Which of these 4 spots (2 on tire, 2 on wheel) are supposed to be lined up?

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On Mon, 15 Jul 2013 12:49:00 -0500, Vic Smith wrote:

Actually, that was my mistake. I read "require" as "legally require"; but, you're right. Nowhere does it say it's a law.
Thanks for pointing that out.
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On 07/15/2013 10:49 AM, Vic Smith wrote:

correct.

correct.

having read this thread, i don't think he really wants to know the facts, he just wants to bitch.
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jim beam wrote:

I never came across so much bitching on a stupid little car/tire issue. We better shut down this thread which is not much useful for any one. Went to Midas shop? No wonder.
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On Tue, 16 Jul 2013 20:58:39 -0600, Tony Hwang wrote:

Then why is Midas a recommended tire rack installer?
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blue bmw wrote:

Because Midas pays to be on the list. Tire rack signs on whatever outfits wish to be on the list. The installers get more business and don't need to be bothered with stocking all of the various tires. The chain gets exposure AND while your vehicle is on the lift they might get a brake or exhaust job to add to the tires.
--
Steve W.

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On 07/17/2013 06:01 AM, blue bmw wrote:

why do tire rack sell cheap carp? or to put it another way, why would midas be stooopid enough to have you as a customer?
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jim beam wrote:

you hit the nail on the head there.
When any shop encounters someone who needs special attention or equipment or procedures above or beyond their "normal", they need to just say, "sorry, can't do it, have a nice day".
in my imaginary perfect world of course.... GW
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On 07/17/2013 01:02 PM, Geoff Welsh wrote:

there is a third way - quote them a grossly unreasonably high price. it effectively says "fuck off" but gets most of them to focus on the red herring, the number. it's a beautiful thing - they flounce off thinking they're slapping you in the face with rejection when in fact it's the other way about. if they figure it out later, they're already off the premises and unlikely to return. if they are stoopid enough to pay, well, i can suck up some abuse if i'm being paid enough. but even then, if they're paying a premium, most of them think they're getting extra special service!
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In the same manner, if they're paying a premium, most of them think they're getting an extra- special car.
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On 07/18/2013 05:46 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

which neatly circles us back to bmw - and their brilliant marketing campaign.
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jim beam wrote:

really treated him like a royalty. He bought one after he went to Germany to BMW plant, had a tour, picked his car, test drove on their track. After he flew back home the car followed. When he needed a bolt, it was priced at 100.00. Oil change at dealer shop costs like 250.00. Windshield costs couple thousands. Unbelievable!!!! Of course his trip cost was included in the price of the car I am sure.
At the dealership, customer lounge is like one at air port VIP lounge. They serve meals, snacks, all kinda fresh beverage like sitting in a first class airliner. I always think car is necessary evil. As an ordinary man I just drive ordinary car. Doing some work myself on it.
I always have fun when I take out kid's car, looking at it, it is plain stock Subaru WRX STi but inside/underneath is totally redone. Always some driver comes along and wanna race. Young kids can't figure out why my Subaru is so fast. When old guy comes along and got pissed off, I can see his face turning red, Poor old soul. Didn't he notice what kinda tire on my car?
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wrote:

Tony, the street drag-racer. Wow.
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On 07/18/2013 08:28 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

i /love/ sleepers. people driving flash motors with "arrest me" written all over them need their head testing.
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On 07/18/2013 10:41 AM, jim beam wrote:

Eh, if you buy used so you're not paying their inflated prices, they're really nice cars. Traditionally they'd last forever with proper maintenance too, not sure if that is true today of any car though.
nate
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replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
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On Thu, 18 Jul 2013 11:35:55 -0400, Nate Nagel wrote:

Actually, this is one point stated so far that *is* valid about bimmers (which shows you're a rare person here who *understands* what he is saying) ...
If you know the dozen (or so) things to look out for, and you replace or repair them periodically, then the E39 (which is what I own) M54 engine *is* a very reliable vehicle!
But - you'd have to: a) Replace the plastic DISA valve with Gary's titanium replica b) Replace the PBT Hella adjusters with EAC's aluminum replica c) Replace the entire Behr cooling system with Zionsville aluminum d) Replace the Graf composite water pump with Stewart metal impellers e) Rebuild the Bosch 5.7 ABS control module (resolder power wires) f) Replace the Kuster nylon window regulator rollers with SS rollers etc.
Note: Very few people here actually seem to know what they're talking about. And that's sad. At least you seem to, which is good.
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On 07/18/2013 01:29 PM, blue bmw wrote:

you're good as assessing technical competence on usenet as you are in tire shops!
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jim beam wrote:

