Which leg from the center tap is it? (Electrical)

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Wrong again. A tuned circuit will work for a CW sine wave. That's not what X10 is.

Nonsense. A cap works fine, unless there is interference on the other leg. If there is, a tank isn't going to do a damned thing either.

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wrote:

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wrote:

It depends on what the freq spectrum of the X10 signal looks like. Typically for any transmission technique like that, the signal is in fact confined to a narrow freq range. As long as the filter is tuned to pass that freq range, it will pass the signal. So unless something very unusual is being done with X10, I don't see why a tuned filter would not work.
Actually, looking at it in more detail now, the X10 transmission scheme is just the presence or absence of a short burst at 120khz that occurs at the zero crossing of the AC power. I thought previously it was in the Mhz range, but that is the X10 freq they use for wireless X10.
So you could either have a high pass filter consisting of just a cap, or a tuned circuit. The key is that either must be passing 120khz. Other than the tuned circuit rejecting any interference that might be present above 120khz, they are going to be performing the same function.

If it is tuned, then the tuned filter will reject frequencies above and below the freq of the filter. So if there was interference at a higher freq, it will not be coupled across.
.
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Right. If there is an interference source on one side, it's now on both. If there is a trap on one side, it's now on both. If both side is clean, the signal is on both. That's just the way capacitors work.
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It looks like you already have the tester. Plug the transmitter in somewhere and use the receiver to check receptacles in the other building.
On 08/31/2012 05:17 AM, snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote:

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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On 8/31/12 11:46 AM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

To expand on Mark's idea, plug the transmitter in at the outbuilding, then find which outlets the receiver works in at the main building. If no working outlets are where you want them to be, then you may need to move the breaker (that feeds the outbuilding) to another position in the panel that connects to the the other bus bar that is on the other 120v phase/leg.
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It does not appear that the second building is fed from a breaker in the first building. It sounds like it has it's own service panel fed from the same transformer.
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On Fri, 31 Aug 2012 18:00:04 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

This is correct. Separate service panel on same meter and transformer.
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wrote:

Expanding on this, you only have to find one recepticle in the other building, and then use the method in my long post to find other receptacles in that building on the same leg.
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On Aug 31, 5:17am, snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote:

Just try it. If you are on the wrong side it won't work. If you are on the right side it still may not work.
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On Fri, 31 Aug 2012 05:17:34 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote:

Can you get a roll of thin insultated wire that will reach the other building? You only need one conductor.
Can't you connect a vottmeter, set to 500VAC or to 200 VAC (if you have some sort of meter protection, or maybe 220 or 240 won't blow it. What do you use to measure the voltage at the AC, water heater, or stove?)
from the hot side of a receptacle you know works to the hot side of a receptacle you're testing. If they are on the same leg, the meter will read zero. If they are on different legs, it will read 220 (IIRC, not 240)
You can attach one end of the wire to a polarized plug, with just about any kind of stranded insulated wire, and just carry the meter from receptacle to receptacle. It doesn't have to be heavy wire because the voltmeter will prevent all but a trickle of current.
If you test the wrong slot, it will say 220 or 240, so test the other slot. It will either say 220/240 or zero. If it says zero or close** since zero can't be the neutral, that means the receptacle is wired backwards, and it is the hot on the same leg as your baseline receptacle.
Or just start off with one of those 3 LED things that tests if a receptacle is wired correctly.
P&M, Is that a valid address?
**BTW, digital meters (really, high impedance meters) everyone says are subject to stray voltages and might read 40 volts even when there is no connection to hot, so if you get confusing results, do the test again with a low impedance meter, which means an analog meter, also on the 250 VAC scale. (Digital meters are 11megohms/volt. Orr sometimes more?. Analog 20K or maybe 50K per volt, but a lot lower and they drain off the stray voltage without showing anyt hing in the meter. IIUC.
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