heat like you wouldn't believe.
4. Attic ventilation is key and should be based on the house square footage not the fan's CFM. Its been probably 30 years since I researched this so don't take my word for it but ventilation area needs to be really large, something like 1/4 or 1/3 the square footage of the house. I ended up ventilating about 1/2 of both gable ends. That is a *lot* of cutting and vents so do take the cost, bother and view from the street of this retrofit into the equation. Try to space the vents as equally as possible on either end of the house to cool the entire attic rather than just one end. One hot end of the attic will definitely be felt downstairs. I didn't have a ridge vent as they weren't common then (at least in SW PA). I am not so sure that they would be a good thing as attic insulation would tend to cool off slower using radiation rather than air blowing across it.
HTH, John
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