Which Provides Better Traction?

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I've driven everything you could ever think of in the snow and the absolute best was a Jeep Grand Cherokee with full time 4wd and a new set of Wrangler AT/S tires. A pickup truck isn't balanced as well as an SUV.
But, to answer your question, I'd take the 4wd truck over the little front wheel drive car.
I like what Eric in North TX says: You either can or you can't. I used to drive tow trucks for a living and I can't remember how many times I'd get called to a car stuck in the snow, show up, and just drive it out of the hole it was in. If that didn't work, 5 minutes with a shovel and it'd come right out. I'd charge $75 without even pulling out a winch cable.
Of course, I get to drive a Corvette home tonight in 4" of snow so if this is my last post to this newsgroup then you can discount what I just said.
-rev
On Feb 6, 3:14 pm, Windswept@home (Jack) wrote:

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I hear what you're saying, but sometimes you just "can't." I have to confess to having driven a Porsche 944 with summer tires in the snow a few times, and it helps to know your limitations. The car is excellently balanced, but if you can't move, it doesn't matter.
Since the girlie has been driving the car lately, I have invested in snow tires. I don't feel the need to inflict my stupidity on others :)
nate
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Jack wrote:

The one with REAL snow - winter tyres on it.
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Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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On Tue, 06 Feb 2007 20:14:29 GMT, Windswept@home (Jack) wrote:

Four inches ? That's nothing. A pickup truck with good tires can handle that easily. In my opinion spending the extra money on 4WD is a waste of money if all you are concerned with is 4".
As far as your question. Neither front wheel drive or 4WD is needed for four inches of snow. Bump the scenario up to eight inches and the 4WD easily outperforms the front wheel drive.
One factor that is often ignored is the weight of the vehicle. If you are going to get stuck, and this will happen, it is best to get stuck with a light vehicle. Many times I have pushed myself out of a situation whereas this wouldn't be possible with a heavier vehicle.
Worst to best:
1.Anything with bald tires 2.Pickup (empty) 3.Rear drive front engine car 4.Front drive 5.Rear engine rear drive 6.4WD
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Spoken like a man from the flatlands.
Although I manage with a RWD.
Bob
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wrote:

This is true. If you throw a lot of inclines into the equation then you are much better off with a 4wd.
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"Jack" wrote

Jack,
I've owned 4wd's since 1975, I think I'm on my 8th one. IMHO, 4 wd is over-rated for the average person. I worked construction for a long time, 4 wd was almost a must, if you wanted to get close to the job site, plus you pretty much needed a p/u to haul tools/ladders.
I plow snow for ODOT, in the Northeast. I'm always on expressways. I believe most accidents and roll-overs I see or have to radio in are SUV's or a 4 wd of kind. I don't have any statistics, nor do I know where to find them. But, I truly believe most people with a 4wd believe they're driving a tank. A 4 wd is great for starting out in the snow, they can be an asset going around curves, the thing is with a 4 wd, you have to use the accelerator to pull the vehicle through the curve. Most people hit the brakes on curves, which a 4 wd doesn't stop any better than a 2 wd.
No matter what you drive, always drive for the conditions. Too many people think just because there is a 65 (or ?) mph limit in areas, that you can and should drive it.
Don't become a statistic.
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4
find
a
Yep. 4 wheels just makes you think you have more traction than you do. When it comes time to stop, you find out.
Bob
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Front wheel drive car up to 6". Deeper than that, i'd take the 4x4.
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Steve Barker



"Jack" <Windswept@home> wrote in message
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IME there's a noticeable difference between 1" and 4" of snow as far as driving in it goes. At 1" most any vehicle will have little problem (Snow, not ice) At 4 or 5 inches, depending on consistency of the snow, some vehicles will have trouble. My old 3/4 ton 2WD pickup did not have the greatest traction compared to our tiny Ford Aspire, but when the snow is more than about 6" or so and sloppy, the limited ground clearance of the car lets it to just sink into the snow and get stuck. On the other hand, the pickup, having 16 1/2" rims, large tires, and about 15" of ground clearance, could usually be coaxed to move with a little finesse. FWIW that truck had a posi rear axle too. Anyway, to answer your question more directly, if it was less than 4" of snow the FWD car would probably be superior to a 2wd pickup.
--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf.lonestar.org
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Jack wrote:

Hi, 4WD is only on snow. If you use it on pavement it can be damaged easy. Even 4X2 PU trucks will do OK with some weight on the cargo bed. Could use some sand bags.
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A truck with weight in the bed (sandbags or whatever) will get better traction.
4 wheel drive will get better traction than 2 wheel drive.
Limited slip "Positraction" will get better traction. This makes both wheels turn even when one wheel is slipping.
Traction tires or snow tires will get better traction. (Studded tires will get better traction on ice, but they can still slide on hills!)
And then there is something about a Jeep... For some reason these tend to get better traction than a pick-up. I've seen them in pulling contests in mud. They seem to do better, but I have no idea why?
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Because the tinny little pos's don't weigh anything. And they have better front to rear balance, and they have a short wheel base.
--
Steve Barker



"Bill" < snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
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On Wed, 7 Feb 2007 10:38:04 -0600, "Steve Barker"

...and you can lock the differentials. In fact, you have to UNLOCK them to drive on pavement.
CWM
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