Which is better insulation

I just put up my storm windows in the basement (full length windows in the bathroom and bedroom). Past years I put styrofoam between the upper half of the three windows. Would bubble wrap provide better insulation than the styrofoam?
---MIKE---
In the White Mountains of New Hampshire (44� 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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On Oct 14, 10:23 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (---MIKE---) wrote:

I think that depends... -----
- gpsman
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I just put up my storm windows in the basement (full length windows in the bathroom and bedroom). Past years I put styrofoam between the upper half of the three windows. Would bubble wrap provide better insulation than the styrofoam?
---MIKE---
In the White Mountains of New Hampshire (44� 15' N - Elevation 1580')
What is the R value of bubble wrap? I doubt it is as good as foam, but it does let in light if that is a factor.
Take a peek here http://planetgreen.discovery.com/home-garden/insulate-windows-bubble-wrap.html
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On Oct 14, 10:23 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (---MIKE---) wrote:

Covering the whole window with clear shrinkwrap plastic would be the best. The big box stores will have the stuff in stock.
R
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I think he meant to insulate the windows to prevent heat from radiating out through the glass, not to seal it from air leaks.
Unless I'm missing something, almost any foam should be better than bubble wrap.
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Trapped air is a good insulator. Two layers of trapped air are better than one. The OP did not mention where exactly these windows are nor their orientation. Blocking the window with insulation board might prevent solar gain if they're facing South.
Personally I don't see the benefit to blocking off light to a basement and in a bathroom unless the rest of the house is as tight as a drum.

On R-value alone, yes. The mylar-coated bubble wrap insulation also helps with radiant heat as well, as would foil-covered rigid insulation.
R
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Sort of... Trapped air that can't move is a much better insulator than air that can circulate (convection). That's styrofoam (and fiberglass).

And a thousand is even better (styrofoam).
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Ignoring the hyperbole but continuing with that logic, are you suggesting the OP remove the windows and close in the walls?
Before I'd start blocking light in a basement, I'd make damn sure that all other energy conservation avenues were exhausted. Hence my recommendation for shrink wrap clear plastic over the windows. Esthetics play a roll as well.
R
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To clear up any confusion, I was not referring to a single layer of bubble wrap. I am thinking of filling the entire space between the two windows with bunched up bubble wrap.
---MIKE---
In the White Mountains of New Hampshire (44� 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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On Oct 15, 8:29 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (---MIKE---) wrote:

You said you have full length windows (whatever that means) in the basement bedroom and bathroom. I imagine that the bedroom and bathroom are occupied. Why do you want to cut down on the light coming into those rooms?
You are asking a specific question but it's unclear if you're even barking up the right tree. Describe the basement. Exposed concrete walls? Framed out and drywalled? Framed out, fully insulated? How about the floor? Painted concrete, vinyl tile on concrete? Raised floor (sleeper system or equivalent) with insulation, plywood subfloor and carpet?
It's unclear to me whether you are trying to conserve heat when other areas of heat loss are far greater in area.
Spill with some details! Post some pictures on a hosting site and post a link to them back here.
R
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On 10/14/2011 10:23 AM, ---MIKE--- wrote:

It may depend on how airtight the insulation is. If it's not sealed all the way around, neither will do much good.
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