Whirlpool Dryers: Design Flaw?

I have a Whirlpool dryer and the motor just went out for the second time. I have a technician friend who says that these dryers, with the lint screen down by the door, collect a lot of lint, and this wrecks the motor. He says this is also a safety hazard because lint can collect and can combust. He also says that other brands of dryers, and even the other type that Whirlpool makes, don't do this, just the ones with the lint screen down by the door. And finally, he says that many Kenmore dryers have this same design.
So, I am wondering if this is a common problem for all of you out there, and if this has caused you problems. After all, if this is common, then you would wonder why Whirlpool doesn't do something about it.
Bye!
Shirley
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I have a 20 year old GE dryer with the lint screen just under the door. No fires yet and no motor problems. I have other problems but this isn't the group for that!! LOL
Rich

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My 7 year old maytag has screen below door. Annoying because it does not clip in securely and if you are sloppy when pulling out the clothes you can pull out screen too and get lint all over clothes. But the motor is fine.

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"Shirley Jones" wrote in message

It's doing exactly what it is designed to do, collect a lot of lint. Lint left clogging the filter is a fire hazard, it should be cleaned after every use. Not to be sarcastic here, but you can't expect a representative of Whirlpool to come over and clean the lint. You should also clean the vent exhaust piping regularly regardless of make or model or expect a fire to occur.
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My 23 year old Maytag has the filter down by the door. No fires, original motor.
An dryer can overheat if the filter is not cleaned after each use, plus it wastes a lot of energy. I don't see where it is a flaw at all. Ed
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I'm assuming you have an electric dryer.
http://fixitnow.com/appliantology/dryerfire.htm#_top
The dryer in the photo is a Whirlpool (or Kenmore - made by Whirlpool) dryer of the type you most likely have; hence, the reason for your technician friend's comments about the safety hazard. The heating element assembly is located in the bottom right hand side of the dryer. Over time, lint settles on this assembly. If there isn't enough air flow thru the dryer (as would be the case with a plugged vent or lint filter), this assembly can overheat and ignite the lint that's settled on it.
If it makes you feel better, I own this exact design Kenmore dryer and have never had a problem. Just make sure you clean the lint filter after *ever* dryer load and keep the dryer vent clean and unobstructed.
If you're really concerned, just open the dryer up (obviously, disconnect the power first) and remove the loose lint inside with a shop vacuum. Pay special attention to remove the lint that has settled on the heating element assembly. And you may as well clean the blower impeller while your at it. Accumulated lint on the vanes can lower its efficiency and reduce airflow.
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Hi,
Any dryer can/will collect lint inside, some sometimes seem to be better than others at preventing it....also maintenance is important.....cleaning out the venting system every 1-2 years, cleaning out the inside inside of the dryer every 2-5 years depending on useage. Type of venting used can also contribute to the collection of link inside the dryer.
Pictured is the dryer before we cleaned it and the danger involved in using the white vinyl venting. I say it again. If you have the white vinyl venting on your dryer, redo the vent with good pipe and save your self lots of dollars in power savings and maybe even save your life from a burnt house. There are many aluminum semi-rigid, flexible, rigid products that does a good job in venting. Use the white vinyl stuff if you insist, but don't be surprised when problems occur. Picture of the dryer (
http://www.applianceaid.com/newimages/ldrwp4r-burnt-lint.jpg ). These folks were lucky!! They were right on the verge of a major fire. Reference model 110.66901690
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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Banister's picture is exactly what I am talking about. My friend says that Whirlpool dryers with the lint screen in the door area have very poor airflow design, and they trap lint in the motor area much more than any other brand or design on the market today. He says this is a design flaw, and that there is no fix for it. My dryer is hooked to just a 3 foot tube direct to the outside, and I clean my lint screen before every use. Even with this care, there was an inch of lint in the bottom of the dryer.
Shirley
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Well then don't buy a Whirlpool. Done
Rich
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My Kenmore is 10 years old. Still have original motor, no fires. I clean out the trap EVERY load. Period. Mark L.
Shirley Jones wrote:

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