Who Makes The BEST Appliances?

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On Fri, 05 Mar 2010 09:09:57 -0500, salty wrote:

But why is the fiddling a bad thing? What's wrong with using our brains to remember the maintenance and either carry it out ourselves - or employ someone else to do it for us? What about the whole total cost of ownership aspect; often it's more economical to have shorter maintenance/ repair cycles using cheaper, simpler parts than it is to have longer cycles that end up being time-consuming and expensive.
I think it's a lot easier to look after simple things than it is complex ones, I suppose.

I missed that in the US - I was in the UK back then, but over there 80s metal seemed to last very well, despite salted roads in the Winters. The 70s stuff was a bit of a disaster though, with crappy steel that rotted quickly without proper undersealing.

Hmm, my Truck was built in '67 - but I've no idea if the odo reading is showing 10k, 110k, 210k... :-)
cheers
Jules
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On Fri, 5 Mar 2010 13:54:26 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

Actually, the advent of lead-free gasoline had more effect on engine life (improvement) than any other single change in the last 50 years.
Less valve problems, spark plus last longer, easier on the engine oil, less engine corrosion, and longer muffler and exhaust life, to name a few.

One tuneup every 60,000 miles, which involves replacing spark plugs, PCV valve, and filters vs one every 12000 miles that included replacing plugs, points, condenser, filters and PCV valve as well as adjusting point gap (dwell) timing, carburetor, choke and valve clearance?
Hands down, I'll take today's engines - and I LOVE old cars.
And the old stuff was really HOT if it produced 1HP per cubic inch of displacement. Almost all of todays econoboxes excede that output.

With chain driven camshafts, if the oil is changed often enoug 200,000 on the chain is not a stretch. 60,000 miles on a 318 or 350 was doing pretty good

More expensive when it breaks? Perhaps. But you spend a significantly lower number of hours wages today to maintain the average car than you ever did in history.

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The manufacturer.
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Anecdotal: Maytag and KitchenAid were acquired by Whirlpool Corp. and Magic Chef was the low-end of the Maytag acquisition.
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MICHELLE H. wrote:

For what you pay for a 'good' appliance you can buy several of the cheap ones on not get to upgrade as often.
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On Wed, 03 Mar 2010 11:50:18 -0500, MICHELLE H. wrote:

Youch. One of the few things that'll kill a dryer, I suppose (most other things can be repaired)

Freecycle. Pick up a dryer for $0 from someone who's just upgraded to a new one. I don't much care for microprocessor-controlled stuff, lots of plastic parts etc.; it's a dryer - it just needs to be functional, that's all.

That's why I'm going to run my 1977 (Whirlpool) fridge into the ground - a replacement would need to run for over a decade to recover costs (in terms of power saved) and I'm not convinced of anything new lasting that long.
*If* I were going to replace things, I'd go for Miele - they're the one name I hear that just keeps on coming up as being reliable as well as having good after-sales service.

Anything GE tends to be a dirty word in our house :-) Complete garbage - avoid.
cheers
Jules
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On 3/3/2010 1:01 PM, Jules Richardson wrote:

I dunno. We have a GE washer and a GE electric dryer that we purchased in 1983 and they are both still going strong!
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On Mar 3, 6:01pm, Jules Richardson

Miele is the best. Followed by Bosch and AEG if avaible in the USA. I have Miele, reliable and enegy efficient. Unlike many American appliances. All of the above are German.
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My parts house calls them "Generally Expensive". I've replaced enough refrigerator parts to know that GE parts are more expensive.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Mar 3, 11:50am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

IMHO I think your best chance at a trouble free appliance is to select from amongst the simpler models, ie those with less bells and whistles. The more complex the device is, the more chances there are for failure. The ones that have too many cycles will have an expensive circuit board which is not repairable, (generally fails after the warrenty has expired) but rather only replaceable. Once set, most people don't use many of the cycles that they have paid for anyway.
Joe G
Joe G
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About six years ago, GE had a run of bad circuit boards for their refrigerators. Circuit board in a refrigerator. Who came up with that nutty idea?
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On Thu, 04 Mar 2010 08:01:01 -0500, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Hey, they put TVs in them these days. Maybe the designers are just out of ideas and haven't realised that competing on quality might be worth a shot...
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On Thu, 4 Mar 2010 08:01:01 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Mine has digital temp readouts with membrane switches to raise and lower the temp.
Do you suppose those readouts and the temperature controller where wired by having the components soldered freestanding like a 30's radio set? Not only was there a circuit board, but I bet there were even integrated circuits possibly surface mount!
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Until they went out of business, it was Mallin (code-named Shelby). Washburn (code-named Androck) and Speaker still make them. They've made hundreds of millions of appliances over 68 years. I don't think one has ever needed repair.
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MICHELLE H. wrote:

Two hours to dry a load is a common complaint of most dryers and can be fixed cheaply (clogged vent, temp sensor, heating element).
Rubbing on the door is probably the result of a worn-down roller, also easily and cheaply fixed.
Me? I'd fix the sucker and get another 25 years out of it.
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Yeah, someone else suggested that the dryer probably has bad "rollers" on it, that is why the drum is leaning and rubbing up against the inside door of the dryer.
But the problem is, with all the small, sharp metal shards located everywhere inside the dryer drum, lint trap, etc, is it possible to get rid of them all?? I don't want to wear clothes that have thin, razorsharp pieces of metal in them!!!!
Also, is it really WORTH fixing a dryer that is 25 YEARS OLD?????
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On Thu, 04 Mar 2010 07:39:12 -0500, MICHELLE H. wrote:

Yes, you could take it apart and clean all of that out. My concern is that you'll find that to properly fix it you'll need some part that you can't either buy or make any more (although maybe such things as dryer junkyards exist that people can raid for spares?)

*If* it's working, does it do a good job of the things you need it to do? That's the important thing to ask yourself (and that a lot of people forget).
There's not much in an old dryer that can go wrong, and spares probably still exist for the common faults (things like thermostats, heating elements, motor brushes). Perhaps it's worth calling a few spares places to check that for sure - and if they can supply the parts when needed then you may as well spend some money fixing the fault you have; it'll still be far cheaper than a new dryer (and your current dryer is probably engineered to last far longer than a new one would be)
cheers
Jules
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MICHELLE H. wrote:

Think magnet.

Only you can answer that.
Assuming: 1. Clogged vent - cost to fix: $0.00 2. Bad support rollers - cost to fix: $10.00
Total out-of-pocket cost: $10.00
You be the judge.
Me? I'd at least find the magnitude of the repair before I sprang for several hundred bucks on a replacement.
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MICHELLE H. wrote:

Yes. My dryer is an old Whirlpool, from the mid-seventies, and is at least 30 years old.
In the 10 years in which I have owned it, I have had *zero* problems with the unit, other than installing a new element in it when I took possesion of it (the faulty element was the reason it was no longer wanted by the previous owner).
When something else breaks on the unit, I will repair it. It is a well built unit, which performs its intended function flawlessly. The quality of the unit is a known factor, which is something missing in today's appliances, all of which, it seems, are marketed solely for the necessity of today's consumer to have things that look bright and shiny.
If you offered me a brand new bright and shiny unit in exchange for my old Whirlpool, I would decline your offer.
Jon
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The dryers I've worked on. The drum rests on the front of the machine, there is a plastic strip that provides relatively low friction. Might be replacable, the plastic strip.
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