Whole-house fan questions- - where to get shutters and can I use squirrel cage fan?

Hello all. I would like to install a whole house fan in order to save on air conditioning costs. I live in Denver, where there aren't that many really hot days during the average year. However, my house gets really hot during the day; especially the upstairs. It's usually reasonably cool at night when I am home but it takes the air conditioner a long time to catch up. After seeing how well my friend's whole-house fan works, it seems a no-brainer to me to put one in. However, I wanted to possibly do something a little different.
Last September my high efficiency furnace died. The fan still worked fine though. I ended up keeping the fan, thinking I could use it for a whole-house fan. I like the idea of using this type of fan since they move a lot of air but are much quieter than standard blade fans.
I've already measured and the fan will fit through my attic access opening. The main difficulty I see is that since this type of fan takes air in on two sides and blows it out the top, I will need to construct a box around it to seal the intake. This doesn't seem too difficult. I was thinking of just using plywood and 2/4's rather than sheet metal.
The second problem is shutters or louvers. I went to Home Depot and found only complete fan kits including the louvers. The whole kit was only $209. I would like to find reasonably priced louvers, and if possible, I would like to get power louvers.
Does anyone know a good place to order a reasonably priced louver that does not require cutting joists?
Lastly, I still need to measure my existing attic vents to see if I have enough. If not, I will need to add more but I don't know what kind I need. That is, could I just increase the side of the side vents of would I need more rooftop vents? I feel comfortable doing the side work but I don't feel comfortable cutting holes in my roof.
Does this whole thing seem like a good idea? Any thoughts?
Thanks in advance.
Bill
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Bill McLaughlin wrote:

Well, I don't think I would do it. The furnance fan is designed to move air against a given static air pressure, a whole house fan is designed to for different conditions. I suggest you will have better results using a real whole house fan. Many are reasonable quiet. Don't go for the cheapest small diameter one you can find.
BTW in most cases I would have said that your idea of using a fan part of the day and A/C part of the day on hot days was also not a good idea, but in Denver it may well be a good idea.
Best of Luck
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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I have a couple of $73 4TM66 16" window box fans from Grainger. They do a good job, with a free air delivery of 5850 cfm at 90 watts (65 cfm/W :-) vs Certainteed's $250 3C374 30" whole house fan with a free air delivery of 5700 cfm at 400 watts (14 cfm/W) or the $12 Holmes 20" window box fan that moves 800 cfm with 100 watts.

Seems OK to me, as long as the AC doesn't cool the house to less than the dew point of outdoor air, which seems very unlikely in Denver.
Nick
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