Whirlpool Washer Wont Spin.. Repair or Replace?

Washer is 15 year old top loading model.
If its the transmission is it worth it to replace it?
Thanks for your help.
Bruce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bruce K. wrote:

If the rest of the washer is in good condition, it is worth spending the money on the repair, if the rest of the washer is in rough shape, start shopping.

Does it drain? What happens instead?
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you're married- tell your wife buy a new one. The brownie points you get for a new washer are priceless.
If you're single,or your wife is just unbelievably frugal, follow Jeff's advice.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 08:43:43 -0400, Bruce K.

no
Mechanical dial timer or digital?
If the former, it could be just a matter of the timer contacts not making. If so you can replace the timer, expensive, but worth it if the unit is mechanically sound.
I fixed a timer with that problem one time by drilling out the old burnt contacts and replacing them with tiny brass screws that had the head ground down. Got another four years out of a washer that was older than yours.
Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bruce K. wrote:

Did you check the door switch? Might be broken.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
p4o2 wrote:

If the cost of repairs exceeeds 50% of a new one replace the unit.
12 years for a washer is old, and well past their average 10 year lifetime.
if the parts expensive buy a new unit
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
p4o2 wrote:

MOST LIKELY THE DOOR INTRLOCK SWITCH A CHEAP REPAIR. Try jumping out the switch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If it is a direct drive model, then a no spin problem is usually caused by a broken motor coupler, and this is definitely not a reason to replace the washer. If it is not spinning, and not draining either, then it is lid switch problem. Still, a do-able repair. Both of these repairs are fairly DIY, if you are handy with tools. The lid switch would require cabinet removal (see one of my recent posts for another writer), and same for the motor coupling, though some people choose to do the motor coupling by tilting the machine back and doing it from underneath; I think this is a hassle though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Tilt the machine backwards and look under it. Do you see a pile of black rubber shavings? That's the debris from a worn-out motor coupler.
I replaced mine a couple of years ago. Fairly inexpensive part and fairly easy DIY job. And, the replacement part had obviously been re-engineered and was a better design.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had this happen on a much older Kenmore/Whirlpool belt drive washer. It turned out to be a slightly misadjusted clutch. There were two hex nuts on a threaded shaft, locked against each other. Loosening them and making a small adjustment of there position on the shaft caused the spin cycle to resume normal behavior.
Art
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.