which rotary hammer to use?

I'd like advice on which electric rotary hammer or hammer drill to use for drilling approximately 100 2" holes in granite 6" deep in which to set steel T-posts. The job site is rough terrain and it would be easier to get a generator there than a compressor so would like to use an electric drill if there is an affordable one that could handle the job. Any suggestions?
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Having drilled concrete and rock several times I personally would be looking into a rock drill, and a BIG air compressor. I used to drive a line truck with an air compressor and a 70 pound air hammer. It would do the job, in time. When drilling granite a 90 pounder would have been a lot easier to drill. Lugging from hole to hole well..........
I believe trying granite with a core and electric tool is next to worthless. I also believe that 6 inches for a fence post is not near deep enough. An air hammer with 2 inch bit will remove the material as you drill. With an electric hammer you WILL have to chip out the core at least 3 times before you get to 6 inches. Ever inch you go into the granite will be harder and harder to remove the cores. If you buy a 2 inch drill you will run the risk of having it get stuck. (done that before)
I would not try what you describe with an electric tool. I own a TE-52 and TE-22 the 52 can core up to a 3 inch hole in concrete, which is a lot softer than granite.
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klim wrote:

That sounds like a job for a Hilti core bit machine or a Hilti rotary hammer. Granite is hard and you will need a machine that will perform. You are going to pay out the nose for a machine like that though.
http://www.us.hilti.com/holus/modules/home/home_main.jsp
You can rent these machines at a lot of rental places. I have a fairly light duty model (the TE-55) and it was a thousand dollars. The core bits run about 200 bucks each.
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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I wouldn't even try a roto hammer CORE BORE
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Sacramento Dave wrote:

I wouldn't either, but that is not what the poster asked.
To the OP:
You are getting good advice from the other responses. I would not try to do this with electric tools. I tried to answer your question, but I don't think that electric is the way to go, either. I would definitely go with an air tool for this job.
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Check this link: http://www.crowderairtools.com/rockdrills.html

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Thanks for your advice. I think I'll drop the electric option and take my neighbor up on his offer to use his mammoth air compressor on wheels and drill and invest in 300' of hose. I think you guys saved me a lot of headaches.
On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 14:12:05 -0400, "John Grabowski"

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