Whirlpool stove

We have a 2 year old Whirlpool Gold double oven stove, that has some issues. 1st issue. when we want to use the oven, we set the oven to pre-heat at 350, in about 5 minutes, the oven beeps, saying it's at 350, and shows 350. But our little thermometer in the oven only shows around 200-250, and it takes another 20 minutes for the oven to actually reach 350. way too long as far as I'm concerned. 2nd issue, the stove top, somewhat the same scenario, it takes about 20 minutes for the pan to get to the proper heating level I want, way too long. Another issue is the burners for a different reason. Once the pan is at the proper level, it constantly creeps up in temperature as you use it. example. fried 3 sets of bacon today. I heated up the pan, fried 1 set of bacon, just the right temperature. While frying the second set of bacon, I noticed it was frying a little hotter, and during the 3rd set of bacon , it was splattering all over the place. Obviously the stove top is gradually rising in temperature, because I never once adjusted the heat. Any ideas? thanks in advance.
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On 12/31/2011 4:36 PM, nefletch wrote:

You don't say if this is a new problem, or it's always been this way. The incorrect oven temperature sounds like a control problem, but the fact that it heats too slowly sounds like a voltage problem. Assuming your cooktop has 4 burners, each has a separate control. If they're all erratic like the one you describe, the issue must be something else. Cooking appliances usually have a voltage range from around 208 to 240. If your electric service is 208 volts, the heating elements won't get as hot, and will take longer to heat
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I should have stated that this problem has been going on since we owned it new. As with most hectic households, we only get to bake once a month, deal with the poor oven temps, cause it's the weekend, and then don't have time to deal with it during the week. As far as the burners, same since it was new. Voltage may very well be the problem, cause if I use 2 or more burners, they are even more eratic. thanks for the response.

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nefletch wrote:

Hi, If temp. is off more than 35 deg. F, something is wrong. Or you may try to calibrate the temp. Google is friend.
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If it is electric, check the contacts where the stove plugs into the outlet. They should be bright and shiny to get the best contact and most relaible operation. Do you have a voltmeter, if so, check the voltage with the stove off and then with it on. Check on the stove side of the outlet. A drop of 1 - 4 or 5 volts when the stove is turned on is ok, more than that indicates something is wrong somewhere between the stove and the circuit breaker, or maybe even past the circuit breaker.
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Gas or electric?
wrote:

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wrote:

How long is warranty (probably 1 year)? It sounds like it could be a control board issue and that can be big bucks. You should not have problems like that on any range, especially in only two years.
Stoves with electronic controls have not proven to be all that reliable. That was a big factor in our decision to get a gas range with no electronics.
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On 12/31/2011 4:36 PM, nefletch wrote:

We have a Whirlpool wall oven (electric) and a Whirlpool gas (propane) cook top, neither "Gold". As far as the "stove top", any cook top, flat, electric coils or gas, will not hold a constant temperature. Some cook top burners do have a thermostatic control to hold constant temps, but these are pretty rare today. Whenever you put a piece of food into a hot pan, the temp of the pan will go down considerably depending on the mass and temp of said food. Same goes for frying or even deep frying. Emeril always sarcastically say, while pulling off a control knob from his cook top, "that's what these things are for ... regulate the temp" or something like that. The 2nd set of bacon will usually fry faster as the pan is already hot and some of the grease helps to conduct heat to the raw bacon. And, if it is splattering all over on the 3rd set, some or most of the grease should be removed. The stove top is probably putting out a constant number of BTUs, but other factors actually make it get 'hotter'. You really must adjust as you go.
It sounds like like your oven is not right. Is the thermometer in a place where it is near the door and possibly reading a temperature that is not representative of the whole oven? That said, in my experience, residential type ovens are horrible for holding temperature. Old gas ovens used to be good as they would throttle down the flame and reach a point of equality between heat from the burner and heat loss. However, newer gas ovens and also electric ones, shut off when the temp is reached. My previous oven, a Dacor, the temp was all over the place, even after a long preheat. I called the company, and all they could do is say that "industry standard for residential ovens is a swing of 25 degrees." Well, they just don't get it. For a big chunk of meat, 25 degrees is really ok. But, for a low mass thing like a cookie, putting it in on the high side or on the low side will make a considerable difference in the outcome. For sure, don't ever buy Dacor.
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On Sun, 1 Jan 2012 10:59:41 -0800 (PST), Evan

How is it calibration? The beep says it is up to temperature and it is not, then it does get there in another 20 minutes. I don't see that as a calibration issue. Please explain.

Of course you will. Set the burner to a given temperature and it will get to that setting and once it reaches equilibrium, it will stay there. Sure, maybe batch one to batch two will have a slight variation, but by that time, it should be where set. How else would you ever simmer if not a good control? Electrics are noted for good simmering properties for just that reason.

Within reason, yes. Damned if I'm going to sit and watch a roast for three hours or a cake for 90 minutes. If the recipe calls for 90 minutes, I'm going to check at 75 or 80 to see how much more is needed.
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