I totally agree with the theory on that, but in recent experience, in a small town, that customer will leave the premises, and proceed to tell everyone he meets that day that the shop "tried to rip him off"...when of course the shop just wanted him to leave.
GW
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On 07/18/2013 12:26 PM, Geoff Welsh wrote:

that's the risk you run, but i'd rather that personally than have them run all over town making up stories about whether or not you can do your job. but this started out as a way to discourage jerks, so it's all academic unless you have the ability to spot them first. if they're a jerk and they run their mouth, chances are, only other jerks will listen.
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On Mon, 15 Jul 2013 03:15:52 +0000 (UTC), blue bmw

I don't recall the specifics of what to do with each dot but my thoughts are that the dot(s) on the rim is nearly meaningless if the car has been driven more then 15,000 miles on normal roads. Esp the "low spot" dot. It may have been the low spot before the rim was banged around for 15K + miles but whether it's the low spot anymore seems like a crapshoot. If the rims have any road rash, ditto for the "light spot". Of the two, if I was going to attempt to use the spots, I'd use the low spot dot and match it to the tires high spot dot. But instead of telling the shop to "match these two different colored dots" I would get a big yellow grease pencil and just draw a big yellow line on the inside sidewall of the tire and a big yellow line on the inside of the rim where those dots are and ask that they line up those lines when they mount the tire. Most of the shops I've been to would pull that big rim weight off first thing. Those little stick on weights they might leave on till they see how it spins in the balance machine. You have the option of just scraping them off yourself of asking them to before the start balancing it. That's kind of a hard call not knowing if those weights were there mostly because the previous set of tires needed them or if they are there because the rim needed them. I tend to think that BMW would expect the naked rims to be pretty well balanced when new so I'd be inclined to scrape them all off myself before taking them to the shop just so they won't be tempted to leave em one and balance them out with even more weight.
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On Mon, 15 Jul 2013 00:37:06 -0700, Ashton Crusher wrote:

Hi Ashton,
I appreciate your help and advice, and, well, I do understand what you're saying (in that wheels change over time) ...
However, sheer logic says that, if the wheel match-mounting mark were really therefore meaningless for replacement tires, then, (most) replacement tires would not have any need for the *legal requirement* that the high spot & heavy spot be marked (since the vast majority of replacement tires do *not* go on brand new unused wheels).
So, that belies logic (although the government isn't known to be logical).

Actually, for all but aluminum rims, the algorithm is explained in the following articles I read before posting to this newsgroup:
1. Motor magazine article on match mounting for aluminum wheels: http://www.motor.com/article.asp?article_ID 04
2. Bridgestone pamphlet on match mounting: http://www.bridgestonetrucktires.com/us_eng/real/magazines/ra_v13_i1/PDF/ra_v13i1%20ask%20doc.pdf
3. Bridgestone magazine article on match mounting: http://www.bridgestonetrucktires.com/us_eng/real/magazines/97v1issue2/Doctor.asp
4. Yokohama article explaining the "Uniformity" and "Weight" methods of match mounting: http://www.yokohamatire.com/tires_101/tire_care_and_safety/match_mounting/
5. Yokohama TSB on match mounting: http://www.yokohamatire.com/assets/docs/tsb_MatchMounting_12803.pdf
6. Rubber Manufacturers Association tire booklet (See Chapter 2, page 33 "Match Mounting"): http://www.rma.org/tire_care_info/tire_care_manual/Chapters/chapter_2_care_and_service_080311_final.pdf
7. Tire Rack article on match mounting: http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid 
My problem is in what the significance of the dimple is in the stock BMW BBS aluminum rims, since all these articles imply there is no match-mounting point in the aluminum wheels (yet, contradictory words are in the articles which state that the marks are mandatory by wheel manufacturers).
I'll call BBS to see what I can find out about that notch in my BBS wheels.
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