Which way to run deck floor boards

I am going to build a deck on a trailer house used a summer cottage. The deck will run 12 feet along the side of the house, and come out (away) from the house 7 feet. The steps will be on the front (see crude drawing below)
The frame will be treated 2x6 on treated 4x4 posts (deck is only 2 1/2 feet off the ground)
Should the deck boards run the 12 foot length (parallel to trailer wall) or run the 7 foot way (from step to trailer door) ????
I realize it would physically work either way, but what is more the approved method. or should I say what looks better and/or is better for walking? The deck boards will be those treated 1 1/8" thick X 5 inch wide boards made for decks, with 1/4" spacing. My guess is that they should run the 12 foot length, but I am looking what others suggest.
By the way, the deck will be built to be moved eventually. My plan is to build a cabin to replace the trailer, so the deck will be reused on the cabin. In other words, the 4x4 posts will not be in the ground, they will just sit on 12"x4" thick cement pads. (Hopefully 4 men will be able to move the deck later). (Steps will be separate an bolted on).
(Drawing)
TRAILER HOUSE IS HERE
<-------- 12ft. ----------->
-------[door]----------------------------- [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] -------------------------------------------- #### #### steps
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com writes:

FYI: best to leave concrete piers a little above finished grade level to eliminate conducive conditions from earth or mulch.

What length are the deck boards available in in your area?

Most decks I've seen have the boards running parallel to the house like this.
Diagonal running boards give a nicer aesthetic, but are more time intensive to fashion.

Is this in a rural anything-goes area? This certainly wouldn't fly in my municipality, FWIW. Even a small storage shed that's not constructed/fastened to concrete requires cabling and hurricane anchors screwed a certain depth into the ground to keep it from becoming a projectile in a tornado. You may wish to consider anchoring the deck positively to the concrete somehow that's still removeable (bolts in conrete or some such), unless there's a building code to follow in your area.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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Todd said: Most decks I've seen have the boards running parallel to the house like this.
I suspect that's because they have a ledger board attached to the house so that the joist are perpendicular to the house wall.
If the deck is free standing, I don't think it matters -- just what ever minimizes the number of cuts and waste.
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And it's not like that trailer won't attract tornadoes, right?
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Should be at 90 degrees to the supports under it.

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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

Run them parallel to the trailer, use 16 penny nails to gap them, so standing water will run through them.

I would suggest many more bodies to move it in the future.
Rich
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