Which is the neutral white 3 prong power

I am replacing the power cord to our dryer. The dryer is 3 prong. The plug states to connect the white neutral to the l shaped prong. The wire has 1. black 1.white and 1.copper inner wire. Is the white neutral really the white wire, or is it the copper wire?
thanks, C
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Are you converting a 220V 4 wire connected dryer to a 3 wire conected dryer? If so there is more then just changung the plug involved. There is a bonding jumper that needs to be added as well. If not I assume it's a gas dryer with a 110V plug based on the description. For 110V:
Black = Line Voltage White = Neutral Bare Copper or Green = Equipment Ground
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No, I am not converting - I simply need a longer power cord - so I am going from three to three.
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- No, I am not converting - I simply need a longer power cord - so I am going from three to three
And you are using the same (or larger) size wire, correct? Let's be careful out there!
BTW - They sell replacement appliance cords. Maybe you could stop by a real appliance store (not a borg) and get one in the length you need.
And finally -
If it were me, I'd weigh the option of installing an outlet closer to the device against modifying the device itself.
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I stopped by an appliance store - they do not make they can not sell 10 foot cords. I bought the plug from the store and took it with me to get the wire. It is an electric drier with the two angled slots and an l
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I don't mean to sound harsh, but I really don't want you to get hurt...
re: I stopped by an appliance store
What is your definition of an appliance store?
re: they do not make they can not sell 10 foot cords
One wonders why "they do not make they can not sell" 10 foot cords. If there is a valid reason, then maybe you shouldn't be trying to make your own.
re: I bought the plug from the store and took it with me to get the wire
You bought the plug at the appliance store? And took it *where* to get the wire? I'm worried that someone would have looked at a plug with angled prongs and sold you wire meant for a 120V application. I somehow doubt they even sold you the correct guage.
I seriously think it's time to call a pro.
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wrote:

Hmmmm. Puting a longer cord on a dryer that has a plug with an "L shaped prong". Sure sounds to me like it is a 220v volt electric dryer and the OP is trying to use the wrong type of new longer cord. He needs a cord designed for 3 wire 220v applications -- 2 black wires and 1 white wire. It sounds like he has a typical 120v wire -- 1 black, 1 white and 1 bare wire.
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wrote:

So I have the wrong type of wire?
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wrote:

It seems that you do have the wrong kind of wire. It should have a red, black and white wire. The white is the neutral. The red and black wires will have 220 volts across them and the white wire will have 110 volts to the red or black wire.
This may help: http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/switchoutlet/dryer/index.htm
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Chelsea wrote:

The cable you have purchased is unsuitable for use as flexible cord. The cord for an electric dryer is only supposed to be six feet in length. If you are moving the dryer you need to relocate it's receptacle outlet closer to it's new location. Ten gauge wire is the smallest that is suitable for use at thirty amperes. Since all of the conductors in the appropriate flexible cord would be insulated you could simply mark the green wire red and use the white white as the neutral. Please keep in mind that the white wire will be serving as both the grounding conductor and the grounded current carrying conductor. Take extra care with each connection less you should someday find the frame of the dryer with 120 volts on it. -- Tom Horne
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You folks are sure scaring me. There is no neutral for 220 service. I don't care what the colors of the wire are.
The size of the wire is important. The shape of the plug is important. The colors of the wire mean nothing, although green and bare have become universally accepted for ground. Here may be some of the confusion: Current code and modern usage may require 110V for something on the dryer/range/etc (no dryers of which I am aware need 110V). The 110V requires a neutral. 220 still does not use a neutral. This configuration wants four wires, four prongs on the plug - two hots, a neutral, and a ground. The only reason for the neutral is if (rarely) there is something on the appliance that uses 110V. These colors will often be red (hot), black (hot), white (neutral), and green or bare (ground).
Older wiring will usually have a 3 wire connection. Two hots and a ground. If there is not 110V usage, you do not have or need a neutral. It may well have the ground and "neutral" lug bonded together where you attach the appliance cord. The odd shaped prong will be the ground. There is no neutral. Sometimes the colors may be Black (hot), Red (hot), Green or bare (ground). Very often the colors will be Black (hot), White (hot), Green or bare (ground). Kinda depends on what wire was available at the supply house that day.
I hope this helps some. If you cannot follow the concepts, please call an electrician.
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Immediate attention.
My earlier response was/is based on typical United States single phase, residential type power. Our friends in foreign places have different systems. I certainly did not mean to ignore, nor do I pretend to advise them
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DanG wrote:
<snip>

My gas dryer has a 120 volt timer, igniter, and motor.
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Were you planning to hook it up to 220V?
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DanG wrote:

No, of course not.
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Most have 120v motors. That is why they now require 4 prong plugs. Using the neutral to bond the frame was started in WWII to save copper and continued until 1996 when NFPA finally decided the war was over.
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wrote:

"Universally accepted"? Hardly.
In the United States and Canada, those colors are more than just "accepted". They're mandated by Code. Ground conductors may be insulated green or green with a yellow tracer, or uninsulated, and nothing else.
Outside North America, it may be very, very different.

Then you need to become more aware. Much more aware.
Gas dryers for residential use are always 120V. "Apartment size" electric dryers are usually 120V. Standard electric dryers have 120V motors and timers; only the heating elements are 240V.

Only halfway right. A *pure* 240V load doesn't need a neutral, but an electric dryer isn't a pure 240V load -- it's a 240V/120V load, due to the above-mentioned motor and control circuits, and it *does* use a neutral.

"Rarely"?? Now who's scaring whom? Electric dryers almost *always* have 120V motors and timers, even when they have 240V heating elements.

Wrong. That's two hots and an "uninsulated neutral" which was permitted by Code until quite recently.

Tell me what electric dryers do not use 120V.

Wrong again.

Wrong again. Cable with only three wires in it is nearly always black-white-green or black-white-bare. It doesn't depend on what was available at the supply house that day. It depends on electrical codes -- which, among other things, permit marking a white wire red or black to indicate that it's used as a hot conductor instead of a neutral, but *prohibit* doing the reverse. Which is why you won't see multiconductor cable that doesn't have a white wire in it.

It would help a lot more if it was right.
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Chelsea wrote:

Hook it up the same as the one you're replacing.
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Chelsea wrote:

Get a heavy duty extension cord. Jeeze, why do I have to think of everything?
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Dryers are not allowed to have 'extension' cords.
Most 220V. dryers in the US have 120 V. motors (and light bulbs).
The 4-wire wiring scheme is now mandatory for all new construction and remodelling.
The 3-wire scheme is permitted to go on (grandfathered) if you are not making major changes, which it sounds like you are. (A permitted minor change would be simply installing a new dryer).
Slipshod jerry-rigging unapproved wires to a plug some 10 feet away is not only asking for trouble, but it could be illegal, endanger you and your family, start a fire that might burn your house down, and invalidate your fire insurance should a post-fire investigation show evidence of illegal wiring methods.
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