Which type filter should we use for silt and cloudy water?


We just purchased a home with a well. The water is cloudy with grey silt sediment. We purchased a GE Smartwater Filtration System. We have tried the Pleated and Polypropylene 15 & 20 Micron Filters, which only last 1-2 weeks at the most. Any suggestion as to the correct type of filter to use for this specific problem? I feel like we're throwing money away replacing filters that don't do the job. Any help will be greatly appreciated!
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A sand filter should help. A large tank to allow settling time would help a lot.
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Nick Hull wrote:

Yep.
But to OP, what did you ask/check about the water system and what was the representation of the water system on the disclosure prior to purchase. (If there were none of either, bad idea! :( ).
Would be good to ascertain for sure where the sediment is coming from and have a test for potability (if not done before closing). Seems like if had it would have come back with warning of high suspended matter/solids content even if nothing else. Depending on kind of pump (jet vs impeller) and what is the well/water source _can_ (but not necessarily) make a big differnce in how much sediment is stirred up/pumped. Whether it's a new/old well, been reworked, has built up sediment in pressure tank, etc., etc., etc., all could effect symptoms/cures/alleviations...
To others considering purchases, again is a demonstration of need for due diligence and some expert advice _before_ the deal closes (similarly to the guy who closed w/o knowing where the property boundary lines actually were)... :(
Depending on where you are and what the rules for full disclosure are and what was/wasn't on a required disclosure (if required), OP might even have some recourse against previous owners...
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I've solved a similar problem with a sand filter (centrifugal separator )and 2 whole house filters in series. I used just the sand filter for quite a while, but the final filtering made the water clear as the finer stuff was still making it through. I tried the better filters in the whole house units, but it made it a little too clean, lacking any character at all, besides the filters only lasted a month. I've settled on the string filters, as a nice compromise.
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If a weak shower is the indicator you use to determine when it is time to change the element then two filters in parallel lasts more than twice as long. Even when the elements are much farther into the clogged stage there is still enough water for a nice shower.
How long was the well unused before you moved in? Is it new? It might need to be pumped a lot to clear up. Mine did - and I run the garden hose for a couple of hours every few days to help keep the water clear.
Personally, I'm getting a little tired of changing filter elements. It'd be nice to talk to a pro about getting a self cleaning filter, if there is such a thing.
-rev
Rockin' Realtor wrote:

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there are backwashing filters. basically it is a acid neutralizer uses different media's we just did one for cloudy water with a rotten egg odor we used a two cubic foot tank with 1/2 calcite and the other 1/2 activated carbon works great you can also use a filter ag that will trap sand the nice thing about this is it cleans it self every other day
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