Which screws to use for 2 x 4 construction?

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I always drive them down to flush, BUT! you're right that shaft is a bit anemic diameter. That one reply has me now looking for true 'construction' screws.
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Wood screws are readily available...McFeeley's has about anything you could ever want. Even HD/Lowes has a fair amount. Don't know if HD/Lowes carries square drive wood screws or not but that is way preferable to Phillips.
Besides tending toward brittleness, there are a couple other things about DW screws that tend to disqualify them. First of all, they are often #7 shank; for what you are doing I'd want #10, #8 minimally. Secondly is the head shape; this isn't a biggie but DW screws have a "bugle" head...concave on the under side. That is great for DW, less so for wood as there is less bearing surface. As I said, not a biggie especially for soft wood and I doubt you'll be counter sinking anyway.
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On 11/22/2013 10:08 AM, RobertMacy wrote:

new work, and used for what? Give us some idea how large, how much wood, how much load, etc.
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wrote:

new top to mantle of fireplace in Master Bedroom. getting rid of anemic structure, replacing with a Tuscany style sloped top with enough sturdiness to mount a big screen on swivel/tilt mounting plate. Right now the big screen weighs something like 15-20 pounds. amazingly light weight Vizio
just planning for future. as in do once.
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On Fri, 22 Nov 2013 08:08:16 -0700, RobertMacy

Don't do that. Sheetrock screws are for, um, sheetrock.

Yes.

Yeah, I sometimes use sheetrock screws for other things, too, but never in anything that is load bearing or that matters. They're probably fine for partitions but it's better to get hardware intended for the use.

Don't do it. Get the appropriate hardware.
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Yeah, starting to agree, since so readily available.
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On Friday, November 22, 2013 10:08:16 AM UTC-5, Robert Macy wrote:

square vs Torx... which is preferable?
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On Sat, 23 Nov 2013 02:39:29 -0800 (PST), Frank Thompson

I prefer square. Never had one slip at all. Very little pressure needed.
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On 11/23/2013 4:39 AM, Frank Thompson wrote:

A couple carpenters on a job said square was far better than phillips, and torx was better than square.
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+1
Not surprising that that's the order of cost, too.
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On Sat, 23 Nov 2013 02:39:29 -0800 (PST), Frank Thompson

I believe (read as I don't know) one may have a slight edge over the other but I don't know for sure. All I know is I prefer the square drive screws. I also prefer brunettes but that's another story.
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On Sat, 23 Nov 2013 02:39:29 -0800 (PST), Frank Thompson

Torx, by a furlong. ...if you have the money.
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threads, as fine as metal screws which would normally be used to go into a nut fastener.
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On Sat, 23 Nov 2013 09:49:35 -0700, RobertMacy

Fine threaded drywall screws are for steel or hardwood (how many times to you anchor drywall to hardwood?). Use coarse threaded screws in studs. Don't use them at all for structural construction. Use the proper fastener for the job.
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It was just that 'sheetrock' screws still have to seat into wood. Have lots lying around. and previous experience suggests the wood fails first. However, that one reply about using 'construction' screws kind of has me convinced to look for those.
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Thanks for the URL, After 15 minutes still nothing but 'pretty' images, but looks promising, so bookmarked for when the PC can sit on the page for awhile.
Sorry, use dialup so youtube is a major luxury. Shank Hole sound useful, too.
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thanks, those look brutal!
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I got some. Need to bend it in a vise and test.
Greg
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On Tue, 10 Jun 2014 10:20:45 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

drywall screws are JUNK. My preference when building structure is to pop it together with good screws, then add nails for extra strength. If you put something together wrong - needs to come back apart, screws are much better than nails. When you know it's right, use the framing nailer to firm it up.
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On Tue, 10 Jun 2014 12:55:21 -0700 (PDT), jamesgang

level deck, but "construction screws" are much more suitable for framing etc. Not as hard and brittle, and higher strength.
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