who's responsible for invasive plants?

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The authorities?
Geez, glad I don't have a neighbor like you.
You got the second part right. Anything growing onto your property you can deal with. That's what the OP has to do. Cut the stuff off at the property line.
I'm sure the neighbor has a right to her ivy ground cover no matter how ill advised it is. I wouldn't be calling any authorities about it. Live with it.
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Yeah, I won't be bringing the authorities in. The problem is that the property line in 2 feet deep into hedge. So for me to try and cut it off means I have to go over to her property. Most likely what will happen is that her daughter and I will come up with a new landscape plan that involves removing the existing hedge, and invading ivy, and replanting with plants more amenable to ivy prevention maintenance.
I guess it just irriatates me that people plant stuff without thinking even the slightest bit ahead to what it might lead to.
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Ah, now I see the problem.
I suppose that's why most places specify that fences must be 2 feet from the property line.

I'd be surprised if your neighbor objected to you getting on her side of the hedge and pulling out the ivy. It's got to look like hell.
A hedge spanning a property line pretty much means someone has to cross property lines to take care of it.

Neighbors with crab grass and dandelions aren't that uncommon. Some people want a perfect lawn and others just hope it stays green.
Hope you can work something out. I think I'd just say, "mind if I take care of the hedge?" and do what I want anyway.
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kzin wrote:

touching the ground. Just clear at least 6-8". Gotta crawl around a bit to cut back the ivy, but then you have room to work. Use weed whacker back to the property line to get the ivy and cut it down to the soil being careful not to chop the hedges. Now you have clear space to put down some mulch. Use Roundup to get the new growth when it has 2-3 open leaves. These are tender growth and much more susceptible to herbicide.As was said before, once you've got it down it really isn't a big deal to keep it out of your yard.
I think ivy is a really attractive plant, but hellish to keep contained and can do a lot of harm.
Folks make lots of bad decisions about what and where they plant stuff. And now we have pythons in the Everglades :o)
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On Sat 31 May 2008 07:07:39p, kzin told us...

We once bought the proverbial ivy covered cottage. It was charming and quite pretty, and the ivy was lush. However, I was very irritated when I found ivy growing through the wall and behind the range in the kitchen.
We ultimiately had every bit of ivy eradicated from the property. After it was removed from the brickwork, it all had to be repointed.
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Wayne Boatwright
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

That's for damn sure. At work, on the 1902 wings of the building, after 70-some years of picturesque ivy covering the yellow fired brick outside walls, they are spending probably a million bucks of your tax money stripping the stuff off and repairing the brick. Some areas, they are actually having to remove the outside layer of brick (which involves interesting uses for angle iron and braces to keep wall from collapsing on them), and laying in new brick, because the old stuff was spalled so badly. Ivy is pretty, but it flat-out destroys masonry walls.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

The best plan yet. It gets you access to the property.

A tip I use is to envision the plant or trees at maturity. I purposely tilted a palm tree. In a few more years, at the roof level, it will have grown "away from the house".
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Most people have no concept of how big plants will get. They want a landscape that looks mature the day they put it in, so they get the bigger, faster-growing plant varieties. Five years later, you can't see the house for the foliage.
I can't tell you the number of times I've dug out big plants for people, then recommended to them they look for replacements with "miniature" or "dwarf" in the name.
The same thing happens with all kinds of plants. Creeping Charlie and Yarrow are really pretty, but I would never recommend them, because they're invasive.
--
Steve B.
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On Sun 01 Jun 2008 05:18:56p, Steve told us...

LOL! I would be very happy if you couldn't see the house for the trees. :-)
A year and a half ago we moved into a new house on a barren lot. It is desert land in AZ. Since then we have planted various cactii and desert friendly plants. A few months ago we had an ash, a desert pine, and a lemon tree planted. The ash is in a good place for large growth, and I understand that it can grow as much as 4-6 feet per year. I've been told that the pine is a fast grower, too. The lemon tree is a drawf, but a good fruit producer (my main goal for that). We already have around 20 lemons on it that are about an inch in diameter.
I would like to add quite a few more plants/trees, but fast growers, as we are both older and I can't wait 20 years for something to mature to the size I want. After we're gone I don't care what people do to them. :-)
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The fact is there are laws about this and if you violate the law, that neighbor can bring an action against you.
If you think that is not likely because you have nice neighbors, consider this. If the OP's neighbors were nice, why would he be posting the question, when a simple word to his nice thoughtful neighbor would be enough for that neighbor to take care of the problem.
If the OP were to violate the law, which varies depending on where you live, he could find himself in a far worse condition.
These kind of property rights issues are certainly not un-common.
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Joseph Meehan

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clipped

to invasive plants. One famous plant, purple loosestrife, is choking out a lot of native plants in wetlands, but it is still sold everywhere for gardens.
Florida has lists of invasive plants, but no enforcement or code prohibiting them.
I did a quick google search for "code invasive plants" and didn't see anything that pointed to specific laws.
I don't consider folks "nice" or "not nice" based on what grows in their yard. My mom was an avid gardener and replanted just about every cutting she took. 17 kinds of trees in her yard, and a very strenuous effort to make the yard private. The OP said the ivy was taking over his hedge and a tree; sounds like he is just a little late in keeping stuff in place. It isn't that hard, and even the grass here in Florida gets "invasive" - St. Augustine grass spreads all over, including up the hedges.
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