Whirlpool Dehumidifier Vibration Noise Ordeal


Hi,
Less than two years ago, I bought a Whirlpool dehumidifier model AD50DSS2. This is a 50 pint, manual control unit. I wanted a manual control type because I built my own controller which wouldn't work with electronic control dehumidifiers. Note: It is hard to find a manual control type of dehumidifier, which was common years ago.
I became very disappointed with it because of the vibration noise. The noise isn't there all the time. I called Whirlpool about the vibration noise, and they sent a service man. He opened up the unit and checked for loose components. He put some kind of compound down where the compressor is located. It seemed to fix the problem at first, but after he left, the noise was back. I will spare you the details regarding the number of times I worked on this "infernal machine". Note: I am a consumer products service technician (repair TVs, etc.). It seems as though the "housing" (cabinet) resonates with the compressor vibration, thus "amplifying" the vibration noise. If I squeeze on the sides of the cabinet, the noise goes down. The degree of vibration noise seems to be dependent on the room temperature and humidity.
I can't tell you how many times I felt like getting the sledge hammer and using it to fix the noise permanently, but where would I find a manual control, 50 pint dehumidifier?
Before this Whirlpool, I had a quiet Goldstar dehumidifier (manual control) for many years. Eventually the compressor went bad. I was told it would be too expensive to get it repaired. Unfortunately, I put it out for trash, and I bought this Whirlpool.
The reason I posted this is to warn you if you are thinking about buying a dehumidifier, go with another brand.
John
PS, Email address is not valid.
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Since you have built your own controller, what's the big deal with wiring your controller into an electronic dehum? All you need to power is the fan, compressor, freeze stat, and the switch that tells if the bucket is full. The wiring ought to be easy enough.
Since you have your own controller, you should be able to make a window AC into a dehum. Some control wiring, and build a drain under the evaporator.
Never occured to you, to glue some styrofoam insullation to the sides of the unit? Change the weight of the sheet metal, and change its resonant frequency.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Sep 29, 7:51 am, "Stormin Mormon"

I went throught this recently with a Sears/LG unit. Whatever was making it vibrate was inacessible. I finally realized that placing some weight on top of it completely solved it. Now I have a case of bottled water sitting on it. It was also sensitive to the type of weight. Stacking metal weights just as heavy did very little. I think the water probably helps absorb the resonance.
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Clever work around. Thanks for the good idea.
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Christopher A. Young
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